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OLLEGIAN 



SGA elections start today. 
Be an informed voter. 

TIM K-State Collegian 

VOTER GUIDE 



Inside this issue of the Collegian. 







w 


TUESDAY 




: 56)[42| 

WEATHER — PAGE 2 



APRIL 12, 1994 



KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66506 



VOLUME 99A, NUMBER 134 



irwnb«r Shanta 
Bailay, Junior In 
life sciences, 
listens to ■ 
complaint from 
Student Senate 
candidate Tim 
Kukula, freshman 
In political 
science, Monday 
afternoon at the 
Student 
Government 
Association 



Collegian 




Candidates plead to stay in race 



Failure to submit 
expenditure 
reports by the 5 
p.m. April 8 
deadline resulted in 
penalties for six 
Student Governing 
Association candidates 
and the disqualifica- 
tion of 12 others. 

The Grievance Committee met 
at 3:30 p.m. Monday in the Office 
of Student Activities and Services 
and listened to the candidates' rea- 
sons for missing the deadline 
before voting on each issue sepa- 
rately. 

Student body presidential can- 
didate Stcffany Carrel and her run- 
ning mate, Nabeeha Kazi. submit- 
ted their report 25 minutes after 
the S p.m. deadline. 

"I spilled black aery I lie paint 
on the porch," Carrel said. "I 
needed to be there to help clean it 
up. I did come as soon as I could." 

Carrel said she was aware her 
report was late at the time she sub- 
mitted it but was not told it would 
cause a problem. 

"It was late, so if there was a 
problem, something should have 
been done about it within 24 
hours,'* she said, referring to the 
rule that requires the Elections 
Committee to report all grievances 
within 24 hours. 



However. Kara Rogers, com- 
mittee member, said the Elections 
Committee did not officially dis- 
cover Carrel's violation until 
Sunday nighl at its meeting. 

"Sunday was technically when 
the Elections Committee found the 
violations," Rogers said. 
' The ElfCttOfis'Coinmwtce 'sen* a 
complaint to the Grievance 
Committee, which discussed the 
issue Monday night and decided 
not to disqualify the two candi- 
dates. 

Karin Erickson. committee 
member, said she didn't think the 
candidates should be disqualified. 

"In the regulations, it specifi- 
cally points out what to do about 
expenditure reports not turned in," 
Erickson said. "It doesn't specifi- 
cally state about late reports." 

As a penalty. Marcus Wyss, 
senior in finance, made a motion 
for Carrel and Kazi to find three 
students who are unbiased and not 
connected to their campaign to 
work a total of 10 hours at the 
election polls. 

The motion passed 3-1. with 
one voting member absent. 

One committee member was 
concerned that having Carrel and 
Kazi recruit workers may be per- 
ceived by other candidates as 
unfair. 

Erickson said it should not be a 
problem because they would be 
recruiting unbiased people. 

"A lot of people who volunteer 
from Senate are supporting candi- 
dates," Erickson said. "They will 
be picking out people not involved 
in their campaign." 



The same penalty was also given 
to arts and sciences senator candi- 
date Tim Kukula, who also submit- 
ted his report after the deadline. 

Kukula said he forgot to turn in 
the report Friday but didn't think it 
would cause a problem. 

"1 came In Friday to turn it in 
a'.Ki got lidL'inu'k'ed. 1 It ft md wein 
to Topcka." be aaid. "Saturday 
afternoon when I got home, I called 
Shanta (Bailey, Grievance 
Committee chair) and was told to 
get it in right away because they 
were going to be reviewed Sunday 
night. 

"It was a stupid mistake on my 
part, hut on the other hand, it was 
made clear to me that everything 
was OK." 



Bailey said she did not tell him 
there would be no consequences for 
submitting it late. 

"I have never made any deci- 
sions on my own," she said. "I've 
always waited until my committee 
meets. 

"I said. 'Go ahead and tum it in,' 
but not that everything^ 'waxOK. 
There was still the chance he could 
get disqualified." 

Because he made the effort to 
submit the report, committee mem- 
bers said they didn't think he should 
be disqualified. 

"He made a conscious effort to 
get this in." Erickson said. "There 
was a communication problem." 

■ See ELECTION Page 1 2 



"It was a stu- 
pid mistake 
on my part, 
but on the 
other hand, it 
was mad* 
clear to me 
that 

everything 
was OK." 

Tim Kukula 
Arts and Sciences 
senator candidal e 





The following csndtctttos have ban 
taken off Iht ballot but wM bt iltowad 
to run at wrtte-ln candidates, 

Board of Student Publications 
Tonya Foster 

Student Senate 
James Wifroy - arts 4 sciences 
Michael Langham - human ecology 

These candidates have been 
utaoMlffitdtrofn SGA elections. 

Student Body President 
Ja/ed Adams 



Disqualified candidate* (cent) 

Fine Arts Council 
Moflie Massieon 

Union Governing Board 
Leo Walsh 

Student Senate 
Joel Snyder -agriculture 
Amy Steanson - arts & sciences 
Matt Niemann - arts 4 sciences 
Todd Henderson -education 
Ja/edSeery- engineering 
ChrtsAvte- graduate school 



p. The general 
education 
proposal will 
be revived at 
3 p.m. In the 
Union Big 8 





SARA SaSmvCoBegiari 



SGA brings 
allegations 
of possible 
fee misuse 



csaaaM 

Three campus departments and one college 
are under scrutiny by Student Governing 
Association and the administration for possibly 
abusing student funds. 

The College of Architecture and Design, and 
the art, music and speech departments may have 
misused their allocations from the fine arts fee to 
pay for such things as computers, office supplies 
and photographs. 

Dan Lewerenz, junior in American ethnic 
studies and philosophy and chair of the Fine Arts 
Council, said his understanding was that the 
money from this fee is to be used for on-campus 
programming. 

"The purchase of the computers raised red 
flags among student senators and the student 
members of the council," Lewerenz said. 

"While the computers are being used for pro- 
gram ming-related efforts, the concern was that a 
purchase of that size could be made without prior 
authorization," Lewerenz said. 

David Procter, interim head of the Department 
■ See FINE Page 12 



FINE ARTS 


1 

COUNCIL 


SPENDING^ 

Speech Deportment 


W* 


photographs 
photographs 
photo supples 

photo supples 

photographs 

photographs 

photographs 

computer and laser printer 

TOTAL 


^+ $H 

$43.91 
$47.75 

$74 
$58.10 

$58 

$3,100 

$3,422.26 


Music Department 




travel 

printer supplies 
computer supplies 
office supplies 
TOTAL 


$2,245 

$54.90 

$31.95 

$11 

$2342.85 


College of Architecture and Design 


Macintosh computer 
TOTAL 


$2,360 
$2,360 


An LMpanment 




Macintosh computer $2,490 
Freight on stopping plexiglass 
toCaxinrab.Ohio $67.84 
TOTAL $2,557.84 


All Departments 


$10,682.95 



Union expansion finally faces voters 



Source Sludeni Governing Aucciation SARA StWTWCollaaian 



OtSsjta 

Students will make a $9 2-mil- 
lion decision today and Wednesday. 

Supporters of the Union expan- 
sion project were in the Union 
courtyard Monday afternoon trying 
to muster support for the Union 
expansion referendum. 

The referendum asks for a $25-a- 
semester increase in student fees for 
full-time students and a $14.50 
increase for part-time students to 
pay for the expansion over a 26- 
year span. 



The forum was a qucstion-and- 
answer type of situation for students 
and those interested in the expan- 
sion plan. Twelve people attended 
the forum. 

The income generated will go 
mainly to fixing infrastructure prob- 
lems. 

It will also add study areas, retail 
stores and offices for student orga- 
nizations. 

"It will also increase the Union 
Programming Council budget from 
$30,000 to $100,000." David Frese. 
student body vice president, said. 

Questions from students ranged 



from parking garages to renovation 
of the plaza between Seaton Hall 
and the Union. 

Annie Gilliam. K-State Union 
graduate assistant, showed pictures 
of damaged asbestos tape, leaking 
pipes, rusting water softeners and 
asbestos insulation falling off of a 
water heater. 

The heater provides hot water to 
about half the campus. 

"If I was the one in charge of 
where the money goes, it would go 
to infrastructure first." Gilliam said. 

Gilliam had the opportunity to 
tour some of the damaged areas. 



Violence reigns in Rwanda; foreigners flee 



KIGALI, Rwanda — Chaos, 
despair and blood flowed through 
Rwanda for a fifth day Monday. 

The air was heavy with the 
stench of thousands of corpses and 
smoke from villages burned by 
marauders. 

As foreigners sought escape 



from the ethnic warfare that has left 
an estimated 20.000 dead, U.N. 
efforts to broker a cease-fire 
between the rebels and the army 
failed again. 

The bloodshed that began last 
week is a grisly outgrowth of a 
decades-long feud between majority 
Hutu* and minority Tutsis. 

The violence, which erupted 



after the presidents of Rwanda and 
Burundi died in a plane crash 
Wednesday, has ruined a fragile 
peace between the Hutu-led govern- 
ment and the Tutsi -led rebels. 

Automatic weapons fire echoed 
through Kigali, the capita), on 
Monday, and rebel troops at a stadi- 
um and government troops at the 
parliament building exchanged mor- 



'If it was my home, I would do 
everything I could do to fix it," she 
said. 

Two second-year architecture 
students voiced their opinions about 
the lack of consulting done on the 
project. 

"A lot of architecture students 
are saying there has been little to no 
consulting," Chris Norstrom, 
sophomore in architecture, said 

The students said adequate con- 
sulting of architecture firms would 
give the Union and students a better 
Idea of what needs to be done and at 
what cost. 

tar and machine-gun fire. 

In the Rwandan capital, the roar 
of shells could be heard on the 
city's outskirts. 

Armed men. many of them clear- 
ly drunk, manned checkpoints and 
went house- to- house looking for 
victims. 

The rebel Rwandan Patriotic 
Front told Africa No. I Radio that 
its forces had advanced into Kigali 
and would not sign a truce. 



TAX TIPS AS AP 

All tax returns and 




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I return anyway and take immediate steps to begin gathering the 



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law. 



N STtWMIT AMOCWO*VCi]li|Wn 



Q Tu— da* April 12. 1—4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



♦National News 



by the Associated Press 



► F10MDA FILES SUIT AGAINST FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 



MIAMI — The federal govern- 
ment owes Florida taxpayers $1 5 
billon tor providing schooling. health 
cars and prison bods to hundreds of 
thousands of Illegal immigrants, tha 
governor said Monday as tha stats 
susd to cosset the money 

Qov. Lawion Chiles said the 
slate's lawsuit against the U.S. gov- 
ernment was the first of Its kind. 

The people ot Florida are saying 
'Enough!' to paying an unfair share 
of the cost of providing services to 
illegal immigrants," said Chiles, a 
Democrat running for re-election. 

The federal government should 
bear the financial responsibility tor its 

► ARAFAT LOYALIST KILLED IN 

SIDON. Lebanon — A senior loy- 
alist of PLO chairman Yasser Arafat 
was killed In a shootout Monday with 
opponents of the Middle East peace 
process, security sources said. 

Hussein Abu ZekJ was shot at an 
intersection in the Ein el-Hilweh 
refugee camp on the outskirts of the 
southern port city of Sldon, the 
sources said. The PLO detained two 
suspects and turned them over to 
Lebanese police, said the sources, 
who spoke on condition of anonymi- 
ty. 

Abu Zeld, 42, was among the 
most senior officers of Arafat' s main- 
stream Fatah PLO faction. He was 
the fourth Arafat loyalist killed in 



actions and should pay tor the coat 
of refusing to protect Florida's bor- 



Miami is one of the leading desti- 
nations for Immigrants from Cuba, 
Haiti and other Latin American and 
Caribbean nations 

A report released by Chiles' 
offlceconcluded that Florida paid 
about $2.5 billion in 1993 to meet the 
basic needs of all immigrants, and 
about S884 million for social services 
for 345,000 illegal immigrants 

The governor listed the coats for 
services provided In 1 993 to undocu- 
mented Immigrants, including $160 
million tor intensive English classes. 



► ADDITIONAL IMPLANT 

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Five more 
breast implant companies joined a 
record product liability settlement 
Monday, raising to $4.7 billion the 
amount that thousands of women will 
share, plaintiffs' lawyers said. 

The new total is the target origi- 
nally set by lawyers negotiating on 
behalf ot women who claim the 
implants made them ill. 

3M Corp.. which made implants 
through a subsidiary It owned from 
1977 to 1984, said it agreed to pay 
$325 million over two years. 

The former subsidiary, McGhan 
Medical, will pay an additional $25 



Lebanon since the Sept. 13 peace 
accord between Israel and the 
Palestine Liberation Organization. 

Although those suspected of 
kilting Abu Zeld oppose the accord, 
PLO and police officials did not say If 
the shooting was linked to the peace 
process or to a war between Arafat 
and terrorist Abu Nidal. 

Lebanon's refugee camps, with 
more than 170,000 inhabitants, have 
long been considered an Arafat 
power base. But his control was 
weakened after several factions 
rebelled against the agreement for 
limited Palestinian self-rule in the 
occupied Gaza Strip and the West 
Bank town of Jericho 

TO MY SETTLEMENTS 

million over 25 years. 

Others signing on, according to 
plaintiffs' lawyer Ralph Knowles, 
were Union Carbide Corp.. which 
agreed to pay $136 million over two 
years; Wllshlre Foam, $6 million over 
two years; and Applied Silicone, 
$250,000 by Friday. 

Those three companies didn't 
immediately confirm the settlements. 

The payments total $496.25 mil- 
lion, but plantiffs' lawyer Stanley 
Chesley said actuaries estimated 
thai it would amount to $998.2 mil- 
lion over the 30 years women may 
make claims under the settlement. 



► GAS LEAK SPARKS 
HOSPITAL EXPLOSION 

ST. LOUIS — An ammo- 
nia leak triggered an explo- 
sion Monday at a state psy- 
chiatric hospital, Injuring at 
least eight kitchen workers 
and forcing a partial evacua- 
tion. 

The explosion at the 
Missouri Stale Hospital 
occurred when ammonia 
fumes that had built up in the 
bakery ignited. Windows 
were shattered, and debris 
was thrown 50 feet. 

Up to 13 kitchen workers 
were cut and bruised by fry- 
ing glass and debris. 

Eight people were taken 
lo Barnes Hospital lor exami- 
nation and were expected to 
be released later in the day, 
hospital representative Dave 
Trousdale said. 

Fumes forced the evacua- 
tion of workers in the bakery 
and main kitchen, as well as 
patients in one unit. Bilie 
Harris, the hospital's quality 
management officer, said. 

► KIM'S DYSFUNCTION 
NOT FROM BEATING 

LOS ANGELES - 
Rodney King's brain dysfunc- 
tion may have been caused 
by alcoholism and learning 
disabilities rather than blows 
to the head, a neurologist 
testified today In King's civil 
damage lawsuit. 

Or. Arthur Kowell said 
there is no evidence that 
King has permanent brain 
damage from the March 3, 
1991. beating by police, but 
he said he does have 'severe 
brain dysfunction." 

Asked to give an opinion 
on the cause of that dysfunc- 
tion. Kowell said, "We have 
the history of alcoholism 
which clouds the picture We 
also have a history of learn- 
ing disabilities which further 
clouds the picture.' 




These reports are taken directly from the dairy toga ot the 
K-Ststa and Riley County Police de p a rtm e nts , ■eceuee of 
I constraints, not all crimes are listed. 




K-STATE POLICE 



MONDAY, 



111 



Al 9:36 a.m.. Hui Wu, 612 
Fremont Apt. 2, reported that he 
struck ■ parked and unattended 
car In Lot O-l. Damage was less 
(tun $500. 

Al 6:51 p.m., Riley County 
Ambulance requested assistance 

RILEY COUNTY POLICE 



for as ill student in Van Zile 
Kill. 

At 8; 11 p.m.. Manhattan Fire 
Department reported a Tire alarm 
wu Ml off at Thomas J. Frith 
Community Center. Officer 
responded: no fire was found. 



SUNDAY, APRIL 10 | 

At 3 09 p.m., lames Johnson, 
617 N. 12th, reported he had 
been a victim of a vehicular bur- 
glary. Taken was a Pyle bass 
tube and a 1 00- wan Rosdmasier 
amplifier. 

At 7:53 p.m., Linda Yancey, 
1 J 1 Bethany Drive, reported a 
black cow in her back yard. 

At 7:59 p.m.. Brian 
Ferguson. 1021 Osrdenwsy. 



reported that two white males 
dropped a white couch at that 
address and fled in a blue and 
white Chevrolet pick-up truck 
with K ansae license plate GBA 
593. 

At 10:41 p.m., Vecva 
Bratton, I03S Bros well. Topeka. 
was arretted on a Shawnee 
County warrant for stalking. 



POSTMASTER'S NOTICE 

The Kansas Stale Collegian (USPS 291 020). a student 
per at Kansas State University, is published by Student Pubkcations 
Inc., Ked/ie Hal 103, Manhattan, Kan. 66506. The Cofleojan is pub- 
lished weekdays during the school year and once a weak through 
the summer. Second class postage is paid at Manhattan. Kan. 
66502. 

POSTMASTER; Send address changes to Kansas Stale 
Collegian, circulation desk, Kedae 103. 
Manhattan. Kan 66506-7167 



• A meeting about law -school deadlines and application infor- 
mation will be from 1:30 to 4 p.m. today in Union 204. 

■ The College of Am and Science* Student Council election* 
will be today from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. There will be no elections 
tor Arts and Sciences Student Council on Wednesday . 

■ K5U Student Foundation scholarship applications are avail- 
able in die Office of Student Activities and Services. Applications 
are due si 5 p.m. April 22 In maitbo* #47 at the OSAS. 

■ Applies! ion i Tor Union Activities Board "Advisor of the 
Year" are available in the Office of Student Activities and Services. 
The deadline for application i ii noon April 22. 

TUKSOAY, APRIL IS 

■ Society for Creative Anachronism will meet at 6 p.m. m the 
National Guard Armory. 

■ Hispanic American Leadership Organization will meet al 6:30 
p.m. at the Ecumenical Campus Ministry building. 1021 Den i ton 
Ave. 

■ LelbisnATsy/Biaex ual support groups will meet from 3:30 to 5 
p.m. The women will meet in Lafene 236. and the men will meet in 
Ls/enc238. 

■ Asian American Students for Intercultural Awareness will 
meet at 6:30 p.m. in Union 202. 

■ Circle K will meet al 9 p.m. in Union 204. 

■ Christian Science Organization will meet al 5:30 p.m. in 
Danforth Chapel. 

■ SPURS will meet al 8:30 p.m. in Union 213. 

at Non-traditional Students Association will meet at 1 1 a.m. in 
Union 209. 

■ Phi Beta Lambda will meet « 7 p.m. in Union 20%. 

■ Alpha Epailon Delia will meet from 1 to H p.m. in Union 208. 

■ Mortar Board will meet at 6 p.m. in the Union Big 8 Room. 

■ The Graduate School has scheduled the final oral defense for 
the doctoral dissertation of Timothy Marshall at 9:30 a.m. in 
Che mistry /Biochemistry 437. The dissertation is tilled "Practical 
Applications for Open-path Fourier Transform Infrared Speciometry 
and Classical Least Squares Automated Spectral Interpretation 
Routines for Atmospheric Measurements." 




V'iifJiiiti:. 



YESTERDAY'S HIGHS AHD LOWS! 



Rain and thunderstorms likely 
over the eastern part of the 
stale, with rain and cold 
temperatures in the west. 








CfTV WtOiTA* COfftYWlE 
•7/4* 



■HHMHHHHH 


TODAY 


| Rainy with 
thunderstorms High 


[7*# a}*! 5° ,0 3!) - Low 
; t ^ ,J around 40. 

TOMORROW ■■■■■; 




Rainy, windy and 
cool with a high of 
55. 






Cash Rebate In 
addition to any 
current Incentives 



• Preapproved credit 

• Deff erred payment options 

Choose a vohicle to 
your needs 





$1200 Cash Rebate 

850 Free Air Conditioner 
20Z0 Discounts and Rebates 

300 +College Grad 
$2350 




Rebates up to 
$750 

300 College Grad 
$1050 



Over 80 Mazdas available! 



539-7341 
K-18 

(by the airport) 



DICK 

EDWARDS 



776-4004 
EastHWY24 




with the Collegian. 



IN ow you can pick up your 

Collegian day or night. Stop by 

Bluemont, Calvin, Durland, 

Fairchild, Justin or Seaton Halls 

before your nigjit class for the latest 

edition of the Collegian. 




c 



KANSAS STATE 

,OLLEGIAN 

TTTTst.aal of the Union) 



U2-SM0 






s«< *-»»_*- 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, April 12,1994 Q 



Nikki Kaiser, 

junior In 
pre-vaterinary 
medicine, and 
Erin Matzen, 
freshman In 
pre- veterinary 
medidna, ait In 
tha back room 
while listening to 
presidential 
candidates voice 
their opinions 
during tha Moore 
Hall Student Body 
Presidential 
forum Monday 
night. Kaiser and 
Matzen, both resi- 
dents of Ford 
Hall, wars two of 
about 30 students 
who came 
to listen to the 
candidates. 

CUTt COMOVSR 

Collegian 




Election debate draws crowd 



Col legion 

This year has brought many unex- 
pected miracles. 

The latest was the record turnout of 
30 audience members at Monday 
night's forum, Jeff Peterson, student 
body presidential candidate, said. 

All five pairs running for student 
body president and vice president were 
represented Monday night in Moore 
Hall. 

Also present was Michael Henry and 
David Frese. 

Both are candidates for arts and sci- 
ences senator. 

Each Student Governing Association 
candidate was given two minutes to 
debate a series of prearranged ques- 
tions. 

The candidates discussed what they 
said they felt were the most important 
qualities that they could bring into 
of nee. 

Having one married, non -traditional 
student and one single, traditional stu- 
dent gives the pair of Michelle Smith, 
student body presidential candidate, and 
Patrick Robben, student body vice pres- 
idential candidate, an extra balance. 
Smith said. 

"Because of our various lifestyles, 
we've had a chance to get both views of 
campus," Smith said. 

The non-traditional campaign of Ben 
Eastep. student body presidential candi- 
date, and Taylor Miller, vice presiden- 
tial candidate, stress that although they 
are outsiders to student government, 
they have been active otherwise. 

"We know we can't change the 
world in one year." Miller said. 

"No one lives forever, so don't even 
try. 



Dale Silvius, student body vice presi- 
dential candidate, said he disagrees. 

He said that he and student body 
presidential candidate, Stacy Dalton, 
have the experience necessary to handle 
the job. 

"Don't sell us short." he said, "lust 
because we've been around, we're not 
stagnant. 

"We can still bring in new ideas." 

Peterson also said he felt experience 
on campus was necessary. 

"It's not what anyone has done over 
the last few weeks that's important." he 
said. 

"For the four years that I've been on 
campus, I've been a supporter of stu- 
dent government." 

The qualities that set Steffany Carrel, 
student body presidential candidate, 
apart from her competition is her ability 
to listen and to get things done, she 
said. 

Henry said he feels il is important to 
have knowledge and experience. 

"I'd like to be able to finish projects 
I've worked on, like tuition and 
Partnership for Excellence," he said. 

Another topic debated by the candi- 
dates was the issue of lobbying to pro- 
tect student interests in Topeka. 

"I feel il's important to take a 
stronger position in Topeka against the 
tuition hikes," Peterson said. 

Peterson also said because he has 
never supported the fee issue, he would 
not support it through the student gov- 
ernment. 

"1 would have to send it to a student 
referendum for a vote," he said. 

The Legislature knows it can hike 
tuition because students do not vote, 
Robben said. 

Silvius said since there will soon be 



new legislators, it is important to go to 
Topeka to voice an opinion. 

"We've got to go down there and 
kick some butt to reverse the trend." he 
said. 

A third issue debated was the passing 
of the general -education proposal. 

If the proposal passes, 18 hours will 
be added to K-State students' curricu- 
lum requirements. 

The addition is not supposed to add 
any time onto a student's college career, 
Silvius said. 

"There is no way 18 hours outside of 
a curriculum won't increase time spent 
in college," he said. 

"The architecture and engineering 
students will get hammered by this pro- 
posal." 

Students want to get out of school as 
soon as possible. Dalton said. 

"1 don't want to get in their way," 
she said. 

K-State is full of well-rounded criti- 
cal thinkers who came to school to get a 
degree, Miller said. 

"They want to get in, get out and get 
on with their life." he said. 

Carrel explained that because the 
project has been under development for 
five years, it is guaranteed that time will 
not be added onto a person's curricu- 
lum. 

Each department will come up with 
its own curriculum and might drop a 
few previously required courses so there 
won't be an increase in hours. Carrel 
said. 

"But because we are an institution of 
higher learning, students don't come to 
just plug-in and out," she said. 

"They come to find more than just a 
degree." 



SOA ELECTIONS 



Smith, Robben making run for office 



i L. TANK 



CoUcgun 

Editor's not*: This portion of 
s student body president story 
wss left out and Is being rerun 
now m this specs out of fairness 

for the candidates. 



Michelle Smith, student 
body presidential candidate and 
senior in political science, and 
running mate Patrick Robben, 
junior in political science are 
finishing their campaign efforts 



today. 

Since Robben is a non-tradi- 
tional student and Smith is a 
traditional student, they feel 
Ihey can be sensitive to the 
needs of both groups of stu- 
dents, Robben said. 

"We're on both sides of the 
fence," he said. 

"We really want non-tradi- 
tional students to get involved 
because with elections, they 
often get left out of the whole 
process," 



The team has been talking to 
different campus organizations 
about their goals if they are 
elected. 

They plan to continue this 
campaign strategy until the 
election is over. 

Smith and Robben are not 
relying on signs tied on trees to 
win votes, Robben said. 

"Instead of emphasis on 
buying signs, we're relying on 
word of mouth and talking to 
people," he said. 



INTERNATIONAL 



Drive for peace may backfire 



ASSOCIATED 



BELGRADE. Yugoslavia — 
NATO's new toughness in Bosnia and 
the defiant Serbian response has creat- 
ed new concern that turmoil in the 
Balkans might spread if the world 
community's push for peace is mis- 
handled. 

Twice in as many days, U.S. fight- 
er jets under NATO command have 
struck at Bosnian Serb forces attack- 
ing Gorazde, one of three U.N. "safe 



areas" in eastern Bosnia. 

The aim was to force a hah to 
Serbian shelling of the town, but the 
Serbs renewed their tank and artillery 
fire after the first strike took place on 
Sunday. 

Considered the chief aggressors in 
the 2-year-old war, the Serbs are 
determined to carve out large sections 
of Bosnia. They are particularly inter- 
ested in eastern Bosnia, which borders 
Serbia proper, to create a "Greater 
Serbia." 



The air strikes reflect the interna- 
tional community's resolve not to let 
this happen. 

"The safe areas designated by the 
United Nations must remain safe 
areas," U.N. Secretary-General 
Boutros Boutros-Ghali said Monday. 

"1 will not hesitate to use air power 
again" if U.N. commanders. in Bosnia 
request it, he added. 

But Bosnian Serb leaders remained 
defiant, saying they will use all avail- 
able means to reach their goal. 

"We cannot abandon Gorazde, or a 
centimeter of our territories," said the 
head of the Bosnian Serbs' self-styled 
parliament, Momcilo Krajisnik. 








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PINION 



APRIL 12, 1994 








In Our Opinion 



By the Collegian Editorial Bmrd 



Slackers plentiful in candidate pool 



Take a long 
look at the Hat 
of students 
who missed 
deadlines — 
then think hard 
about who you 
want to run 
this University. 



It seems there are a handful of Student 
Senate candidates who are as inept as the 
election committee formed to oversee their 
election. 

Apparently, promptness is not an asset for 
17 students running for Senate. 

Twelve Senate candidates neglected to turn 
their expenditure reports in to the Election 
Committee at all. 

Five candidates, who are still in the race, 
could not find the time to make the deadline. 

Students who post signs around campus 
touting leadership skills and a concern for 
making K- State a better place could not find 
the time to turn in such a vital piece of cam- 
paign information. 

Granted, the Election Committee is a farce 
(and maybe that's too much of a compli- 
ment), but they were not responsible for forc- 



ing candidates to read the guidelines. 

Candidates are responsible for managing 
their campaigns — they are the ones at fault 
for neglecting deadlines. 

In addition, 23 candidates did not make the 
Collegian deadline for the Voter's Guide, 
which directly reaches the audience they sup- 
posedly care so much about. 

Be aware that in this election there are 
those who care little about you or about K- 
State. There are those who see it as a resume 
booster or for social points. 

Maybe one indication of those who are just 
along for the ride is neglecting important 
deadlines such as the ones 17 candidates 
missed. 

Take a long look at the list of students who 
missed deadlines — then think hard about 
who you want to run this University. 




Readers Write 



► UNION 



Expansion would only 
complicate parking problem 

Dear Editor, 

Maybe someone can help me understand 
what they are trying to do with the K-State 
Union. As close as t can tell, people are 
wanting to expand and renovate the Union 
to entice people to come to it. 

Why in (he world do they want to do that 
when there isn't enough parking to handle 
those who already frequent the Union? 

Parking has been a problem on this cam- 
pus Tor at least IS years, but the only thing 
I've heard being done about it is hiring peo- 
ple to research other possibilities for park- 
ing. How many times are administrators 
going to pay to have this done? 

When the museum is built east of 
McCain, some parking will be taken away. 
When they expand Parrell Library, more 



parking will be taken away near Blue mom 
Hall. 

Let's get the parking problem fixed 
before expanding our Union and creating 
more of a problem. 

1 don't think we should continue to let 
the administration get away with putting off 
the needs of students and staff (i.e., park- 
ing) 

Do yourselves a favor. Vote no on the 
Union renovation project. Vote no on an 
increase in your tuition. 

Brenda Halinski 
graduate student /education 

► VANDALISM 

Sand sculpture marred; those 
guilty should be ashamed 

Dear Editor, 

Sometime during the night of April 7, a 



person or persons unknown deliberately 
vandalized the sand sculpture located 
between Seaton Hall and the K-Slate Union. 
This is a message for that person or persons. 

Dan Belcher and Ken Boone, two talent- 
ed young alumni of the College of 
Architecture and Design, return each year to 
K-State at their own expense for the All- 
University Open House just to share with all 
of us their special gift of sculpting sand. 

Your thoughtless act showed complete 
disrespect not only for Dan and Ken, but 
also for all who daily pass by the sculpture 
and for K-State's Open House visitors who 
now will not have a chance to appreciate 
the beauty and uniqueness of the sand cas- 
tle. 

Shame on you. Grow up. 

Diane Potts 

administrative officer/College of 

Architecture and Design 

and 55 faculty, staff and students/College 

of Architecture and Design 



Crazy thoughts 
before finals 






Editor's note: In preparation for 
finals week, Robert Gorton is 
shedding excess comments, ques- 
tions and information from his 
brain to make room for the stuff 
he should have been learning all 
semester. We regret that he insists 
on doing it here. 

■ After careful deliberation, I've 
decided there really are two kinds of 
people in the world. There are those 
who think there are two kinds of people 
in the world, and those of us who know 
better. 

■ If God made men First — and in 
His image — why do men have nip- 
ples? Or better yet, why does God have 
nipples? 

■ Speaking of God, according to the 
Rev. Pat Robertson, many of those men 
we call the Founding Fathers were 
turned back at the gates of Heaven. 

Those weren't Mr. Robertson's 
exact words, of course, but he has 
claimed that Freemasonry is incompati- 
ble with a Christian salvation. Because 
many of the architects of our govern- 
ment were Masons, it follows that their 
salvation was not forthcoming. 

■ Speaking of religion, Michael 
Stokes of Els more was arrested for 
plotting to kill our beloved President 
Bill Clinton during his "town meeting" 
in Topeka last Thursday. 

Stokes allegedly planned to punish 
the president for his stance against 
school prayer by sneaking up behind 
him and slitting his throat. 

Thankfully. Stokes will be able to 
pray all he wants in federal prison. 

■ Who put the "bop" in "I'm gonna 
bop you on the head and take your 
money"? 

■ From the symbolism-aver-sub- 
stancc file. I can't answer my colleague 
William McKeen's question of how 
many children have been denied the 
lyrics to the "Pledge of Allegiance" by 
"morally destructive," reverence- 
squelching liberals, but I can offer a 
relevant historical altecdoie. 

While making an appearance at a 
Flag City, U.S.A., celebration in 
Findlay, Ohio, during the decidedly 
lame presidential campaign of 1988. 




ROBERT 

Gorton 



then-Vice President George Bush illus- 
trated the shallowness of 
sing-songy loy- 
alty chants 
when he ended 
the pledge by 
saying".., and 
to the liberty for 
which it 
stands... with 
freedom and 
justice for 
all. "(errors itali- 
cized) 
Curiously, 
Bush also left 
out the word 
"indivisible." 
An aid later 
refened to 
Bush's pledge as an "interpretation." 

■ Speaking of Republican 
hypocrisy, I can't understand why so 
many conservatives gripe about Clinton 
being a "pot-smoking, draft -dodging, 
womanizer," then turn right around and 
fawn over Rush Limbaugh — a pot- 
smoking, undraftable (and non-volun- 
teering) man whose lack of womaniz- 
ing may just have more to do with his 
personality than with any sort of brave 
moral stance. 

It seems some conservatives have 
redefined "character" to mean the elo- 
quent expression of what they believe. 

■ If the "back-to-basics" movement 
ever wants to gain any credibility in the 
educational-reform debate, it needs to 
quit referring to "reading, writing and 
mathematics" as "the 3 Rs."' I suggest 
they get a fourth R: spelling. 

■ Speaking of the fourth R, accord- 
ing to Pat Robertson, there's no such 
thing as a U.F.O. (What, rationality — 
from Pat? Don't bet on it.) 

Those lights in the sky. claims the 
good reverend, are not space aliens, or 
secret government aircraft or even the 
figments of attention-seeking imagina- 
tions. No, those lights are demons. 

■ Speaking of Satan's minions, it's 
time for me to take up the unholy task 
of finishing a history paper for one of 
them. Nothing fouls up the present like 
the past. 

Robert Gorton ia a junior In htatory. 



TELL US WHAT YOU THINK 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR POLICY 



We want to hear 
what you think. Send 
your 

comments and 
complaints. 
Upon submission, a 
student ID and 
phone number will 
be required. Letters 
may be edited for 
grammar and length. 



Letters to the 

Editor: 

c/o Denise Clarkin 

K-State Collegian 

Kedzie Hall 116 

Manhattan, Kan. 

66506 



Christians center truths 
around not-so-Christian events 



My God, spare me from choking on my enchilada 
especial dc Union. Dear Lord, I've actually agreed 
with something John Hart said. 

Sort of. 

Yes, I confess that I, too. am befuddled by persons 
claiming to "prove" the non-existence of God (or god 
or gods, for that matter). They occasionally err as far 
as Saint Thomas Aquinas' seven-fold failure to verify 
the existence of God. 

In addition to the "one true" faith in Christ, one 
can't forget the "one true" faiths of Mohammed or 
Joseph Smith and in the "one true" gods these 
prophets propounded. After all, they arc also histori- 
cally documented pcrsonae whose claims have' yet to 
be rejected. It seems to me that the only rational 
choice is that of Agnosticism. That is to say, one sim- 
ply cannot know. 

Heaven help me, I certainly wouldn't want to be 
branded a "Denialist" (I admire Mr. Hart for his dar- 
ing inventions when true vocabulary is lacking). 
However, in denying the possibility that God does not 
exist, Mr. Hart becomes, himself, a "Denialist." 
Consequently, the rabid believer's criticism that 
denial is anti-intellectual "turns out to be a rhetorical 
boomerang that is destined by its shape and form to 



strike the one who sent it." 

Fortunately, Mr. Hart has clearly not been graced 
with such an open mind with which to worry about 
similar rhetorical reversals. 

Also, in keeping with the 
concept of the invention of The 
Word, let us not forget "truth- 
centrism" (capital T?). You 
see, Mr. Hart, 1 .000 years ago 
many people did understand 
that the planets revolved 
around the sun. In fact, several 
thousand years ago, diverse 
societies such as the Greeks 
(who wrote part of your 
blessed book), the Mayans and 
the Dm ids knew, to an amaz- 
ing extent, many facts of 
astronomy including the plan- 
ets turning about the sun and 
the length of the year (with 
astonishing accuracy, considering their tools). This 
knowledge also included petty details such as solstices 
and equinoxes. 

It is interesting that the Christians "centered" their 




Brown 



"truth" around the winter solstice and the pagan rites 
celebrating the return of the sun. History tells us the 
birth of the man called Christ was sometime in the 
spring, but it became convenient to change his birth 
date to a time (Dec. 25) nearer the alleged winter sol- 
stice. This gave revelers a chance to continue their 
worship and Christianity a chance to gain new con- 
verts. This arrangement appeared agreeable to all par- 
ties. Indeed, again I concur: Historical lines of argu- 
ment can be dangerous — as the twisting of facts by 
an Empire of faith clearly indicates. 

The universe required a lord god to "Let there be 
Light." But it took mere men to Darken the Ages. The 
active, terroristic suppression of knowledge, learning 
and even simple curiosity in the name of controlling 
the masses for political (and financial) gain in history 
is clear. 

' Witness the Inquisition. Praise the Lord that the 
poor peasants only had to withstand about 500 years 
of "the most intense interrogation human faith could 
muster" at the hands of Christians. (By the way, 
assuming Christ was bom ca. 4 B.C. and did not begin 
his ministry until the age of 30 (26 A.D.), Christian 
beliefs could only have withstood about 1,968 years 
of questioning (although Christ was supposedly a pre- 
cocious child). Such a figure can only be determined 
through the use of a Satanic superstition known as 
subtraction — the very prefix of which has plutonic 
undertones.) 

Currently, our society faces a possible return to the 
Dark Ages as conceived by the Christian Coalition 
This advent of a new extreme conservatism (Reagan 



and Bush were moderates, remember?) shall be her- 
alded by Pat Robertson, faith healer and presidential 
candidate. The chosen will bear, similar to Cain, the 
Mega-Ditto scars of a Rushed Limbaughtomy upon 
their foreheads. The Limbaughtomization procedure 
inhibits independent thought through prohibiting 
intelligent intercourse. 

If a missing body qualifies one as Messiah, perhaps 
we should choose Vlad "The Impaler" Tepes, whose 
body is missing from its grave. Preferably, we could 
choose Jim Morrison — his coffin was sealed without 
proper legal witness. Possible candidates also include 
Jimmy Hoffa and thousands of smiling children on 
milk cartons across America. 

David Koresh claimed to be Christ. Jim Jones 
offered salvation and eternal life. Psychological sci- 
ence heals hysterical blindness, and medical science 
raises the dead. 1 myself can turn water into wine 
(though I prefer to brew beer), and Ray Kroc has 
served more than 95 billion. By Mr. Hart's "ratio- 
nale," we should "Behold the Man," Ronald 
McDonald, "Who would be" our cultural and sectari- 
an icon. 

As I await the self-returning wrath of the 
Australian aborigines, I reflect upon the recent Easter 
celebration. I AM reminded that the prior pretty-fine 
Friday was. appropriately enough. All Fools' Day. 

The Walrus was Paul. 

Shiva Brown la a K-Stata alumnua and student in 
modem ianguaoaa. 






KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, April 12, 1994 £j 



Parking solution projects 
no longer linked to Union 




They're 

Intrigued, but 



lot of work to 



Gemy Carter 

Untwitty 



Dreams, or fears, of 
seeing a parking 
garage on campus 
will have to wait a 
little longer. 

The idea of a parking garage, once 
linked to the original Union expansion 
plans, is no longer within the project, Ed 
Skoog, student body president, said. 

Several individuals around campus 
have been examining various possibilities 
that would help ease the parking problem 
on campus. 

Prominent among the possibilities dis- 
cussed were those of a shuttle bus system 
and building a parking garage. 

Last summer the Student Governing 
Association hired a graduate student to 
look at studies that had been done over 
the previous three or four years. The 
results showed that a shuttle system was 
feasible, Dwain Archer, manager of park- 
ing services, said. 

"During the time that the decision was 
supposed to have been made to implement 
the shuttle system, or really get the ball 
rolling on whether to start purchasing 
buses or outlining routes and that type of 
thing, the idea of Union expansion came 
upon the table," Archer said. "And when . 
that happened, the idea of a parking 
garage, a structure, was seriously thought 
about" 

Last, fall Student Senate began talking 
about what could be done to improve the 
Union as they felt it was deteriorating, 
Skoog said. 

They came up with the general idea 
that they could expand the Union. Several 
features were examined as possible inclu- 
sions in the expansion project, among 
them a parking garage and a hotel. 

"Then we decided that we were think- 
ing too large, and so we cut out the park- 
ing garage and the hotel because we 
didn't want to get involved with that," 
Skoog said. "We just wanted to focus on 
the Union." 

Upon studying the issue, it was also 
found that funding was an essential prob- 
lem with building a parking garage. 

"It's very expensive. Parking garages 
lose money." Skoog said. "And it's not 



necessarily one of the things the student 
body should be paying for. 

"In trying to keep the cost as low as we 
could to the individual student, we decid- 
ed it would be wisest to work just on the 
renovation and not on the parking." 

While the students are responsible for 
the Student Union, including funding and 
running it. they are not responsible for 
parking per ae. 

"Parking has always been paid for sep- 
arately, by parking feet," Skylcr Harper, 
associate architect in facilities planning, 
said. 

"The parking garage was never part of 
the student package," Harper said. 

The idea of a parking garage is now 
being considered independently of the 
Union expansion plans. 

"It's in the talking stage right now, and 
they're looking at the cost, the size, the 
number of stalls, the proper location and 
if it serves the needs," John Lambert, 
director of public safety, said. 

"We've talked briefly with some park- 
ing garage specialists in Colorado and 
Texas," Gerry Carter, University archi- 
tect, said. "They're intrigued, but there's 
still a lot of work to be done." 

"Financing would probably come from 
several sources," Archer said. 

Two conceivable ways of funding the 
building of a parking garage, if the deci- 
sion is taken to build one, have been float- 
ed. 

One would involve issuing bonds 
which would be paid back through partici- 
patory fees - through student compulsory 
fees and fees coming from parking ser- 
vices, Archer said. 

"I don't know what those numbers are, 
or how much of a fee we're talking 
about." Archer said of the student com- 
pulsory fee. 

A second idea would involve bringing 
in a private individual or company who 
would finance the building of the parking 
garage and then charge fees for parking 
there to recover the costs. 

Other options for generating revenue to 
maintain the garage could be placing 
meters inside the garage, having some 
reserved stalls and having conference- 
reserved parking inside the garage. 

"To maintain a stall is about SI 20 a 
year per stall, which would include patch- 
ing, painting and cleaning of the stall," 

■ See PARKING Page 12 



Because this 

It's a free Country 

Stuff only 

goes so far. 



VISA 



IPtUS 



It's every**iex*^ 
you'warit to be 



Hearing to introduce parking changes 



Co)k|iw 

Parking regulations could be 
changing before students' eyes, but 
most students on campus are proba- 
bly unaware of it. 

The Council on Traffic, Parking 
and Police Operations will have an 
open hearing of the proposed 1994- 
95 parking regulations Thursday in 
the Union Big 8 Room to allow stu- 
dents to express their opinions. 

This hearing is to allow students 
to examine changes in the parking 
regulations that have been proposed 
by Parking Services, and to submit 
verbally or in writing any concerns 
they may have. 

Most K -State students, however, 
are unaware of any changes that 
have been proposed in campus 
parking regulations, or even that 
such a hearing will take place, said 
Michelle Ecklund, student member 
of the council and junior in pest sci- 
ence and management. 

"Mostly, I'm just wanting to get 
people informed that the regulation 
changes are coming up Thursday 
during the hearing. That's the 
opportunity for students to get out 
and hear," Ecklund said. "Parking 
Services is making alt these changes 
without knowing how it's affecting 
a lot of people." 

■ IncrHSM in meter fws 



in an expired meter space would 
constitute a separate violation. 

All misuse fees will go up by $5, 
Ecklund said. For example, permit 
violations, such as displaying dam- 
aged or mutilated permits, will 
increase from the present $10 to 
$15. 

Visitors who do not have a visi- 
tor permit and have been issued a 
parking citation may submit the 
citation to KSU Parking Services 
within five business days for can- 
cellation. While they could previ- 
ously cancel any number of cita- 
tions in a 12-month period, with the 
new regulations, they may only can- 
cel one citation in any 12-month 
period, Ecklund said. 

■ A $8 blcycla permit tee has 



TIm CotfKi oft Trade, P&foa and 

Pcfc» QjWSfluna *M Km 3ft Optn 
healing tat arty concents about the 
new parting regulations on campus 
tar 1904-35 at 3 p.m. In the Union 
Big 8 Room on on Thursday, April 
14. 



While no change is proposed in 
the parking permit fees, increases in 
meter violation fines and misuse 
fees are being proposed, Ecklund 
said. 

The meter violation fee, present- 
ly $3, is proposed to increase to $5, 
which would go up to $10 if not 
paid in five business days. Also, 
every two hours a vehicle is parked 



Another significant proposal is 
the introduction of the $5 bicycle 
permit fee. This is a subset of the 
parking regulations. John Lambert, 
director of public safety and council 
member, said. 

"Then there's also a bicycle 
impounding fee of $10," Ecklund 
said. 

The failure to have your bike 
registered could possibly result in 
its being impounded. In that case, 
the violator could have to pay the 
penalty for not having a registration 
permit and the impounding fee. 

Parking Services draws up 
changes that it wishes to propose in 
the regulations and presents them to 
the Council on Traffic, Parking and 
Police Operations, Ecklund said. 
The council then approves these 
changes and sends them to the 
Board of Regents for approval. 

A hearing for students is con- 
ducted on campus before the 
regents make their final decision. 



All the members of the council are 
to be present at this hearing, 
Ecklund said. 

The council, which meets regu- 
larly in open meetings, comprises 
22 members, five of whom are stu- 
dents. When the council studied the 
regulation change proposals, to 
approve any of the changes, the 
members had to approve all of 
them, Ecklund said 

So even if a member was against 
a particular change, he or she had to 
allow that to happen to allow some 
of the other things that needed to be 
changed, Ecklund said. 

"At the hearing, the proposed 
changes will be briefly stated," 
Dwain Archer, manager of parking 
services and council member, said. 
"Then we'll hear any concerns 
regarding those. But this is a hear- 
ing, not a debate." 

These concerns will also be con- 
veyed to the regents. 

"After the hearing, the council 
will discuss the input. The minutes 
of the meeting will be sent to the 
Board of Regents," Lambert said, 
"which then takes the decision to 
adopt the proposed regulations or 
not at their May meeting." 



I REMEMBER TO VOTE! I 

I TTontss. Apr. 312, <& W«i. Apir. 113 
I I 



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* 



President, Vice President, Board of Student 

Publications, Fine Arts Council, 

Union Governing Board, 

Student Senators 

1st floor Union 7:30 a.m,-6:30 p.m. 

Vet Med. Trotter Hall 11:30 a.m.- 1:30 pan. 
(in front of cafeteria) 



* 



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For (lie Benefit of March of Dimes 



part deux 




• VIM um.A tno. 1994 



2nd Annual 

5 MILE RUN 

April 16. 1994 



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Sponsored bv FlrstBank 
And: 

*" Kink os, the copy can far 

«- It's Greek To Me 

•* KQLA Radio 

o~ Btlggs Jeep Eagle Isuzu 

•? Essentials.... 

«*" Thannal Comfort Atr 

<*~ Memorial Hospital Rehab. Canter 

•■ Ketlstrom Pharmacy 

<** Cellular One 

<*~ Kansas Fann Bureau 

**' Runner's World 

This Is the second running of the annual 
five (5) mile run for the benefit of The 
March of Dimes. The race begins and ends 
at Memorial Stadium, at the Intersection of 
Anderson £ Denlson In Manhattan, Kansas. 
This event will be Saturday, April 16, 1994 
with the starting gun sounding at 8 a.m. 



ENTRY/REGISTRATION 

Entry fern Is t11 through April S, 1994 and 
$13 up to and Including the day of the race. 
To enter, fill out the entry form and either 
stop by the FlrstBank lobby during regular 
banking hours or mall to: 

One Run (part deux) 

do First Savings Bank, F.S.B. 

P.O. Box 810 

Manhattan, Kansas 66502 

Attn: Terry Harts 

Make checks payable to: 

One Run for March of Olmos 

Race day registration and distribution of 
race pockets begins at' 7:30 a.m. at the 
center of the field at Memorial Stadium. 
The entry tee Includes our great T-shirt, 
which will be available for pickup on race 
day. 



Call 537-0200 for further Information 






6 




PORTS 






ROYALS SOCKED IN 10TH INNING 

KANSAS CfTY, Mo — Otis Nixon tripled loading ofl the 10th nning and scored the 

lead run on 6% Hatcher's sacrifice fly, and Tim Naehring added a two-run triple Monday 
night as the Boston Red Sox beat the Kansas City Royals 8-5. 

Kansas City trailed 5-2 m the ninth but raied to tie on LMsrun-scorlng single off 
Jeff Russel, Coleman's RBI double and Brian McRae's run-scoring double. 






la 



ilnttM 

hardball during 
K-Stetas toM to 

MlMMirlon 
Sunday. The Cat* 
begin a 



Hustlers to day. 
Two of th*< 
wtll bo at Frank 
Myers Field and 
tnraa goniaa will 
bo at Nebraska. 




Huskers and Cats start 
5-game series home, away 



Just as the K-State baseball 
team finished being swept by 
Missouri this past weekend, 
Nebraska took three games against 
Oral Roberts. 

The Wildcats will try to end 
their losing skid with a Five-game 
series against the Cornhuskers, 
starting at 7 p.m. at Frank Myers 
Field. 

Nebraska (19-16 overall, 3-7 in 
the Big Eight) has won seven of 
its last eight games, while K-State 
(11-24, 2-10 in league) has 
dropped 17 of its last 19 contests. 

Coach Mike Clark said he was 
unhappy about his team's perfor- 



mance against Missouri. 

"I was disappointed because we 
didn't come ready to play," Clark 
said. "We are going to change our 
approach to the game." 

Kevin Wicker, the starting 
pitcher for K-State today, said get- 
ting a couple of wins over the 
Cornhuskers would help propel 
the team to the Big Eight 
Tournament. 

"It's important we get 
Nebraska down right away 
because they are one of the teams 
we are competing against — along 
with Iowa State and Missouri," 
Wicker said. 

Wicker goes to the mound with 
an 0-3 record with a 6.67 earn run 



average. Adam Novak, a left-han- 
der with on 0-2 record and a 4.08 
ERA. starts on Wednesday. 

Clark said Nebraska has not 
named a starter for tonight, but 
will use pre -season all- American 
Troy Brohawn tomorrow. 

Nebraska began lo turn their 
season around when they took two 
games from league-leading 
Oklahoma State. Clark said he 
knew that Nebraska would be a 
good team. 

"Whether they are as good as 
Oklahoma State will remain to be 
seen," Clark said. 

"They aren't like other 
Nebraska teams, but with the way 
they were capable of getting runs 




STANDINGS 

OVERALL BIG ErGhT RECORDS 





w 


L 


PCT 


Oklahoma St. 


11 


3 


.786 


Oklahoma 


8 


4 


.687 


Kansas 
Missouri 


10 
6 


5 
5 


.667 
,545 


Nebraska 


3 


7 


.300 


lows State 


4 


10 


.286 


K-STATE 


2 


10 


.167 



against Oklahoma State and Oral 
Roberts, they are a very formida- 
ble opponent for us." 

Darin Dukart and Darin Erstad 
are the keys to the Comhusker's 
offense. Erstad has a team-high 
eight home runs and 32 runs bat- 
led in. and is batting .333 with 10 
stolen bases. 

Clark said the pitching and 
defense have to get better if they 
want to win and make it to the Big 
Eight Tournament in one month. 



Cats still searchim 
for new coach 



CoitoflU 

The deadline has passed, and 
the search still goes on. 

K-Statc's search for a new 
head basketball coach is stilt no 
closer to completion Hum it was 
almost two weeks ago when 
Dana Altman resigned 

Some sources have said that 
an offer hat been made to 
Pepperdine's coach Tom Asbury, 
Yet, no official siging has taken 
place. 

1/ the offer has been made, an 
announcement could come as 
early as today. 

Asbury was in Manhattan on 
Suday to interview wkh K-State 
officials. 

If Asbury does not sign with 
the Cats, Ohio's coach Larry 
Hunter maybe the next choice 
for the job, 

Monday morning was the last 
time coaches could speak to 
potential players until Wednes- 
day. 

"A decision does not appear 
to be imminent," athletic director 
Max Urick told the Associated 
Press Monday. 

"We're still in the process. 
It's only been about a week since 
the committee ha* been able to 
get together. We're working hard 
to do the best we can." 

National signing day for col- 
lege recruits is Wednesday and 
until that time, coaches may not 
speak to the players, 



K-Siaie'n heir appar 
Tulsa's Tubhy Smith, I irm 
down a lucrative offc< bj 
State to remain with the Gold 
Hurricane. Smith led his team 
two wins In the NCAA Tour 
anient this season. 

Smith made the announce- 
ment he would remain at Tulsa 
last Friday during a rally cele- 
brating his team's performance. 

The announcement on the part 
of Smith surprised many people 
who were waiting for him to sign 
the contract with K-State 

Even more surprising is that 
Smith is among the names being 
tossed about for the Oklahoma 
coaching Job after Billy Tubes' 
resignation, Smith has not signed 
a now contract with Tulsa and 
has just a verbal agreement, 
sources said. 

Another coach who has been 
mentioned for the post is 
Washburn's Bob Chipman. 

While Chipman was among 
the early leaders in the race for 
the job. more recent (peculation 
focuses on Asbury and Mike 
flrey, an assistant coach at Duke 
working with Mike Krzyzewski, 

While they must still find an 
individual to fill the position 
quickly, officials have avoided 
the hasty decision- making that 
many alumni felt Altman's 
appointment was. 



The Associated 
totttfe story. 



Press contributed 



VOLLEYBALL 



Search begins again for 
Hagemeyer replacement 



JIMWrr CRABTRtl 

Collffun 

Back lo square one. 

That's the situation with ihe 
vacancy of the K-State volley- 
ball coach position. 

K-State thought they had the 
right person for the job, when 
the athletic department offered 
Barton County Community 
College coach Ray Bechard the 
head coaching job. 

However, Bechard turned 
down K-State "s offer, after a 
month long application process, 
which included two interviews. 

"We were led to believe that 
this was his dream job," senior 
associate athletic director Jim 
Epps said. "It's very disappoint- 
ing. We were very high on his 
abilities, and we thought that he 
would be a good match." 

Now that Bechard turned the 
offer down, K-State wilt have to 
continue to search for a replace- 
ment after Patti Hagemeyer 
resigned earlier this year. 

"We're going to do two 
things," Epps said. "We're look- 
ing over the pool of candidates 
again, and we're soliciting rec- 
ommendations to create an even 
larger pool. 

"We have a couple of candi- 
dates, but I can't give any names 



right now," 

The team is currently under 
the direction of assistant coach 
Sue Medley. 

Middle-blocker Suzanne 
Hagge said she is concerned that 
the Cats do not have a coach yet. 

"We've been kept in the dark, 
and not informed about anything 
at all," Hagge said. "Actually, 
now thai we've been practicing 
it's going to be a hassle to have 
to change things around to fit a 
new routine." 

Middle-blocker Kate DeClerk 
also said she is also concerned. 

"I know that the athletic 
department is doing everything 
that ihey can," DeClerk said. "I 
am concerned, but I know that 
they are trying." 

K-State has also played in a 
tournament this spring and the 
Cats to two victories against 
Kansas and Missouri. 

If it were regular season play, 
the two wins would be the Cats* 
first Big Eight Conference victo- 
ries since 1992. 

"We've been working hard 
since Christmas." Hagge said. 
"Sue has been coaching us 
everyday at practice. 

"1 wouldn't have any qualms 
against her being the head 
coach." 



OUTDOOR TRACK 



Despite cancelled meet, athletes well conditioned 



K-Staic took a bus to Boulder, Colo., 
Sunday and came back empty-handed. 

No, Ihe Wildcats weren't blown out 
by the Buffaloes, but by mother nature. 

The Colorado Invitational was can- 
celed Sunday because of a thick blanket 
of snow. 

List week's snows in Manhattan 
hampered training for outdoor events. 

"It definitely huru," Coach Cliff 
Rovelto said. "The runners aren't get- 
ting adjusted to running on the bigger 
(outdoor) track." 

The 400-meter relay teams have been 
unable to perfect hand-offs, Rovelto 
said Additionally, the weather has con- 
fined the discus- and javelin-throwers to 
indoor workouts. 

The Cats are hoping for better weath- 
er Saturday at the John Jacobs 
Invitational in Norman, Okla. 



Teams from the Big Eight 
Conference, Southwest Conference, and 
community colleges from Texas, Kansas 
and Oklahoma will participate in the 
meet, 

Rovelto said he is pleased with the 
overall condition of his athletes at this 
point in the season. 

"I am pleased with the way most of 
the team is progressing," Rovelto said. 

Nicole Green, Dante McGrew and 
Krister Schultz have all progressed 
extremely well, he said. Each surpassed 
NCAA provisional qualifying marks at 
Ihe College Station Relays at Texas 
A&M on March 20. 

McGrew, with his leap of 52 feet, 4 
inches in the triple jump, eclipsed the 
provisional mark for the second-straight 
season. 

"I'm happy with the mark, but I 
should' ve done better," McGrew said. 

Off-season workouts are what helped 



Schultz propel the javelin six feet fur- 
ther than her previous personal best, she 
said. 

Schultz 's loss of 160" 5" betlered the 
provisional mark of 1 52' 6- 1/2". 

"My speed is improved from last 
year," Schultz said. 

Schultz is the defending Big Eight 
champion in the event. 

Green has garnered some accolades 
of her own this season. 

After earning indoor all-America 
honors in the 400 meters, Green ran past 
the provisional time in the 200 meters at 
the College Station Relays with a time 
of 23.82. 

Rovelto said he isn't worried if some 
of the performances aren't perfect yet. 

"You can't do it all." Rovelto said. 
"You can' I train hard and win the Drake 
Relays or the Big Eighl — you have to 
work toward big meets and give your 
athletes some rest." 



OOLF 



Team's season on back nine 



Catagai 

The K -State men's golf team is entering its 
final lap of the season Tuesday in 
Birmingham, Ala., for the Bent Brook/Blazer 
Invitational. 

The Wildcats will attempt to tune up an 
engine that has sputtered lately with a ninth- 
place finish at the Diet Pepsi/Shocker Classic 
in Wichita and has left K-State coach Mark 
Elliott with many unanswered questions. 

"We are nearly done with our season, and 
we still have a lot of questions to be answered 
throughout our lineup," Elliott said. 

Ellioti will once again test the team 
realignment, which he experimented with in 
Wichita, when he sends three seniors and a 
pair of sophomores into action. 

Elliott has been looking to the senior lead- 
ership of Sean Robertson, Chad Judd and Will 
Siebert to lead his team back lo the winning 



ways that saw the team qualify for regional 
competition last year. 

"We gave the younger guys a shot to get it 
done, and they just haven't been able to do it. 
so we're going to turn it over to the seniors 
and see what Ihey can do," Elliott said. 

Joining the three seniors will be sopho- 
mores Troy Haltcrman and Jason Losch. 
Elliott said the performances at Bent Brook 
would help to determine who he would send 
to the Big Eight Championships April 25-26. 

The importance of this final tune-up before 
the Big Eight Championships is not lost on 
the players. 

"It's definitely a big tournament for us," 
Sean Robertson said. "We know we need to 
get going and build some momentum for the 
Big Eight, so we're pretty excited about play- 
ing well in Birmingham." 

The Cats will tec off at 7:30 a.m. Tuesday 
against a field of 14. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, April 12, 19*4 7 



■ 




Widow shares 
Cobain's last note 



I WHirUY/Cotloglsn 

Ed CaiTWy, Parking Services security officer, watches traffic from his booth near the K -State Union, where he greets campus visitors. 

\tt IfifnriTiitinfi' Camey meets ^ ^ of people 

iVir* iniUlUIdlJUlL from a booth near the Union parking lot 



"Everyone 
loves mo, 
hates me. All 
I do Is abide 
by the rules 
they put out." 
I Ed Carney 

Information 
booth worker 



WOSVUHMH 

CMkfNB 

Over the strains of 
country music, 
Ed Carney 
chuckles to the 
woman with Nebraska 
tags as he comments 
about Nebraska's basket- 
ball season. 

Then, Camey calmly repeals the 
words he knows by heart, pointing out 
where she can park and where differ- 
ent buildings are. 

His baby granddaughter smiles 
down from the picture hanging above 
him. Another wall holds a brightly col- 
ored parking map. Orange safety cones 
are stacked along one side of the tiny 
cubicle. 

Camey is the man familiar to many 
K-State visitors, the man who works 
inside the information booth that sits 
beside the Union parking lot. 

For 15 years, Carney, a retired 
Riley County Police officer, has 



answered the questions of bewildered 
visitors. 

"You meet all kinds of people who 
come by here." Carney said. "Some 
speak English. Some cannot. Some 
that are nice. Some that are not. Some 
say I'm rude. I just listen — they do 
all the talking. 

"Everyone loves me. hates me All I 
do is abide by the rules they put out." 

From 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.. 
Carney is in charge of giving out visi- 
tor permits, directing people and 
advising maintenance people where 
barricades need to be put for special 
events on campus. The 5.000 people 
who attend rodeos at Weber Hall or 
the 200 people who attend a confer- 
ence in the K-State Union have Camey 
to thank for their parking places. 

When he is at lunch, sick or on 
vacation, students fill in for him. 

The most frequently asked question 
is the location of Anderson Hall. 

"About 90 percent ask where 
admissions is." Camey said. 

The remaining 10 percent want to 
know a variety of things. 

"I just give them the information 
they need and send them on their way. 



unless they want to strike up a conver- 
sation. I try to keep up on current 
events, football, basketball, sports." 
Camey said. 

The number of questions Carney 
answers each day varies. 

"1 think I had about 1.500 people 
come through here last year." Camey 
said. "I'm not sure. 

"It's pretty hard to judge. You don't 
know from one day to the next. One 
day you may have 20, one day 120. 
You learn to write fast." 

Besides writing fast, Carney 
endures working in a small, open 
booth. He said with all the scenery, 
trees and leaves falling, it doesn't real- 
ly bother him. But some things do. 

"I dread when trucks come by each 
side of me, and the vibrations about lip 
this old shack," Camey said. 

And. he has to deal with the weath- 
er. There is no insulation, so the winter 
can get really cold. Carney said he 
then wears his overcoat. 

Despite these problems, Carney 
sees a lot of interesting things. 

"There's a lot of funny things that 
do happen, but I have to have a 
straight face," he said. 



SEATTLE — Tearful and pro- 
fane, Kurt Cobain's widow. 
Courtney Love, read from his sui- 
cide note in a recording played for 
thousands of fans who participated 
in a candlelight vigil to mourn the 
grunge rocker. 

Meanwhile, Love and dozens of 
others, including members of 
Cobain's band. Nirvana, and Love's 
band. Hole, attended a private 
memorial service Sunday night at a 
church a few blocks from where the 
vigil was being held. 

About 4,500 mourners, mostly in 
their teens and 20s, listened solemn- 
ly to a tape of Love reading from 
Cobain's note. Many in the crowd 
wore scruffy, ripped clothes, the 
signature of the grunge rock style 
that Nirvana helped boost into the 
mainstream. 

"I haven't felt the excitement for 
so many years. I felt guilty for so 
many years," Love read on the tape 
as tears flowed freely in the crowd. 
"The fact is I can't fool you, any 
one of you. The worst crime is fak- 
ing it." 

Love interrupted her narrative to 
add, in a voice thick with tears, 
"No. the worst crime is leaving." 

Before reading the note. Love 
described it as sounding "like a let- 
ter to the editor." She omitted parts 
addressed to her because, she told 
the crowd, "it's none of your — 
ing business." 

Cobain. 27, was found dead 
Friday of an apparently self-inflict- 
ed gunshot wound. 

■ Nirvana bassist eulopliet 



from the Bible and some of 
Cobain's favorite poetry, as well as 
from her husband's suicide note. 

There was no casket at the ser- 
vice. Burial plans were not dis- 
closed. 



In an interview in today's Seattle 
Post-Intelligencer, Love said she 
blamed herself for Cobain's death. 
"I'm tough and I can take anything. 
But I can't take this," she said. 

"I listened to too many people," 
she said. "I'm only going to listen 
to my gut for the rest of my life. It's 
all my fault." 

The problems of Cobain, 
Nirvana's lead singer, guitarist and 
songwriter, were well documented: 
heroin addiction, discomfort with 
celebrity, domestic disputes and a 
near- fatal ingestion of drugs and 
alcohol just last month. 

One of Nirvana's last songs, 
recorded for "The Beavis and Butt- 
head Experience" album, was titled 
"I Hate Myself and Want to Die." 



At the private memorial. Nirvana 
bassist Krist Novoselic talked about 
Cobain's appreciation of the punk- 
rock ethic, in which "no band is 
special and no player is royalty." 

Love, dressed in black, read 



lows Cobain's lead, kills self 

A man fatally shot himself 
Monday in what police say was an 
apparent reaction to last week's sui- 
cide of rock star Kurt Cobain. 

The man in Maple Valley, 20 
miles southeast of Seattle, killed 
himself with a shotgun. King 
County police representative Dave 
Robinson said. The man's room- 
mate said the victim, 28, was 
despondent over Cobain's death. 

Tohain the 27-year-old lead 
singer for Nirvana, also killed him- 
self with a shotgun. His body was 
found Friday in the Seattle home he 
shared with his wife, Courtney 
Love, and their 20-month-old 
daughter. 

No further details about the death 
were immediately available. 



Embezzler executed in 
anti-corruption campaign 



BEIJING — The president of a 
Chinese company who embezzled 
about $375,000 was executed on 
Monday in another example of the 
government's ant i -corrupt ion cam- 
paign. 

A vice minister was sentenced to 
20 years in prison in the same case. 

Shen Taifu, 39. president of the 
Great Wall Machinery and 
Electronics High-Technology 
Industrial Group Corp.. was execut- 
ed on charges of embezzlement and 
bribery totaling 3.25 million yuan 
($373,500), the official Xinhua 
News Agency reported. 

His wife, Sun Jihong. company 
vice president, was given a 15-year 
sentence. Li Xiaoshi, vice minister 
of science and technology, who 
accepted thousands of dollars in 
bribes from Shen, was Fired from 



-i - fr-i^ i— i— i^r~i».i~i~i - r-i— fr-i-i- i—, i— i— i— i- i— i- 1— i— i— i-i-i—r— i— i- i— i— i— i-: 



^ 



Aaron 







Student Board of Publications 

Vote Today & Tomorrow in the Union 



Paid for by the students to elect Otto 

■l-l^l- 1— t— i^i- 1— i— i— i- t- i- 1- t— t— i—t— t— i- m a=>iw - wb-t—t— i— i- t— t — i— i— i. 



-i-T 



his post, expelled from the 
Communist Party and sentenced to 
20 years in prison. 

The sentences were among the 
harshest in China's anti -corruption 
campaign, which has been going on 
for several years with little effect 

In many cases, government offi- 
cials get off with little more than a 
warning or demotion. 

But authorities wanted to make 
an example of the Great Wall case 
because it gained widespread pub- 
licity last year as one of China's 
biggest financial scandals in recent 
years. 

More than 100.000 people 
nationwide bought bonds issued by 
the Great Wall company after read- 
ing favorable publicity about it in 
the official media. The bonds car- 
ried 24-percent interest — more 
than double the return from banks 
and treasury bonds. 

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April 12-13 10 a.m. to 4 p.m 



Q TV—da* April 12. 1H4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



General education faces faculty 



education 
will actively 
Involve stu- 



tooch thorn to 
in* tholr crit- 
ical thinking, 
writing and 
communica- 
tion •Mils." 

AjtUNA MlCHIE 

President ol 
Faculty Senate 



ogajfjo 

The idea of gener- 
al education has 
been examined, 
twisted, turned 
upside down and 
bounced back between 
committees and the 
Faculty Senate. 

In a meeting at 3:30 p.m. 
Tuesday, the proposal will once 
again come alive on the floor in the 
Big 8 Room. 

The idea of general education has 
been around for years, but the past 
proposals have been revised, modi- 
fied or rejected. 

After conducting hearings and two 
meetings on general education, mem- 
bers of the academic affairs commit- 
tee said they think they have 
designed a proposal which meets the 
needs of the faculty and students at 
K-State. 

Steffany Carrel. Student Senate 
representative to Faculty Senate, said 
general education, which was 
designed to broaden an undergradu- 
ate's experience at K-State, will be 
beneficial to the students. 

"It will make K-State students 
stronger when they graduate," Carrel 
said. 



The proposal will require stu- 
dents to take 18 hours in specially 
designed general-education courses 
outside their majors but would not 
add to the actual credit requirements 
for graduation. 

If passed, new courses will be 
developed, professors will modify 
their teaching styles, and currently 
existing courses will be adapted to 
fit the focus of general education, 

■ OmmtsI •duefttM wW offtr 



Students who used to sit, listen 
and take notes will have a completely 
different learning experience under 
general education. 

"General education wilt actively 
involve students and teach them to 
use their critical thinking, writing and 
communication skills," Aruna 
Michie, Faculty Senate president, 
said. 

A professor must create an active 
learning environment, find a way to 
communicate to both majors and 
non-majors and create a connection 
of ideas between the course and the 
everyday world to participate in the 
program. 

Inviting guest lecturers, showing 
film strips and coordinating special 
activities are ways professors can 
design their courses to meet the gen- 
eral-education requirements 



"In one of my classes, I set up a 
mock parliament session and divided 
my students into the two parties to 
increase the understanding of the 
Parliamentary system in Britain," 
Michie said. 

"I could easily propose that course 
for general education because it 
meets the goals already." 

Michie said she doesn't expect 
any major problems with course 
approval and development. 

'There is a fairly good format that 
is being laid out, and &» long as peo- 
ple stick to that, there won't be a 
problem," she said. 

Bill Schapaugh. chair of academic 
affairs, said the committee made a 
few minor changes in the proposal in 
the revising stages to make it more 
appropriate for the University. 

"We had good discussion, and the 
changes, modifications and amend- 
ments to the proposal were relatively 
slight, but they all improved the pro- 
posal," he said. 

Carrel said the committee has had 
good discussions and made the right 
decisions. 

"Politics is the art of the possi- 
ble," Carrel said. 

"The folks in that committee real- 
ized that in order to get il passed, 
they would have to make adjust- 
ments." 

Schapaugh said the modified pro- 
posal has full support from the acade- 
mic affairs committee and the 
Student Senate. 




EDUCATION 

Any proposal ifbdtog thf onttro unrvin^ rwirt oo throwgti 6^ pftjeo* 



Count aid 

Curriculum 
Commute* 



Academic Attain 
Committee 



Full Faculty Senate 
(meets today) 




arMn sheet itaaa 

■mBBn ■"•■1 OJaSPl^O 



final wntlderttlon 



"We're excited about it and are 
behind it all the way," Schapaugh 
said. 



ceoc#iD#d about coat and 



avpiiavfHTf or 



Carrel and the Student Senate sup- 
port the proposal, but they have con- 
cerns about the economic resources 
and availability of courses. Carrel 
said. 

"We are concerned that we might 
not have enough money to do this." 
she said. 

"The provost proposed a seed of 
$250,000, but bow far will that goT 

Michie said she is aware that 
many questions and concerns will be 
raised in the meeting and can't pre- 
dict the outcome. 



■Nit sWTrVCoNeglan 

"The vote in Senate could go 
either way," she said. 

Schapaugh said he expects the 
proposal lo be hotly debated in 
Senate and has invited the provost 
and original ad hoc committee mem- 
bers to answer questions about funds 
and courses. 

Michie said the Academic Affairs 
Committee decided to introduce the 
proposal in April to extend the 
amount of time for discussion 
between the April meeting and the 
last Faculty Senate meeting in May. 

"There will be a substantial 
amount of questions and debate 
before people have explored all 
avenues and options," Schapaugh 
said. 

"1 want to have enough time to 
adequately discuss it" 



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IVERSIONS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



CROSSWORD 



Eugene Sheftu 



ACROSS goldfish 

1 Information 35 Don* 



»C«p«— . 



B Member of 
the pack? 

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additive 

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tour de 

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31 Boars, 
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32 In the 
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or Ely 

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7 Fata* 

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Solution lima: 24 mint. 



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Yesterday's answer 4-1 2 



playmate 
18 Trellis 
twiner 

20 Tackles' 
teammates 

21 A little bull 

22 -lacta — 
est* 

23 Daybreak 

24 Loiter 

26 True 

27 Near- 
black blu* 

28 Mirth 
28 Crew's 

supply 
31 Playwright 
Connelly 

34 Goal 

35 State of 
Mexico 

37 Stolen 

38 Son of 
Noah 

39 Fabri- 
cation 

40 "Puppy 
Love* 
singer 

4i Child's 

play 
44* — was 

saying..,* 

45 Ms. piggy 

46 Dander 

47 Keep 
talking 



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CRYPTOQUIP 



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Engravings 
concentrate 
on religion, 
humanity 



An exhiM of James 
Munce's work is 
now on display at 
the Strecker Art 
Gallery. 322 Poyntz 
Ave, The show runs 
through April 23. 



CaTfetM 

James Munce, associate pro- 
fessor of art, is exhibiting 
at the Strecker AH Gallery 
in downtown Manhattan. 

Munce, a prinimaker. creates religiously 
ihemed engravings. His show traces his style 
from the late 1970s to the present, encompassing 
his entire career as a Manhattan artist. 

One series of engravings, "St. Francis 
Restores the Neglected Church," follows the 
work being done 
in an old, dilapi- 
dated cathedral in 
order to restore it. 
Some of the prints 
in this series are 
color, allowing 
the brilliant 
stained-glass 
scenes to be fully 
revealed. 

"The Wedding at Cana" series, in which reli- 
gious mysticism tells of water being turned into 
wine, traces how a family deals with marriage. 
Some of the images are quite funny in how they 
depict the way both sides of the newly united 
family respond to each other. 

Part of this series, "The Imminent ln-Laws 
Disagree Over Seating Arrangements," is of par- 
ticular interest Munce demonstrates his wonder- 
ful capability of arranging figures. The vertical 
table acts as the division of the quarreling people. 

In all of his religious work, modem dress is 
used. His prints show us the modem counterparts 
to the biblical characters referred to. This connect 
tion is of integral importance. 

Most of Munce's work displays an aspect of 
verticality. Unlike the Prairie Printmakers, 
Munce mostly concentrates his art on the human 
world, rarely examining nature. His "Dead Bird." 
one of the earlier works, was probably done 
when Munce first moved to Manhattan and he 
was discovering the natural beauty of the area. 

Not to be overlooked is a small room just off 
the main exhibition room. In it is a quaint display 
of Munce's drawings and sketches of people used 
in his work. It allows you to take each person 
into consideration, apart from each picture. You 
get a more personal feel for Munce's style. 

Munce's "Abraham and Isaac" is wonderfully 
styled in a dark way, with a more subtle drawing 
manner lying below the surface. His drawing 
ability is superb. 



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Lafene can help with feelings of blamt 



Write to Ctwandri, 
H6 Kediie Hall, 
Manhattan, Kan. 
66506. 



Dear Cassandra, 

I went out with this guy 
a few times a couple of 
years ago. He was 10 years 
older than me, but I tried to 
ignore it. My problem is 
that 1 slept with him, but 
it's not what you think. I 
said no several times, but 
he continued and would not 
slop. Once things got start- 
ed, I did not try to stop him. 
For a long time, 1 thought I 
encouraged him, and it was 
my fault, but I don't know 
anymore. I don't know if it 
was rape or my own fault 
for encouraging it and not 



trying hard enough to stop 
it. What I want to know is 
was it rape or did I get 
myself into this mess? This 
is eating me up on the 
inside, and I don't know 
what to believe. 

Signed, 

Biggest mistake of my life 

Dear Mistake, 

I think you are looking 
for a legal confirmation that 
the actions this man took 
were rape. But I don't think 
this is necessary. Clearly, 
this whole ordeal bothers 



you whether it was rape or 
not. 

I think you should sit 
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selor at Lafene Health 
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your feelings of blame. The 
counselor will also help 
you figure out how you can 
prevent a situation like this 
from happening again. If it 
makes you feel uncomfort- 
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friend. Call 532-6927 for an 
appointment. The service 
offers five free sessions for 
students per year. 



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■j Q Tii««d«y. April 12. 1004 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



I 



Hlrothi Han i 

professor of 
architecture at the 
University o( 
Tokyo, shows 
slides to 
architecture 
students Monday 
afternoon in 
Union Forum Hall. 

CJWV COMOVM 

Collegian 




Speaker dispels higher education myths 



"Sometime*, 
people get 
better as they 
get older — 
like the 
vintage 
effect." 
Ernest PtfCaJMUA 
Policy Studies 
professor 
at U of I In Chicago 



CHRtSTI WRIOHT 



Some popular beliefs 
about higher edu- 
cation aren't sup- 
ported by much 
evidence, a University of 
Illinois professor said in 
Union Forum Hall 
Monday. 

Ernest T. Pascarella. who teaches 
policy studies at the University of 
Illinois in Chicago, discussed his 
research and his book, "How College 
Affects Students," in the Chester E. 
Peters Lecture in Student Develop- 
ment. 

Pascarella said he got started on his 
book by considering the myths about 
college. 

"I thought a lot of the things people 
said about higher education might not 
be true," Pascarella said. 

Many things seem rational and are 
assumed to be true, he said. 

Pascarella and his colleague, Patrick 



T. Terenzini, decided to question the 
rational myths and see when and how 
they became misleading. 

Pascarella discussed and debated 1 1 
myths he encountered in his eight 
years of research on the effect of col- 
lege on students. 

His research covered a wide variety 
of topics ranging from test scores to 
homogeneous black universities to the 
quality of teachers. 

Pascarella talked about the myth 
that the effect of college affects test 
scores. He said things other than col- 
lege can affect a person. 

"Sometimes, people get better as 
they get older — like the vintage 
effect," Pascarella said. "But, there's 
nothing wrong with people that don't 
change, either. 

"It is true that people leave college 
with about the same quantitative skills 
they had when they left high school. 
The people who don't go to college 
will actually lose some of their quanti- 
tative skills." 

Pascarella also discussed the myth 
that historically black colleges don't 
provide as useful an education for 
black students as predominately white 



colleges won Id 

He also said there is no difference 
in the education received from a homo- 
geneous black or women's college. 

"African Americans might even 
benefit from the segregation because it 
is a stress- free environment without 
racism," Pascarella said. "Perhaps not 
all blacks would benefit from a black 
college, but there are benefits." 

One audience member said she 
attended an all-female college. 

"I went to an all women's college, 
and 1 found a lot of value in a small 
school," Aruna Michie, associate pro- 
fessor in political science, said. 

"There was a lot more interaction 
between students and professors, and 
that was traditional then. In our dorm, 
it was normal to invite the professors 
over for dinner." 

Pascarella said the higher education 
system as a whole is always changing. 
"People don't realize how fast the 
demographic force is changing," 
Pascarella said. 

At the University of Illinois. 23 
percent of the student body is Asian 
American, which is the largest percent- 
age on campus. 



Soldiers to train 
with Russians 



Former enemies 
plan joint practice 
manuevers 



MOSCOW — The Americans 
are corning! 

Some 250 U.S. troops will hold 
joint maneuvers this summer with 
the Russian military, the first such 
exercises on Russian soil. 

Monday's announcement sig- 
naled that despite differences over 
Yugoslavia and other issues, Russia 
and the United Stales want to con- 
tinue moving away from the tense 
decades of Cold War confrontation. 

Now, instead of planning for war 
on the plains of Europe, they are 
holding military exercises to help 
prepare for future U.N. peacekeep- 
ing operations. 

Some Russians, however, remain 
wary of military cooperation with 
their longtime adversary, the United 
States, which sent 10.000 soldiers 
to Russia in 1918 in a failed attempt 
to crush the Bolshevik Revolution. 

Vladimir Zhirinovsky and other 
nationalists have denounced the 
planned exercises as a sinister 
American plot to undermine Russia. 

"We know how they have been 
hatching plans for attacking Russia 
for nearly 50 years," Zhirinovsky 
told the State Duma last Friday, 
"We're against any joint military 
exercises on Russia's territory with 
any foreign army. 

"No foreign army here! That's 
all aimed at destroying the Russian 



state." 

Nationalists in parliament 
oppose Russia's entry into NATO's 
Partnership for Peace program and 
are outraged by the prospect of 
American troops training on 
Russian soil. 

The weeklong exercises in July, 
involving 250 officers and soldiers 
on each side, will help prepare for 
future United Nations peacekeeping 
operations. Defense Ministry 
spokesman Vyacheslav Sedov said. 

The troops will come from 
Russia's 27th Motorized Rifle 
Division and the U.S. Army's 3rd 
Infantry Division, he said. 

"There will be no mock combat, 
since it is not called for by the 
peacekeepers' mandate, and they 
will not shoot a single live round," 
Sedov said. 

Maj. Gen. Anatoly Sidyakin, 
commander of the 27th Motorized 
Rifle Division, told the ITAR-Tass 
news agency that the goal of the 
exercise is "learning to seek politi- 
cal solutions to conflicts." 

He called U.S.-Russian coopera- 
tion "inevitable." 

The exercises will be held near 
the town of Totskoye. about 435 
miles east of Moscow, The site was 
used for a 1954 above-ground 
nuclear test involving Soviet army 
servicemen, but Sedov said the 
level of radiation is not dangerous. 

Partnership for Peace allows for- 
mer Soviet bloc Warsaw Pact mem- 
bers to take part in peacekeeping, 
military exercises and other NATO 
activities, but without membership 
in NATO. 



Shuttle radar offers view of 
Earth history, environment 



CAPE CANAVERAL. Fta. — 
The most advanced radar ever sent 
into space by NASA peered 
beneath the sand of the Sahara 
Desert Monday for traces of ancient 
river channels- and lost civilizations. 

Two days into the 10-day flight, 
the radar aboard space shuttle 
Endeavour had mapped about 3 
million square miles of Earth's sur- 



face, an area equivalent to half the 
United States. 

After some initial difficulty, the 
$366 million worth of radar equip- 
ment is providing unprecedented 
three-dimensional maps of deserts, 
mountains, oceans and cropland. 

Scientists hope these images will 
help them better understand envi- 
ronmental changes and provide the 
world's policy makers with ways to 
preserve Earth. 




LASSIFIEDS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



OUR BASK RATI 

To run 20 wort* or I*** tor on* day 
I* IS. For mod wort vm »J*M« 
ptw word. Cwl 5**-to55 fof conpicuuvt 
d#yr ' 



DEADLINES 



HOW TO PAY 



OaaeJfladsd* must be placed by All deaaffleda MM bt patd In 

noon Uw day betor* *e data the M advanc* unless you have en 

runt. CISMifad display idi mult be mBBmt account MR MM 

placed by 4 pjn.teoaartfjrig days PuNie*tic«.C**Kch*c<eia»tarCert 

bslors ths date tha *d runs. rxvl»* era accepted. 



. Call 532-6555 
to place your classified. 



000 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 



Announcements 



ACCC AS ALUMNI RE 
UNION. tat, April 
IB, 2:30p.m. Col- 
lego Farm. For mora 

Information contact 
Tarry Powelaon or Bac 
Nilgaa. (3161365 5U6 



ADVANCED FLIGHT Train- 
ing. Multiengine pri- 
vate, commercial, or 
ATP In Twin Comancrti 
with HSl, AMI, GPS, 
Storm Scop*. Hugh 1r- 
vfn, 539 3128 



COME FLV with us, K-State 
Flying Club hat tour alt- 
plan at. For beat prices 
call Sam Knlpp, 638 

61 93 attar 6:30p.m 

DON'T LOSS track of 



Buy a Campus Direc- 
tory today. Available In 
103 Kadiia. $2 with 
•tudent ID, $3 25 with 
(acuity/ staff ID, $4 Oth- 
er*. bMM OMm 
plaaia purchaee from 
KSU Office Suppllaa at 
the Union Bookstore. 



LOSE ALL the walgm you 
can In April for FRIH 
Food not included. Call 
Nulri/5y«t*m (or da 
ten*. 776^6900. 



Personal* 



Wo require ■ form of 
picture ID IKIU. drlv 
•r'a license or other! 
when placing a par 



DENNIS: GOOD luck On 
Fine Arte Council a I ac- 
tion. You are the beat I 
Susan. 

SUSAN w We want to 
with you a Happy Birth- 
day. Have a nice day 
We love you. Mom- 
Dad- Speedy. 

060 1 



Parttes-n-More 



CREATE HOT wel memo- 
rlee with your next par- 
ty. Wet N Wild Mobile 
Hot Tub Hentala. Year 
round availability 537 
1825 



100 



HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 




APARTMENTS, MOBILE 
Home*, no com planar 
Furniahed, unfurnished 
10 or 12-month lease* 
June or Aug. No par 
lie*, no pet*. 537-8389. 

AUGUST LEASE- next lo 
oampua, ecroaa Mai tan 
and Qoodnow Hall 
(1832 Claflinl one/ 



two-bod room. 
539-2702 evening*/ 
meiaage. 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1. Large 
two-bedroom apart- 
ment. 1400 519 Oaage 
water/ trash paid, duh 
washer, garbage dispo- 
sal, low utilities, 
778-2393 

AVAILABLE NOW, sum 
mar and tail. Very nice 
two, three and 
four-bedroom apart- 
ment complexes and 
houses. Near campus 
with great prlcaa. 
537-1666, 537-2919. 

OANDY ONE, two, three. 
•nd four-bedrooms. 
Close to campus Wash 
er and dryer in most. 
Available June 1. Rea- 
sonable 539-9345 

FOR AUG. Next to KSU. De- 
luxe two-bedroom 
apartment, 1485 Pay 
only electric. 539-2482, 
after 4p.m. 

FOR RENT, two roome, 
non-smoking, partly 
furnished, trash paid, 
one fourth utilities. 
Cloae to campus, call 
637-8764. 

LARGE TWO and 

three-bedroom apart- 
ments close to campua, 
Aggievilte and City 
Park. Available June 1. 
539-1713. 

LARGE TWO- three-bed 
room apartment 10 
minute walk from See- 
ton Hall. With washer/ 
dryer 220 eir condition, 
S650/ month. Call 
537-7142 (pete • 
maybe) 

NEAR KSU summer lease 
only. Nice two-bed- 
room basement apart 
ment. $300. S39-2462, 
after 4p.m. 

ONE-BEDROOM STUDIO 
In complex. 1219 Cledin 
next to campus, S3 10 
plus electric, plus de- 



posit. Aug. year lease, 
no pets, 537- 



-1180 



TWO, THREE and 

four-bedroom Very 
good condition. Wind- 
ow eir, ga* haet end 
carpeted. Available in 
June. 537-7334. 

TWO STORY duplex with 
patio. One and one-harf 
block* east of Ford Hall, 
two full bathrooms, 
four off -street parking 
stalls. 1401 McCain 
1600 par month. 
539-7693 

TWO-BE0R00M, LUXURI- 
OUS apartment* neer 
campus and opposite 
city park at 1200 Fre- 
mont for June or Au- 
gust. Carpeted, central 
air, dishwasher and dis 
poaal. No peta. $486 
537-0428. 

UNUSUALLY LARGE near 
new duplex. Three-bed- 
room, two bath adja- 
cent campua. beeutrrul- 
fy fumlthed. No peta or 
smoking. Stockwell 
Real Estate. 539-4073. 




1218 KEARNEY one-bed- 
room. Water/ trash 
paid. No pels. Year 
lease beginning June 1. 
1325 pet month, 
538-5136. 

814 THURSTON atudio wa- 
ter/ trash paid. No pat*/ 
smokers June 1 leasa. 
$270. Call 639-5138. 

AVAILABLE IMME 

DtATELY, nice two-bad 
room. 817 N. 12th, 

4675, water, treah paid. 
Cloae to campua 776- 
3804 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1. 

One-bedroom 1340. 
two-bedroom 1510 
1886 College Height*. 



Water/ trash paid Close 
to campua. 778-3804 

AVAILABLE MAY 1, 
one-bedroom. 1024 
Laramie $325 Including 
all utilities, one-year 
lease, no pets. Also ona 
and two-bedroom for 
Aug. the Housing Co. 
539-2255 



AVCVST LEASES 

aj ejajej l|iu. '^mltton* tyi* 

•Gafaai lfe*ku 

Larar 1 BniriKiiM l'nn» 

> i:-'mf>i 

VrAaimy V » m -4:311 p.m. 



AVAILABLE NOW, 

one-bedroom 1022 
Sunaet, 1345 Water/ 
trash paid. Close to 
campus. 776-3804. 




1509S1S09'/:Fairchild 



2 blocks to campus 

LARGE i-bodroom unite 

Laundry Room 

Qtf stnai parking 

June io June Lease 
S340VMO 

Call to view 

537-4770 

Arlen Carlson 



AVAILABLE NOW, sum- 
mer and faH. Very nice 
two, three and 
four-bedroom apart- 



ment complexes end 
houses. Near campus 
with great prices. 
537-1668, 637-2919 

AVAILABLE NOW, 

three- bed room, close 
to City Pa»k. 300 N. 
11th, $435 Upstairs 

unit. Water/ tra*h paid 
776-380*. 

AVAILABLE NOW, 

two-bedroom by City 
Park. 1028 Oiaga. $495 
Water/ trath paid. 
778-3804 

AVAILABLE NOW Spa- 
cious two-bedroom. 
Cloae to campu*. 1829 
College Heights. $680. 
Water/ trssh paid. 
778-3804 

CHASE MANHATTAN 
APARTMENTS OFF- 
ERS YOU ALL THE 
COMFORTS Of NfWh 

modern interiors, dish 
weshert, microwave*, 
clubhouse with swim- 
ming pool. Sun deck, 
laundry, lounge, and 
wotkoul facilities In- 
eluding slalrmasters, 
exercise bikes, weights, 
and TVl Occupancy 
nearing 100 percent. 
Oon't misa oult Call to- 
deyl 776-3883. 

JUNE AND Aug. availabili- 
ty. One, two and 
four-bedroom 1017- 
1029 McCollum $365- 
$800. Close to campu*. 
778-3804. 

LARGE THREE BEDROOM 
apartment $185 each. 
Available Aug 1. 637- 
7087. 

NICE TWO-BEOROOM 
apartment. Available 
June 1, neat and clean, 
pool, hot tub, only 
$436/ month. Call Amy 
or Lisa, 5390938, leave 



NOW LEASING for Aug. 
1001 Bluemonl $780. 
Very large two-bed- 
room, two bath. Nice 
unite. Cloae to Ag- 
gieville. 776-3804. 




PARKING 

OF THE 



•5 p.m. (except holidays) 



OfiSWTtCOLLMUII 



MdZM K»i 103, 



ONE-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE April 15. 1222 
Laramie $325. All utili- 
ties paid. Cloae to cam- 
pua. 776-3804. 

ONE-BEDROOM BASE 
MENT apartment B20 
Osage $210. Available 
April 15. Water/ trash 
paid. 776-3804 

OVERLOOK CAMPUS, two 
bedroom , dishwasher, 
fireplace, laundry facili- 
ty. Available Aug. 1. 
$610. 537 2255 

PARK PLACE APART 
MENTS Now pre-lee*- 
Ing ona, two and 
three-oedrooms. 
538-2861 

SPACIOUS TWO-BED- 
ROOM apartment al 
Woodwey. Modern ap- 
pliances, low utilities, 
ceiling fen. For Aug. 1 
leaaa. Call 778-7950 
after 5pm. 

TWO-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE in June. 1 126 Fre- 
mont $610. Trash paid. 
Dfahwaaher, garbage 
disposal, laundry fecili- 
Ilea on-elte. Close lo 
City Park and Ag- 
gieville. 778-3804. 

TWO-BEOROOM, CLOSE 
to campua. Available 
Aug. 1, no pels. 
638-2661. 

TWO THREE-BEDROOMS 

one and one-half bath, 
central air, laundry, 
near campus, available 
June or Aug. 537-8800. 

TWO BEDROOM APART- 
MENT, one end one- 
half bath, central air, 
laudry facilities Alao 
three bedroom in a 
houee available in June 
and Aug, 778-8725 

VERY NICE four-bedroom 
hous* available May 1. 
1817 College Heights. 
$1200. All utllitlee paid 
Close to campus. 
778-3804. 



VERY NICE. Nexl to cam- 

flue. Ona, two, three, 
Our-bedroom house* 
and apartment* with 
washer/ dryer cenlral 
air $335- $900 537-8543 



FOR RENT: one or 
two-bedrooms of a 
house. Close to cam- 
pus. Rant S138. Laun- 
dry. June 1 leaaa. Call 
Sara or Kelly et 
776-8740. 



FOUR-BEDROOM UNFUR- 
NISHED house, June 
539-1975. 



NON-DRINKING AND 

smoking, for two and 
three-bed room places. 
No pot*. References. 
639-1564. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, two- 
bedroom with kitchen, 
option for next year, 
near campus, available 
now, $400/ month nego- 
tiable. 537 5023 mes- 
sage Dave, Yu. 

THREE-BEDROOM 

HOUSE, new waaher/ 
dryer, dishwasher, cen- 
tral air, heet. Close to 
campus. 639-2914. 



OUIT PA VINO MINT I 
Nice older home cur- 
rently duplex. Three 
bedrooms plu* and *tu- 
dlo with HW/ solar. 
Convert* lo large home 
or stay a* I* and EARN 
M NT Cloae lo park. 



downtown and KSU. 
Student* take Ihi* to 
your parents. 1-800- 
593 0519. After 7p.m. 
Priced in the 50' s 



Fori 

Mobile Home* 

12X55 GREAT Lake*. Re- 
cently remodeled 
Mejor appliance* stay. 
Very good condition. 
Fenced in yard, pet* al- 
lowed. Low lot rani. 
776-3135. 

1992 CHAMPION Mobile 
Home, three- bed room, 
two bath, central heat 
and air, deck, storage 
shed, appliances, 
off-street parking, ap 
proximataly $375/ 
month, located in Colo- 
nial Gardens. 778-3433. 

COUNTRYSIDE BROKER- 
AGE will sail your mo- 
bile home for you. We 
have tanleitlc results. 
We do our own financ- 
ing. Call 539-2325. 



Roommate 
Wanted 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 

wanted to share apart 
man! with athletic fe- 
male, starting; In May 
or Aug. Very nice apart- 
ment off campus; own 
room; swimming pool. 
$232.50/ month plua 
one-half utilities 
637-6043 ask for Kethy 

FEMALE ROOMMATES for 
four-bedroom/ two 
bathroom Own room, 
washer/ dryer. Fall/ 

spring/ summer avail- 
able. Very cloae to cam- 
pus. Some peta i 
ed 537-4685 

MALE ROOMMATES need- 
ed to share a three-bed- 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



*<— day, April 12, 1994 «j -| 



Collegian Classifieds 



room house Cill S39 
37 IB . ask for Mark. 

MALE/ FEMALE room mat* 
needed tor summer. 
Own bedroom, Nical 
Next to campus, Jt50 
plus utilities. Call Dave 
at S87-0726 

NON- SMOKER TO lhara 

four-bedroom house. 
cloee to campu*. 1180 * 
month plui one-fourth 
light, cab)* and phone. 
Must have a same of 
humor. Call 776-0847 
or 512-7244 

ROOMMATE NEEDED lor 

two-bedroom. 
Non-emoker. 1225 par 
month, ploa one-half 
utilillea. Naar cimpm. 
770-6080. Ask for Hen- 



nOOMMATE NEEDED to 
■ hara live-bedroom 
houa*. S160 par month 
plus one-fifth utilities. 
Cloee to campu*. Call 
537-1621. 

ROOMMATE WANTED: 

male or female Share 
three-bedroom, pool- 
aide apartment with 
two male roommate*. 
Fall 94- spring 95 S2 1 tt' 
month plua one-third 
utilities. Non-emoker 
Call Brian 532-5184 or 
Mike 532-5492 

WANTED NON-SMOKING 
and non-drinking mala 
for baaament furnished 
private bedroom. Walk 
lo KSU. $150. Share 
utilities 539-1554. 



1829 COLLEGE Height*. 
Summer sublease 
two-badroom, fully fur- 
nished, dlahwaiher. 
central air. Up to four 
people Rant negoti 
able Cell 539-6695. 

A OEALI One-bedroom 
901 Kearney. Close (o 
campu*. One fourth 
water plus KPL. central 
air, new appliance* off 
street parking, non- 
smoking, 5300/ month 
mid/ lata May- Aug. 
537-8613. 

A LARGE two bed 

room, furnished apart- 
ment, iust north of the 
'VIII* and eait of cam- 
pu*. Call 776-8261. 

AVAILABLE MID MAY 

Aug. Subleasers reed 
ad tor two-badroom 
apartment Close to 
campu*/ Aggie villa Fur- 
nished with washer and 
dryer. Rent negotiable. 
778-4039. 

DESPERATELY NEED fa- 
male to sublease Wood 
way. four-bedroom. 
Half prical 5100/ 
month. New pool. Avail- 
able May IS. Laurie, 
587-0598. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed Mid-May to 
July 31. May rent paid. 
Wood way Apartment*. 
$190 plus one-fourth 
utilities. Call Ann 
537-1489. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed. Available 
mid-May to July 31. 
May rant is paid Wood 
way Apartments. 1150 
plu* one-third utilities. 
Call Michelle 770-7151 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

needed mid-May to 
July 31. May is free 
Wood way Apartments. 
$150 plus one-third mil- 
itias. Call 587-0123. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to 
sublease three-bed- 
room apartment 
Aero** the street from 
campus. Own room. 
Rant negotiable. Call 
for detail* 539-3639. 

FEMALES NEEDED for 
three-bedroom. Water, 
trash paid. $150/ month 
plus one-third utilities. 
Off-street parking. 
Close to campus 
539-3091. 

FOR SUMMER, on* room 
in three-bedroom 
apartment at $170 a 
month plu* on* -fourth 
utilities Call alter 7pm, 
ask for Amy 539-6492. 



FURNISHED ONE BED 
ROOM apartment 
Close to campu*, air- 
conditioning. Available 
mid-May to Auguit. 
Ranto negotiable Call 
537-9633 or leave mes- 



HOT DAYS, need new 
pool. We need summer 
*ubl*aa*r(*l for 

three-bedroom at 
Woodwsy. furniture/ 
rant negotiable. Call 
532-21 26 or 532-2375. 

JUNE AND July sublease. 
Nice, clean two-bad- 
room, one bath. Wash- 
er/ dryer Clo»e to cam 
pua. Call 776-3144. 

MALE/ FEMALE roommate 
needed for summer 
with option for longer. 
Free waihar/ dryer. 
Close to AggieviHe 
Walk to campu*. $200 
plu* one-fourth utili- 
ties 776-4146 leave 
message for Chris 

NICE TWO-BEDROOM. 
1326 N. Manhattan, 
May or June until July 
31. No pet* $526. 776- 
7998. 

NON SMOKING FEMALE 
needed to share fur 
nithed two-bedroom 
apartment. Own room. 
Rant negotiable plu* 
on* third utilities Avail- 
able mid-May through 
mid -August Great I oca 
lion. Call 776-0877 

NON-SMOKING FEMALE 
to iuble*** mid-May to 
Aug. Two-badroom 
$210 plu* one half utili- 
ties two block* from 
campu* 539-4266. 

ONE-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT. Available from 
May 1- July 31. Rant is 
$300. One Nock from 

campu*. Please call 
587-01 17 after 6pm. 

ONE-BEDROOM SUB- 
LEASE June and Jury at 
Park Place $330 a 

month. Two pools Can 
renew lease. Call Mike 
at 539-3556 

ONE-BEDROOM. LOW 

rant, one-third utilities, 
with pool. From May 
to Aug. 776-0665, Ja- 
nka. 

ONE SLOCK from campus. 
Furnished. Di*hw**fier 
waihar/ dryer. Own 
room May 12 to July 
31. No pat*. 776-9859, 
Heather. 

ONE. TWO or three-bed- 
rooms available In 
three-bedroom apart- 
ment. On* and 
one-half bath*. Sum- 
mar 1019 Fremont 
537-4446. 

PERSONS NEEDED for 

Summer. Available 
mid-May to July or 
maybe sooner. Price I* 
negotieble. Ask for 
Kate, Karen or Leslie at 
539-6492 

SPEND SUMMER In Ag- 
gieviHe. Call or leave 
message. All things ne- 
gotieble. 539-5918. 

SUBLEASE ONE or 
two-bedrooms avail- 
able. Furnished or un 
furnished. One-third 
utilities Paying $170. 
but willing to take loss 
537-8913. 

SUBLEASE ONE-BED 
ROOM Of two-bed 
room apartment in 
quiet building. Avail- 
able now- July 31. All 
utilities paid, except 
electric, central air, cat* 
allowed. Call 539-8506 

SUBLEASE, THREE-BED- 
ROOM in Woodwey for 
June and July. New 
pool. $450 a month or 
best offer. 776-6662. 

SUBLEASE. MALE needed 
for e four-bedroom 
apartment in Fremont 
and Sixth Street. Unfur- 
niihad. Immediately. 
$100 plua one-fourth 
utilities. Call 776-7158 
after 5pm. 

SUMMER DEALI One-bed 
room house on* and 
one half block* from 
campus. All bill*, •■- 
cept phone. $226. Ga- 
rage, waihar/ dryer, 
dishwasher. Mid May 
thru Aug. 776-1862. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 
larg«, two-badroom 



I 



THE BORDER 15 
JV5T THE BEGINNING! 

habtont Monoo* i $21-281 

Kawset City Aim 

The beginning of an **dttna choAengtng and 
rewording career wait Toco bell o 137 baton 
division of the prestigious Fortune 30 PepsiCo 
W* hove management opportunities lor bright 
business professionals who are secure and serf 
assured thai they hay* what t lakes lo aiiiisaslil, 
monag* a mston dollar plus binm*M, H you or* 
an •aerpettc. setf-mfftcienl individual and con 
fate an the dwisnga at of day lo doy operations; 
human resources, marketing, pubfcc relations and 
Pe*. monogemenl. you wit S u c ce ed wth usl 

ConaVJate* should have * » c*lent supervisory, 
cognitive and Interpersonal skill. Eipetksnce In 
tourctng and building employ** learns al ol 
levels with a bodtaround in relatl. sales, or food 
service desirable. BAAS preferred. 

Our rewards are tremendous. Induing salary 
commensvas* w*h emparlance lucrattv* bonus pro- 
gram and a benefits package thai mdude* our 
unique slack option program ShcrePcwer Our 
gmokss t benefit it the opportunely lor exciting 
career growth, hrjbcshg eS* potential lo manage 
rrMRple kxatton* 

K you're ready to accept Ih* choleng* of working 
with a dynarMc cwporotton. place* send your 
resume to: Taw* Oefl, Attn KC, 360 W. 
«Wt1erft*4d laL $•*• 300 llmhw*t. It 
601J6. EOF. WF/D/V 



apartment; two block* 
from campu*, one and 
one half block* from 
AggieviHe; rent negoti- 
able; call 776-3483. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 
roommate needed, 
own room $200/ month 
plus utilities, washer/ 
dryer, close to campus 
and Vat Mad. 537-1681. 

SUMMER SU8LEASE- 
Spacloua two-badroom 
apartment. 

Non-smokers only. 
539-4909. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 
Two-bedroom house 
just scross strait from 

Arby's on Bluamont, 
Available mid-May. Call 
776-8667 and leave 
message 

SUMMER SUBLEASE in 
Royal Tower* to lhare 
furnished four-bed- 
room apartment May 
Aug. Price negotiable 
Csll539-6614 

SUMMER SUBLEASE. 

one-bedroom $240/ 
month acroaa from 
Ahaarn Natatorlum 
776-6278. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, two 
bedroom partially fur- 
nished, closa to campus 
and AggieviHe. June/ 
July $315/ month, utili 
tin and deposit 539 
9123. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE. Fa- 
male to share four-bed 
room apartment in 
Royal Towers. Own 
room close to campu*. 
Available thru July 31. 
$175/ month. Call 
Heather 776-3550. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE. 
Newly remodeled, atu- 
dlo with sundeck. One 
block from campu* and 
AggieviHe Com pi ate I y 
furniahed. Vary nice, 
clean, and convenient. 
$290 537-4391, 

SUMMER SUBLEASE: Fur- 
nished one-bad room, 
two block* from cam- 
pu*, available mid-May 
through Aug., water 
and traah paid, rent ne- 
gotiable call 687-0669. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE: 

Lsrge. furnished 

one-badroom baaa- 
ment, one-half block 
from campu*. Quiet, 
non-smokers wanted. 
537-2962. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE: 
two-badroom fur- 
nished apartment, two 
blocks from AggieviHe, 
closa to campu*. Rant 
negotiable Available 
mid-May through July 
31. 776-6098 

SUMMER SUBLEASE: very 
nice three-bedroom 
apartment one block 
from campu* and one 
block from AggieviHe 
Available mid-May 
through August. Very 
reasonable rant. 537- 
3572 



SUMMERTIME SUB- 

LEASE. Three-bed 
rooma available from 
mid-May to Aug. 1. 
$150/ month plu* 
one-fourth utilities 
Laundry facility, water 
and trash paid, no pat*. 
Call after 5p.m. at 
539-9147 

THREE BEDROOM / two 
bath, available May 14. 
close to campus/ Ag- 
gieviHe. For into call 
537-8061 

THREE-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT lor summar, 
closa lo campu*. wash- 
er and dryer, lots of 
room, price negotiable 
call 539-2654 

THREE SPACIOUS bad 
rooms, one and 
one-half bathe, 913 
Bluamont, June 1- July 
31, near villa' and cam- 
pua. Laundry, parking 
$180. 776-5616. 

VERY NICE two-bedroom 
apartment. Right next 
to campus Mid- May 
to July 31. Price nego- 
tieble 537-3064 



GET 



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OUT. 



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DIRECTORY 



IffilM. 



RESUME RESUME RE- 
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other word processing 
needs Laaar printing. 
Call Brand*. 776-3290. 

WORD PROCESSING dona 
In my home. Papers, 
resumes, letters, re- 
ports, theses, etc. Con- 
tact Carol anytime at 
776-4398. 

WOHDPROCESSING SUP- 
PORT for your acade- 
mic and professions! 
needs Papers, 

resumes, letters, re- 
port*. Contact Peggie 
(evenings I at 539-1 191 



Pregnancy 
Twtlnfj 



i*i"i'liii;UK'\ 

lesting ( enter 

539-3338 

•I '.-. j'i. ii.tlk\ 



■■ i >iiluk'illl, 



■N I k - 1 Lis HXllfs 

•i .ill It* .l|'|1i|lllllKlll 
i 

; 

■ l.i.v 



2501 



NISSAN- DATSUN Repair 
Service, 22 year* ex- 
perience. Maidaa, Hon 
da* and Toyotas also 
Auto Craft, 2612 Dipper 
Lane, Manhattan, Kan- 
sas. 537-5049. 8a.m.- 
5p.m. Mon.- Fri, 



2M| 

Other 



INTERNATIONAL STUD- 
ENTS: DV-1 Greencard 
Program. Sponsored 
by U.S. Immigration. 
Greencards provide 
U.S. permanent reii 
dent statu* Citizen* of 
almost all countries are 
allowed. For informa- 
tion and forms: New 
Era Legal Service*, 
20231 Stagg St., Cano 
ga Park. CA 91306, Tel: 
[8181772-7198; 
(818)998-4425 Mon - 
Sun.: 10a.m.- 11p.m. 



PROMPT CONTRACEPTIVE 
and abortion services. 
Dal* L. Clinton, M.D., 
Lawrence, 
(913WJ41-57I6. 



Insurance 



HEALTH AND Auto cov 

erage Call us before 
purchasing The Uni- 
versity Health Plan, Tim 
L. Engle Agency 3528 
Kimball Ave. (Candle- 
wood Shopping Cen- 
ter) 537-4661. KSU 
grad 1988. 



3010 



EMPLOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 



HotpWsvitsKl 



The Collegian cannot 
verity the financial po- 
tential of advertise 
minis In the Employ- 
ment/Career classifies 
tlon. Readers are ad 
vised to approach any 
euch employment op 
portunity with reason 
able caution- Tha Col- 
legian urges our read- 
era to contact (he Bet 
tor Buaineee Bureau, 
■Of «E Jaffarson, To 
pake, KS 66607 It BO 
(913,132-0*64 

1995 CALENDAR Con- 
teat, Send photos lo 
P.O. Box 491, Manhst 
tan. KS 66502 or call 
776-5649. 

AEROBICS- EARN money, 
while you exercise. In- 
structor training 
courie- April 23 and 
30, 1994 (816)561 6933 

ALASKA SUMMER EM- 
PLOYMENT- fiaher 
lea. Many earn $2000 
plu*/ month in canner- 
ies or $3000- $6000 
plu*/ month on fishing 
venal*. For informa- 
tion call: (2061545-4155 
axl AS768 

ATTENTION GREEKS: 126- 
year- old firm has 20 
spots available tor sum 
mar work. Make excel- 
lent career contacts for 
future job searches, 
over $1,500 per month, 
real world experience 
For information call I 
800 840 2840 

ATTENTION: STUDENTS. 

Full-time summar em- 
ployment, 40- 50 hours 
par weak. Must be 18 
year* and have two 
ID.'* (driver'*, S.S. or 
State I.D.). Driven, 
packers, and helper* 
needed. Apply In per- 
son, Coleman Ameri- 
can Moving Services 
-615 S. 11th in Manhst 
tan. 

CAMP COUNSELORS 

wanted for private 
Michigan boy*/ girl* 
summer camp*. Teach: 
Swimming, canoeing. 
Bailing, w«t*r*kilng, 
gymnaatlc*. rtfl*ry. 
archery, tennis, golf. 
sports, computers, 
camping, craft*, 

dramatics, or riding. 
Alio kitchen, office, 
maintenance. Salary 
$1150 or more plu* 
RflrB Camp LWC/GWC. 
1766 Maple. Northheld, 
IL 60093 (708 K46- 2444 

COMPUTER "NETWORK 
Administrator Assis- 
tant- part-time stud 
ant poettkm. mostly 
regularly scheduled 
hour* with limited 
emergency trou- 

bleshooting hour*. As* 
Ists in overseeing 
55 compute* Macin 
tosh network. Including 
troubleshooting, hard- 
ware maintenance, soft 
ware backup*, and 
records maintenance. 
Should be familiar with 
Macintosh operating 
system* 6 and 7 and 



have good general 
knowledge of Macin- 
tosh software Network 
experience with local- 
talk and etharnet pre- 
'erred Bask hardware 
and software trou- 
bleshooting skills need- 
ed. Minimum wage. Po- 
sition to itart earfy Au- 
guat. Pick up applies 
tlon at 113 Kedila Ap 

Plication deadline is 
p.m. on Frl., April 
IB. tr 



CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIR- 
ING- Earn up to $2,000 
plus/ month working on 
Cruise Ship* or Land- 
Tour companies. World 
travel. Summar and 
Full-time employment 
available. No experi- 
ence necessary. For 
mora information call 1- 
206-634-0468 ext, CS768. 

DELIVERY DRIVERS want- 
ad for the KC Metro 
Area. Put your vehicle 
to work for you. Full- 
time days, great sum- 
mer Job. Call Quick De- 
livery (9131888-8627. 

EARN OVER $100/ hour 
processing our mail at 
home. For information. 
Call (2021310-5958. 

HARVEST HELP wanted. 
Need combine and 
truck driver* lor sum- 
mer wheat harveit. 
Board, room, and good 
pay. Horn* before 
school start*. 

(9131877-209*. 

HELP WANTED lor custom 
harveit- combine op- 
erator* and truck driv 
era. Experience pre- 
ferred. Call 
1303)483-7490 evenings. 

HIRING NOW: FONE Crial* 
Center Assistant Coor- 
dinator. Student work- 
ing towards bachelor* 
or graduate degree in 
Human Service;' Social 
Science, leadership and 
crisis intervention ex- 
perience preferred. Du- 
ties: scheduling of vol- 
unteer*, coverage of 
shifts. Including holi- 
day*, training volun- 
teer* and back up. Eith- 
er eat up a* hourly or 
assisfanceship Apply 
•t the SGA office Dead 
lino: April 15, 1994 

INTERNATIONAL EM- 
PLOYMENT- Make up 
10 $2000- $40000 plus/ 
month teaching basic 
conversational English 
in Japan. Taiwan, or S. 
Korea. No teaching 
background or Asian 
languages required. For 
information call: 

(206)632-1146 
*xU5768. 

LABORERS NEEDED lor 
construction work. 
Start immediately Call 
(913)641-6347 

LABORERS NEEDED. Lafid 
•capo and retaining 
wall experience re- 
quired. Start imme- 
diately, call 
(9131841-6347 

NANNIES WANTED- Poll 
tion* nationwide, sum- 
mer or year round, ex- 
perience not required. 
Great pay and benefits, 
free travel. 

(612)643-4399. 

NEWSPAPER. ADVER- 
TISMO BALES Mont 
gomary Publication* 
hi* an opening tor an 
advertising sales repre- 
sentative lo service ac- 
counts in our multi -pub- 
lication area. Must be 
responsible, wall- or 
ganited self ttarlar 



who can produce rs- 
suits with minimal su- 
pervision. Previous 
madia sale* experience 
preferred. Baas salary 
plus commission and 
mileage allowance. 
Send resume IN CON- 
FIDENCE to Dally 
Union. P.O. Box 129. 
Junction City, Kansaa 
66441 or file out appli- 
cation at 222 West 6th 
Street. 

NON-SMOKING DAYCARE 
provider wanted for 
two kid* ages 2 and 5, 
Part-time or full-time. 
776-0881. 

PART-TIME HELP wanted 
Little Ceaaara Plua. 
Morning and evening 
shifts Competitive 
wages for cook and 
cashier positions. 
Apply In person, con- 
tact Nikki. 539-3333 

PART-TIME MAIN- 

TENANCE person need- 
ed May 15 for 60 apart- 
ment*, basic plumbing. 
electrical, and carpen- 
try skill* needed, fie 
spend to P.O. Box 1286 
Manhattan. 

RILEY COUNTY has an as 
needed part-time 112 
18 hour*/ weak) posi- 
tion to work with PC us- 
ers, could be full-time 
Summer. Require* PC 
knowledge with DOS, 
Window*, help desk 
and database develop- 
ment experience. De- 
sire experience with (ha 
following applications: 
Word. Excel, Lotus, 
Ouattro Pro, and Word- 
Perfect. Pey I* $6.17/ 
hour. Apply at Person 
nel and Information 
Systems, 110 Court- 
house PI a r a, third floor, 
through April IB, 1BS4. 
EEOE. 

STUDENT OFFICE manag- 
er needed at K State lo- 
cation. Approximately 
15 flexible hours per 
week and approximate- 
ly $500/ month. Job be- 
gins now, breaka for 
summer, and resumes 
whan school atarta. 
Businaas background 
NOT required. Great 
job for busy student 
For more information 
see "Jons Note*' card 
on tha Job Board in the 
Union Apply a* aoon 
as possible 

SUMMER EMPLOY- 

MINT. Experienced 
Combine or Truest 
Driven needed for 
custom wheat her- 
vaatlng operation. 
Motel and Meele in- 
eluded. Wages based 
on experience. Work 
from May 20 thru Au- 
gust 15, 1994. From 
Texas to Montana. 
Lancaster Harvesting, 
Oodg* City, Kansas 
Call Now 13161227 8821. 

SUMMER WORK available 
at KSU Vegetable Re 
learch Farm, DeSoto 
(Kansas City a reel. $6/ 
hour/ 40 hour* per 
week. Mult have own 
transportation to the 
farm. Contact Dr. Cha- 
rles Marr. Horticulture, 
Wateri Hall 532-6170 
or Christy Nagel (same) 
for more information. 

SUMMER WORK. $470 per 
week average. Good 
track record needed. 
Call 1-800-840 2840 

THE CITY of Waatmora- 
land I* accepting appli- 
cation to fill tha posi- 
tion of pool manager 
WSI cartlfication re- 



ADVERTISING PRODUCTION 



Publication Practice 
JMC 360 

Get training and gain experience while earning one hour of 
credit this fall. Attend class one day a week from 8:30 a.m.- 
1 1 :30 a.m. The day of the week is your choice based on 
availability. Only two positions left so sign up early. The 
instructor's permission is required. 

The experience you earn in the fall would qualify you to apply 
for a paid position in the spring. 

•* 8 a.m.-3 p.m. ' 
I for more information and syllabus 



<* 



quired for further In- 
formation call 
1 -457-3361 or request 
an application from 

City Halt 202 Main St. 
Westmoreland. 

TRAVEL FROM Taxaa to 
Montana on a prof as 

sional wheal harvesting 
crew. Guaranteed 
monthly wage, bonus, 
room and board. Call 

19131567 4649 

VARNEYS BOOK Store ia 
now taking application* 
for TEMPORARY 

PART-TIME and TEM- 
PORARY FULL-TIME 
positions in Ih* text- 
book department to 
assist with textbook 
buy back Possible em- 
ployment dales are 
April 26 through May 
13 $4 30 par hour. In 
volves helping custom- 
er*, moderate lifting 
and cleaning/ pricing 
books. All positions re- 
quire diligence and a 
pleasant, service -orient 
ad attitude College ex- 
perience is strongly pre 
ferrad Apply In person 
downstair* at Vs may's 
Book Store. 823 N, 
Manhattan Ave., Man 
hartan. KS. Deadline for 
application* is Fri., 

April 15. 

VISTA DRIVE-IN is now hir- 
ing lor full or part-time 
help. Flexible hour* 
available Apply in per- 
son 1911 Tuttla Creek 
Blvd. or 2700 Anderson 
Ave. 

WANTED HARVEST 

HELP. Run three 1994 
Case International com 
bines Thrae 1991 
Chevy Kodiak automat 
Ic twin screw truck*. 
Pay i* $1000- $1200 a 
month room and board 
ia provided. Need CDL 
driver* licence. We will 
help obtain CDL over 
Spring Break. Prefer 
non-*mok*r*. 
non-drinkers and no 
drug users. Gaines Har- 
vesting (913x389-4660. 

WEATHER OBSERVER 

needed for the Weather 
Data Library. Muat b* 
available 7- Sam and 7- 
6pm year- round includ- 
ing some weekends 
and holidaya. IS- 30 
hour*/ weak. Preference 
given to undergradu 
ataa with two year* 
availability. Applica- 
tions in 211 Umberger 
Hall. 

WORK-STUDY STUDENT 
lor F94 semester, 15- 
20 hour*/ week. Regis- 
trar** Office. Contract 
Evelyn Larion at 
532-4264 tor informa- 
tion. 



Business 



4101 



The Collegian cannot 
verify the financial po- 
tential of advertise 
menta In tha Employ- 
manl/Cereer classifica- 
tion. Reader* arc *d 
vised to approach any 
such business oppor- 
tunity with reasonable 
caution. The Collegian 
urge* our readers to 
contact the natter Busi- 
ness Bureau, §01 SE 
Jefferson, Topeka. KS 
66607 1190 
(913)232-0454 

ATTENTION STUDENTS: 

Earn extra cash stuffing 
envelope* at horn*. All 
materials provided. 
Send SASE to Midwest 
Mailers P.O. Box 395, 
Olathe, KS 66051. Im- 
mediate Response. 



400 



OPEN 
MARKET 



Wemtswl to tour 

AUQHI VIDEO GAMES 

Buy- sail- trade. Ninten- 
do- Sega- all systems. 
Game Guy 537-0989 
709 N Twelfth, Ag 
gieville 



Classified Directory 



630 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 



010 /Vitwuncefnerite 
010 LoH and Found 



040 Meefo^vwrts 
000 PwltofrMore 



100 Ft* flint — 
Apt, RaTtajfoXJ 

110 foFatri- 

ADt. UTfJuTrsatttd 



111 Rc«roAvailaDtt 

1» for Hart -House* 

1« FtfS&b-HouMS 

130 For Root - 
MoWe Homes 

100 FofSate- 
MobHe Homes 

140 For Rent— Garage 

140 FkxxwTttaWarterJ 

100 Sotteast 

1M SSaWerTaffluTe 

100 OfKaSpte* 

100 Land for So*J 




SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



Tutor 



110 RoouTivs/Typirig 
110 Desktop F^jtttWIng 
100 SetainoyARersftm 
200 Pregnancy Testing 
000 Lawn Care 
000 CNkJCare 
040 MMtianfs/DJa 
040 P* Services 
000 AiAomotive Repar 
000 0tnerSarvic*8 




EMPLOYMENT 
CAREERS 



010 HfUpWvMd 
000 VDfcrMan Nf»eoed 

too &mimm 

Oppommfa* 



4^ 



OPEN 
MARKET 



400 WinledtoSuy 

410 Mema tor Sale 

410 FumturB to Buy/Sell 

400 GarageA'ard Sates 

400 Auction 

400 Artjquet 

400 Computer* 

440 FoodSpedalB 

440 Muafc Iftfnjmarrti 

400 Pets and Suppkes 

400 Sporting Equipm** 

400 Stereo £ojj*pfnent 

400 Tickets to Buy/Sel 

1 — . 



iOT 



TRANS- 
PORTATION 



010 AutorrnbJfN 
oto tt*dM 

000 McsYjfcycies 
040 CarPooi 



■ 




TRAVEL 
TRIPS 



010 Tour Pacfcagea 
000 AliTJiane TidustJ 
000 TratoTtetoti 
040 BusTduKi 



CATEGORIES 

To heap you find wnat you are 
looking for, the classified ads 
nave been arranged by category 
and sub-category. Ail categories 
are marked by one ol the large 
images, and sub-categories are 
preceded by a number 
designation. 

TIPS FOR 
WRITING A 
CLASSIFIED AD 

Always put what Hem or 
service you are advertising first 
This helps potential buyer* find 
what they are looking lor. 

Don't use abbreviations. Many 
buyers are contused by 
abbreviations. 

Consider including the price. 
This tells buyers It they are 
looking at something In their price 
range 

WE DO NOT USE PHONE 
NUMBERS OH LAST NAMES IN 
PERSONALS. 



1877 HONDA Express mo- 
torbike, $350, three 
spaed men'* bicycle, 
$40; 10- speed wom- 
en'* bicycle, S7S. Call 
539-3738 

DO VOU want to get rid of 
cellulite? Roils ol fat? 
Those dreaded area* 

that never go away no 
matter how much you 
diet or exercise? Sci 
ence now tells us there 
i* something we can do 
about those problem ar- 
eas, and I have the pro- 
duct that will do just 
that- and it come* with 
a 100 percent Guaran- 
teal Call Cheryl 
776-6393 day. 776-7669 
evening 

SAMYANG ZOOM lens 
with Macro 60 300mm 
Used twice, works 

treat. Need monay. 
100 or beat oiler, Lau- 
rie S87-4S98 

410| 

Furniture to 
■uy/atoM 

MUST SELL fasti Moving 
on April 16, 1994 

Chair, $10; rocking 
chair, $10; kitchen table 
with chairs, $20; queen 
waterbad. $175; book- 
case. $50 537-4373. 



Sporting 
Kqulpiwfit 



TENT. TWO-PERSON Cole- 
man mountaineer II. 
$100 or best offer Chris 
776-1814. 



Stereo 
K*iul|Hn*)iit 



NEW PORTABLE CD play- 
er. Magnavox with car 
adapter*. Chris 

776-1814. 



Tickets to 



BROOKS AND Dunn Con 
cart I April IS) tickets 
for sale. Call 537-6965 
leave message. 



5(H) 



TRANS- 
PORTATION 



0101 



Automobiles 



1984 MITSUBISHI Turbo, 
115K miles. $1400. 
two-door, power wind- 
ows, new brakes, tires, 
battery, alternator, air, 
stereo. Call 539-3588/ 
539-8164. 

1986 RENAULT Alliance. 
Red four-door 108K 
mile*. Vary clean, runs, 
could use engine work. 
$500 or best offer, Lau- 
rie 587-0598. 

1989 PONTIAC LaMan* LE 
87K. excellent condi- 
tion, 40mpg, new 
clutch and tires. $2600, 
539-2528, moving must 
sail. 



1992 SPECIALIZED Stump 
jumper. Silver/ gray, oil- 
air front shock, Coda 
bar-ends. Clean, excel 
lanl condition. $685 
539-0935 leave mes 
sage lor Kevin. 



5301 



Motorcyclea 



1982 SUZUKI GS750T, 
runs excellent, new 
rear tire, very good con 
dition $1200 or best off 
er. 776-7850, ask tor 
Chris. 

1986 NINJA 600R, good, 
sound bike, brand new 

tirea, brakes, battery. 
No mechanical proo 
lama. Some cosmetic 
flaws, 1 1800 776-2099 

1988 HONDA Hawk GT; Ex- 
cellent mileage, under 
6,000 miles, bought 
new In 1991 537 3295 

1990 HONDA CBR 600F, 
new tire*, front fork 
seels, will show in Man 
hattan. Call John 
(913)363-3431 




I Q Tueaday, April 12, 1994 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Election penalties given 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

This penalty was also given to 
arts and sciences senator candi- 
date Tim Kukula, who submitted 
his report after the deadline. 

Kukula said he forgot to turn 
in the report Friday but didn't 
think it would cause a problem. 

"1 came in Friday to turn it in 
and got sidetracked, I left and 
went to Topeka," he said. 
"Saturday afternoon when I got 
home, I called Shanta (Bailey, 
Grievance Committee chair) and 
was told to get it in right away 
because they were going to be 
reviewed Sunday night. 

"It was a stupid mistake on my 
part, but on the other hand, it was 
made clear to me that everything 
was OK." 

Bailey said she did not tell him 
there would be no consequences 



for submitting it late. 

"I have never made any deci- 
sions on my own," she said. "I've 
always waited until my committee 
meets. 

"I said, 'Go ahead and turn it 
in,' but not that everything was 
OK. There was still the chance he 
could get disqualified." 

Because he made the effort to 
submit the report, committee 
members said they didn't think he 
should be disqualified. 

"He made a conscious effort to 
get this in," Eric k son said. There 
was a communication problem." 

She made a motion that he be 
given the same penalty as Garret 
and Kazi, except his workers 
can't be from the College of Arts 
and Sciences. 

The motion passed 3-1. 

Other candidates failed to sub- 
mit reports at all, which is cause 



for disqualification, according to 
the campaign regulations. 

The committee tried to contact 
these candidates and notify them 
of the disqualifications so they 
would have a chance to attend the 
Grievance Committee meeting. 
Five candidates attended the 
meeting and stated their reasons 
for not submitting their reports. 

Tonya Foster, Board of 
Student Publications candidate, 
said she forgot to submit her 
report before she left town Friday 
but turned it in Monday morning 
before the committee members 
contacted her that she was dis- 
qualified. 

Michael Langham, human 
ecology senator candidate, said he 
was unable to get off work before 
the deadline and tried to contact 
Bailey but was unable to reach 
her. 



Fine arts fee questioned 



Parking problem still far from solution 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 

Are her said. 

Several possible locations have 
been looked at, including Memorial 
Stadium. Also considered was the 
site at the corner of Mid Campus 
Drive and Claflin Road. 

"Ideally, the structure would be 
positioned in the center of campus, 
which happens to be in between 
Durland and Ackert halls, in Lot A- 
28," Archer said. "The other part to 
that, though, is the center of activi- 
ty." 

In terms of the center of activity, 
a location closer to the Union — the 
entrance to campus and the place 
where most visitors go — might be 
necessary. 



Also, if the parking garage is 
located in Memorial Stadium, it 
would mean traffic wouldn't have 
to drive through campus to get to it, 
Archer said. He added that in that 
case, Anderson Avenue would have 
to be widened to handle the traffic 
flow. 

All these plans are only propos- 
als so far, Anderson said. 

Other options to solving the 
parking problem are also being 
reviewed. 

"We're kind of in a limbo right 
now," Archer said."We need to find 
out what the community wants and 
is willing to support. As soon as we 
know that, we'll begin immediately 
to make moves to make the parking 



garage or the shuttle system hap- 
pen." 

Another dimension has been 
added to the issue with the possibili- 
ty of the city of Manhattan annexing 
the K -Slate campus coming up. 

The various details of a possible 
annexation are still being worked 
out with the city, Skoog said, and it 
is not the right time to press for 
specifics of parking on campus. 

"It is possible with annexation 
we will have a city- wide or a cam- 
pus and city-wide solution," Skoog 
said. "But it's premature to predict 
what form that'll take." 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

of Speech, said he thought his 
department's purchase of the com- 
puter equipment was justified. 

"I think it's a legitimate purchase 
because these are machines that 
make the marketing, advertising and 
the production of the (department's) 
plays more efficient and hopefully 
in the long run saves student 
money." 

Procter said he was confident 
that his department had not violated 
any rules by purchasing the comput- 
ers with student fee money 

Procter's department purchased 
more than $3,000 worth of comput- 
er equipment with money from the 
Fine Arts Council account set up for 
the K-State Players. 

Sarah Caldwell, SGA finance 
chair, said that the rules were in 
need of change. 

"There needed to be some new 
guidelines set because the fine arts 
fee is designed to promote program- 
ming on campus, and departments 
buying stationary or computers is 
not programming," Caldwell said. 

In February, Student Senate 
approved new guidelines that would 
force fine arts groups to receive the 
approval before purchasing items 
declared as capital goods costing 
more than $250. 

The purchase of the computers 



TIM 

LEHMANN 

Union Governing Board 

Paid for by Ldurunn for UGB 



"The College o 

Students Goti 
will be held Tue 

from 8:30 a.m. • 



T 





1 mere will De 
for Arts & SciencgPBJudj - 
on Wednesday; 




Counc 




***•••*••*•••••••*•*••* 



V 




UNIVERSITY 
BANDS 



BE A PART 



OF THE 



"PRIDE" 






~ 



^ 



•FLAGS, DANCE LINE, 
TW1RLERS 

Auditions are on Saturday, April 16.8:00 a.m. 
12:00 in Brandenberry Athletic Complex. 

♦INSTRUMENTALISTS 

No audition required - instruments provided. 
•Call the Band Office - 532-5740 for details! 



J 





-A neighborhood fundri**«ry 



INCLUDES 

TACOS 1 TEQUILA 

•00* Lg. Taco 

(Bool & Chicken— 4-9 p.m.) 

•Si Margaritas 
•$1 Frosted Mugs 

3240 Kimball 

Candtewood Center 

Open 11 a.m. till the Party's Overt 1 1 




FUN GIFTS 

FOR All OCCASIONS 

Handblown Oi Lamp* • J*w«try 
Contemporary Clock* 




GUU3 IMPKSSIONS 

329 Poyntz Av*. S«-4ol0 

M-F IP-* * »at 10-6 




occurred in July and August, when 
some programs under the fine arts 
council still have money left in their 
accounts. If the programs do not 
spend this money, it reverts to the 
council's reserves. 

"When you have money left over 
at the end of the year, it's not a 
department's play money to go and 
buy whatever they want." said 
Tricia Nolfi, coordinator of student 
activities. Nolfi said all the parties 
involved share the blame for the 
misuse of funds. 

"Student Government did not 
come up with clear guidelines when 
they established the fee," Nolfi said. 
"However, I think that the people 
on the Fine Arts Council should be 
a little more responsible and ana- 
lyze what they are spending their 
money on." 

Nolfi said she does not under- 
stand how the speech department's 
computer can be claimed as a pro- 
gramming expense. 

"I fail to see what the K State 
Players need a computer for," Nolfi 
said. "That just doesn't make sense 
to me. They don't justify their own 
computer." 

Nolfi said that SGA recently pur- 
chased computers that were avail- 



1(1 TANS 
FOR H) 



HAROBODICSi 



able for use by student groups. 

Bernard Franklin, assistant dean 
of student life, said the fine arts fee 
was created as a way of offsetting 
the cost of line arts programs so 
more students could attend them. 

He said he didn't think the pur- 
chase of the computers could be 
justified as programming. 

"The intent of the fee was for 
programming in ways that would 
benefit students in attendance and 
participation," Franklin said. 

Derek Krcifels, sophomore in 
business and senator for the college 
of business, said SGA should take 
drastic measures in retaliation for 
the abuse of student fees. 

"I think that SGA should repos- 
sess those computers," Krcifels 
said. 

Caldwell said she did not know 
if the computer purchases could be 
approved by the Fine Arts Council 
under the new guidelines. 

"If they came in with a really 
good case, maybe," she said. "But 
at the same time, it's hard to prove 
that a computer is something that is 
going to benefit the whole campus, 
programm i ng - w i se , 

"It's an awful tough case to 
make," she said. 



GYM 



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* 
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* 
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April 12 ft 13 K-STATE UNION 
"YOUR BUSINESS IS MY BUSINESS" 



* 

* 



We'll keep your foot a tappln* 




The K-State Singers 
SpringShow ^94 

Thursday, April 14 and Saturday, April 16 

McCain Auditorium 8 p.m. 

Tickets available from the McCain Box Office. 532-6428 



JEFF PETERSON for Pres. 

& 
BRAD FINKELDEI>rV:/> 




'Tve known Jeff Peterson for several years. 
No one cares more about Kansas State and 
the people that attend this university than 
Jeff Peterson." 

Quentin T. Neujahr 

PaW for by the committee to eJect Jeff i. Brad 




e Extra 

H? 

At Manhattan 'Biomedical Center you can 

earn $30 per wu^JSlS each time) 

donating ptasma. your donation Witt also 

help improve tfie wett-Scing of others, 

^MANHATTAN 
BIOMEDICAL 
CENTER 

1 130 Gardenway • 776-91 77 
Mon.-Frl 9 >.m.-6:30 p.m.. Sat, 9 a.m.-2 p.i 



Voter's Guide 

to the 







STUDENT 
ELECTION 



Students to pick ID design 



A K-State Collegian Special Section 

••••••••*••••••••••••••••••• 






You have 
many 
choices to 
make, 
Including 
the design 
of your 
K-State ID 



Coitejun 

Voters in this week's election 
will see a referendum that may alter 
the face of K-State. 

Or at least its ID cards. 

JoEllen Fischer, arts and sci- 
ences senator, and Eric Jordan, 
engineering senator, initiated a stu- 
dent referendum to change the 
design of K- State's student IDs. 

The referendum asks voters to 
choose between two new designs 
for the card. One incorporates 
Willie the Wildcat. The other uses 
the newer Po we real logo, the logo 
adopted by football coach Bill 
Snyder for use on the football play- 
ers* helmets. 

Fischer said it was the unaltrac- 
tiveness of the student IDs in use 
that prompted them to initiate the 
referendum. 

"We're sick of what the old IDs 
look like," Fischer said. "When 
looking into the new ones, our main 
concern was what the card looks 
like." 

Jordan said he and Fischer also 
researched changing the ID from 
the laminated card to a plastic one 
similar to those used at Johnson 
County Community College. 

"We researched different types 
of cards," he said. "We found out 
Johnson County Community 
College has plastic cards like credit 
cards. It's got a laser-imaged photo- 
graph of the student on it." 



Fischer said she and Jordan 
hoped the redesigned cards would 
be phased in at no additional cost to 
students, by the fall of 1995. 

It is still too early in the process 
to tell when new cards may be in 
use and how they will be funded, 
Gunile DeVault, associate registrar, 
said. 

The referendum will only be ask- 
ing for opinions on the design of the 
card. The registrar's office will 
decide the final format and what 
materials are used, she said. 

"The main thing JoEllen and I 
wanted was to get student input into 
the cosmetic change of the ID," 
Jordan said. "We came up with 
these two designs with the OK from 
the registrar's office." 



DeVault said she will be pleased 
to get opinions from students on the 
IDs. 

She said Fischer and Jordan initi- 
ated the referendum idea, but the 
registrar's office will be interested 
in finding out the results of the stu- 
dent vote on the matter. 

Fischer said there is no definite 
plan yet for the fate of student ID 
cards. She said the idea of the refer- 
endum is to already have a design 
chosen when the registrar's office is 
ready to replace the current cards. 

Student opinion would heavily 
influence the process at the regis- 
trar's office, DeVault said. 

"The results of the referendum 
will help determine what action we 
will take and when," she said. 



NEW IDs TO BE VOTED ON 

These m mmmntaflimi of the two new Dottlbie student ID desJans SGA 
It sponsoring a non-binding referendum to ost an Idea of student opinion on 
the ID cads at i pal of election*, but the Rep^tOffictaiMhtiatha 

Unn -J fiMJ MM lukaJ Ufa ■ in I iJl lJH ■- -*- ■&.,> 

raw bwy on wren uwcirxn wii wok bm. 



KANSAS 




KANSAS 



TOU* 

WCtum 



ft 



• 

• 

• 

* 

• 

• 

• 

• 
• 
• 
• 
• 

• 
• 

• 



SGA ELECTION LOCATIONS 

Student Governing Association elections will be from 7:30 a.m. to 
6:30 p.m. on April 12 end 13 In the K-Sttrte Union first-floor alcove. 




northJ) 



Vatter Street 



SGA elections for College of Veterinary Medicine students will be 
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. outside the cafeteria in Trotter Hall. 

Denison Avenue 



Greenhouse D • Conservatory 



II 




UmbergerHall 



Pifiman 
Building 



Vet Set. 

Building 



Trotter 
Hall 



• 
• 

• 

• 
• 

• 

• 
• 

• 

• 

• 



T1D KAOAU Jit. / Coatgtan 
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 



TED KAOAU JR. -Collegian 



SGA ELECTION VOTING 




DATE: Apr! 12-13 

HOURS: 730 am. to 9:30 p.m in the Union alcove 

11:00 am. to 1 p.m. outste Iw Vetonfrary MeoVins 
WHO CAN TOTE? All luHme art r^-«ro 
WHAT 00 i NEED? AttudeotK) 

mm BSUES AM I VOTWG ON? The Unton en)WK*nent«ndDi«tt*iduini 
Tht Union requires a 80% majority whfts ID neetea majority. 
WHO AM I VOTING FOR? AJ students vote for tie Union Govemeig &*rd, ihe 
ftwArtsCcuMtestutortraprese^ 

body president and student body vtoe prwJQtfllSejdertseTaton) aw elected by 
t» students in l^wesges.ltoucan vote (was many candUales as them are 
aveiabie seels in each race. 

WHAT W I DIODE TO RUN AT THE LAST WNUTE? AJ write* caitfOtlnmuBt 
hsvt repjstsftd and submiad in expenditure report to the Student Governing 
t mi k**\i1k , tnwi* *>&+#* to *i*$V<p#to. 
WHAT 1 1 HAVE MORE THAN ONE MAM Stutter* in rrmttw animator 
MiOHtovotoinf^oolsptoffieirprirnirymator. 



Union expansion rests on election outcome 



TAWNVA 



The clock is tick- 
ing on the 
Union expan 



sion decision. 



Tuesday and Wednesday, stu- 
dents will vote for or against the 
$9.2 million dollar project. 

The expansion calls for a $25- 
per-semestcr fee for full-time stu- 
dents and a $12. SO per- semester 
fee for part-time students for the 
next 26 years. 

Sixty percent of the students 
voting must vote in favor of the 
fee increase in order for the refer- 
endum to pass. 

The Union Programming 
Council would see the first 



effects of the project. 

Beginning next fall, if the ref- 
erendum passes, the UPC will 
have a budget of $ 1 30,000. 

Its budget is $30,000. It would 
receive $70,000 from the Union 
fee and $30,000 from the adminis- 
tration. 

Extra funding would allow 
UPC to bring in more concerts, 
speakers and events to campus, 
Ann Claussen, UPC director, said. 

Programming is only part of 
the project that would change the 
Union aesthetically and structural 

ly- 

The infrastructure is in much 
need of an overhaul, David Frese, 
student body vice president said. 

The lighting, heating and cool- 
ing systems would be revamped to 
handle the demands that have 



them at their capacity. 

The physical expansion would 
involve a 20,000- square- feet addi- 
tion to the north side of the Union, 
Skyler Harper, associate 
University architect of facilities 
planning, said. 

A three-tiered dining area is 
one of the ideas being discussed to 
fill that addition. Harper said. 

Union planners envision hav- 
ing food court with eating areas 
inside and outside the Union. 

The food service expansion 
might also allow the Union to 
bring in fast food franchises. 

With food services moving 
northward, space would be left to 
the bookstore on the first floor. 

The old lower level of the 
bookstore would be used to create 
space for two to six retail stores. 



Retail space could be estab- 
lished to include private business- 
es such as a travel agency, a 
flower shop, a clothing store or 
music store. 

The purpose of allowing out- 
side enterprises in is to help build 
a retail base, Frese said. 

Also, the copy center may be 
moved to the bookstore, creating 
space for a student activity center 
for the more than 350 K-State stu- 
dent groups. 

Other additions might include 
more study space, more meeting 
rooms and a computer lab. 

The Union is not the only area 
that might sec changes. 

Curbing and landscaping 
would be added to the plaza 
between the Union and Seaton 
Hall. 



STIPHAMe FUQUAJCotoglan 



2 Tuesday, April 12, 1004 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



■■■■■MMBHB 


Failed to 
attend photo 
session for 
picture. 



Adams 




STEFFANY 

Carrel 




STACY 

Dalton 



lumr 
mjnXMmg 




BEN 

Eastep 




JEFF 

Peterson 




What would you do 

TO CONTROL 

THE COST OF TUmON 

AND STUDENT FEES? 

Jared Adams 
failed to turn in a 
questionnaire to the 
Collegian by the 
deadline stated on 
the form. 



Controlling 
student fees is to be 
done here at home, 
and I will. Tuition, 
however, is some- 
thing else entirely. 
Until the folks in 
Topeka make higher 
education a priority, 
students will always 
get the shaft. It is my 
job to be there push- 
ing for the kind of 
fundamental change 
in thinking we need. 



Dale and I are 
convinced that a 
strong lobby team 
used at the state 
level would re-chan- 
nel the emphasis of 
monies from the K- 
1 2 grades and com- 
munity colleges back 
to the state level uni- 
versities. As far as 
student fees are 
concerned, I will not 
be afraid to use my 
veto. 



Well, first of all. 
with the addition of 
the Winston Cup 
Drag Racing strip in 
front of Wefald's 
home, the admis- 
sions, we have cal- 
culated this, will 
bring an annual 
gross income of $4 
million. If a person 
does the math, this 
is the equivalent of 
$200 less a semes- 
ter. This is when 
admission is used 
toward fees. 



What would you do 
to enhance the qual- 
rry of student ufe at 
K-State? 



Off the top of my 
head, I think of the 
Union Enhancement 
Plan I'm supporting. 
If the students vote 
yes for this, next 
year, UPC gets 
$100,000 more to 
play with. Hopefully, 
our Welcome Back 
Concerts can then 
expand from the pre- 
vious Wtnger/Milli 
Vanilti motif. 



We have 
promised the 
students that we will 
not approve any 
student fee increase. 
This would make it 
possible to increase 
student fees In the 
next year only by 
referendum. We will 
have a strong 
lobbying effort in 
Topeka to make a 
difference in the 
tuition we pay. 



We feel that more 
wasteful spending 
could be cut from 
the SQA budget. We 
recommend the cre- 
ation of a committee 
of students outside 
of student govern- 
ment to audit and 
revise the SQA bud- 
get. Furthermore, we 
would act to control 
spending by taking a 
25-percent pay cut. 



One basketball 
game per season in 
Aheaml 



President and Vice president 



Tta 



Th* 



M ni ohiff wvcupvvof IfM Sunn! Govtrafflg 
md pflrttcti if* rtyiti of th» ttudont body iftd Mfvtc ind 
to wiouc SQA tnd UflWfiUji botrot Wo cofMwtttM. 
body *k* pfMtdwrt d «i MtWwl to tt» jxwldwrt ind ***** on eommlttM* tor <M 



What hakes you 

MORE QUALIFIED FOR 
THIS POSmON THAN 
YOUR OPPONENTS? 



I get things done. 
I listen. I'm not hos- 
tile. I'm swell. And I 
have been and want 
to continue to be the 
voice of the stu- 
dents. 



One step would 
be to put a dance 
halt with free beer in 
front of Weber Hall. 
This will allow stu- 
dents to relax after a 
hard day at class 
with a nice cool one. 
Also, we will buy a 
747 for the football 
team, in turn being 
more rested up for 
the road games. 
This will lead to 
more wins. 
Consequently, going 
to the Orange Bowl, 
and that means 
more money for 
every K-Stater . 



The quality of life 
at K-State could be 
enhanced by pro- 
moting the activities 
that are presently 
available. UPC, 
HALO and the 
Manhattan chapter 
of Big Brothers/Big 
Sisters are a tew of 
the many organiza- 
tions that provide 
outstanding opportu- 
nities to students. 
We need to take 
advantage of them. 



Our objective is to 
bring the quality of 
the resources at 
Farreli Library up to 
an acceptable level. 
We would also work 
to bring beer sales 
to the Union. If stu- 
dents are going to 
be paying a substan- 
tially larger Union 
fee, they should be 
allowed to drink in 
Union Station. 



Experience is on 
my side. After serv- 
ing two terms as a 
senator, one as a 
committee chair and 
other campus activi- 
ties. I'm prepared for 
this opportunity. 



Hey, I'm one of 
the only candidates 
who has admitted 
that I'm not going to 
live forever. All the 
others want to live 
for eternity. 



Seeking out stu- 
dent needs for the 
past four years and 
acting on those 
concerns is 
apriority. 
For example, the 
Partnership for 
Excellence, Farreli 
Library and 
handicapped 
accessibility. 



We offer insight 
from both traditional 
and non-traditional 
perspectives. Our 
knowledge of cam- 
pus, state and local 
affairs allows us to 
offer practical solu- 
tions — not rhetoric. 



BEEESEEEEEB 


Failed to 
attend photo 
session for 
picture. 



JANELLE 

Moore 




Kazi 




DALE 

SlLVIUS 



nwutmg tni rrujn*0#m*H 




TAYLOR 

Miller 



What role do you 
think the veep 
should play in stu- 
dent government? 

The vice presi- 
dent is the one per- 
son who is assured 
to have the ear of 
the president. His or 
her job is to convey 
the wishes of the 
student body to the 
president, where it 
will be enacted to 
the best of the 
president's ability. 



What would you oo 

TO ENHANCE THE 

QUALITY Of STUDENT 
UFE AT K-STATE? 

I will fight tooth 
and nail for students' 
wishes, and that 
goes hand in hand 
with open communi- 
cation to find out 
what students want. 
A main platform of 
Jared's and mine is 
keeping fees for stu- 
dents down. 



The vice presi- 
dent should support 
the student body 
president and serve 
as a facilitator of 
communication 
between the execu- 
tive, legislative and 
judicial branches. 
Availability and 
openness are 
important in the role 
of communication as 
well as working 
within the system of 
student government 
and the University. 



Stacy and I pro- 
pose that the vice- 
presidential relation- 
ship should be that 
of a partner with the 
president, not as a 
second-in-com- 
mand. I will be able 
to step in and do 
anything that Stacy 
can do as president. 



What hakes you 

h0re qualified for 
this position than 
your opponents? 

My youth sends a 
message that every 
single student can 
make a difference. 
My KSU speech 
team experience 
makes me a com- 
municator. 



Enhancing 
student life at 
K-State is precisely 
what student 
government should 
be concerned with. I 
believe strongly in 
enhancing student 
experience through 
ensuring the exis- 
tence of student 
friendly academic 
policies. I support 
Union expansion 
and city annexation 
because these 
issues will have a 
crucial hand in 
improving student 
life. 

Keeping fees 
down while providing 
as many services as 
possible to all stu- 
dents. Quit letting 
the administration try 
to control students' 
lives and better them 
instead. 



The role of vice 
president is to sup- 
port the president in 
alt of his endeavors, 
and in the event of 
an assassination of 
the president of the 
student body, step in 
and take control dur- 
ing troubled times. 



I have the ability 
to reach people and 
understand their 
positions. I know 
exactly how to repre- 
sent and voice 
students' diverse 
points of view. 



I've been a leader 
on this campus for 
four years, and I've 
gained much experi- 
ence. My past efforts 
prove that I'm as 
qualified as anyone. 



I propose to drop 
the present ABCDF 
grading system and 
adopt more of an 
"outcomes"- based 
system where if a 
student (eels he or 
she deserves an "A" 
— hey, he or she 
gets an "A." This 
would necessarily 
raise student morale 
because who 
amongst us 
deserves bad 
grades — not you. 



I know that those 
who try to live forev- 
er never do, and I 
will show the stu- 
dents at K-State how 
not "to live forever ." 





1 believe the vice 


1 would keep the 


I believe that I 


JBHflMHESf; 


president should 


cost of attending 


represent the aver- 


■zzzyflJ^Bs 


take a very active 


K-State down by 


age K-state student 


^T^% 


role in student gov- 


fulfilling our 


I have listened to 


1*1 


ernment. The vice 


campaign promise of 


students as a tutor 


I M 


president should be 


not approving any 


and will continue 


£ | 


the vital link between 


student fee 


listening if elected. 




the student and the 


increases. 1 will also 




rv ] 


president. The pri- 


promote fiscal 






mary role should be 


responsibility by 




BRAD 

Finkeldei 


as an ambassador 


taking a 10-percent 




to other colleges and 


salary decrease. If 




student groups, 


this lead is followed 




pjfitCK 


keeping the presi- 


by large student 




chMTwcj*! snfpfwtog 


dent Informed of the 


groups, increased 






students' concerns. 


services will be pro- 
vided from this 
money. 


■ 




1 Patrick Robben 
failed to turn in a 










Failed to 


questionnaire to the 






attend photo 


Collegian by the 






session for 


deadline stated on 






picture. 


the form. 






MTRICK 








Robben 









I 



•f 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, April 12, 1994 



IftheUmon 




ENHANCEMENT PROJECT 




IS APPROVED BY THE 




STUDENTS, WHAT 




WOULD VOU DO TO 




MCLUDE STUDENTS IN 


What makes vou 


THE PLANNING AND 


MORE QUALIFIED FOR 


EXECUTION OF THE 


THIS POSITION THAN 


PROJECT? 


YOUR OPPONENTS? 


■■■■■■■Mi One of the 


I am the new 


i|SMMMjMj| biggest areas of 


Issues and Ideas 


^^B^^^H concern that we 


chair within Union 


MM/ ME should involve the 


Program Council. In 



PATRICK 

Carney 



junior 



PlGGEE 



rf*sJvTitri 
icCOunbng 



Union Governing Board 2 year 

UOBdMfcwhUK-SW* Union budgrt,pon^tndictlvnlM.TMiNt»wlllbr*cM. 




students in is which 
companies are 
allowed to become 
merchants within the 
Union. Through sur- 
veys, visitations and 
polls, the students 
should have a direct 
say in which food 
establishments or 
retail stores are 
allowed to come into 
the K-State Union. 

I would attend dif- 
ferent student orga- 
nizational meetings 
and receive stu- 
dents' input. I would 
have sample survey 
students and have 
meetings in the 
dorms. These meth- 
ods could include 
every ethnic group's 
input and, thus, 
receive a wide vari- 
ety of answers so an 
ultimatum could be 
attempted for all. 



that role, I have to 
be well-acquainted 
with the needs of the 
students. 




If the Union 
enhancement project 
is approved by the 
students, what 
would you do to 
include students w 
the punning and 
execution of the 

PROJECT? 

I would put plan- 
ning meeting dates 
and times in the 
Collegian. I would 
encourage any 
interested student to 
be involved so they 
have a say in what 
their money goes to. 



What makes you 
more qualified for 
this position than 
your opponents? 

I was a Senate 
intern, human ecol- 
ogy senator, mem- 
ber of Academic 
Affairs Committee 
and have served as 
a Senate liaison to 
Union Governing 
Board 




» the Union 

enhancement project 
is approved by the 
students, what 
would you do to 
include students in 
the planning and 
execution of the 

PROJECT? 

I will keep com- 
munication lines 
open between the 
student body and 
the Union 
Governing Board 
Good communica- 
tion is the key to a 
good Union! 



What makes you 
more qualified for 

this position than 
your opponents? 

I feel that I am 
qualified for this 
position because I 
hold the firm belief 
that the student 
Union is just that — 
the students' union! 



MEREDITH 

Mein 



JAMEIA 

Oswald 



tCptftt dcfttgn *nd 



I feel I have good 
leadership skills. I 
would bring diversity 
to this board. I would 
represent minority 
groups, which I feel 
many (organiza- 
tions) don't. 




RICK 

Seger 



If the Union 
Enhancement 
Project is approved, 
communication 
between the 
students, the 
management and 
the designers will 
be imperative. 
Events such as 
open forums involv- 
ing the architects 
and engineers 
would expose the 
students to all 
aspects of the 
expansion, ranging 
from repairing 
deteriorating areas 
to building new 
features. 



f have creativity 
to find short-term 
answers and the 
patience to main- 
tain enthusiasm 
about long term 

goals. 

I 




CLAYTON 

Wheeler 



M*» 



The main push 
behind the union 
enhancement pro- 
ject was making it 
better for the stu- 
dents. Obviously, 
the students have to 
voice their con- 
cerns. Any deci- 
sions made without 
student support 
won't be a benefit. 
Constant input 
forums and attention 
to the wishes of the 
students are my 
concerns. 



I have the desire, 
motivation and dedi- 
cation to work on 
the problems of the 
Union and make it 
work for 
the students. 



SNEHAL 

Bhakta 

tumor 
•duCJJborVtnginttnng 



Union Governing Board 1 year 




If the Union 
enhancement project 
is approved by the 
students, what 
would you do to 
include students in 
the planning and 
execution of the 

PROJECT? 

I would try to 
have forums for the 
students so they will 
be informed about 
what is going on and 
have some voice 
with decisions that 
enhance the Union 
for the 
students. 



What makes you 
more qualified for 
this position than 
your opponents? 

I represent a 
broader range of 
students. For exam- 
ple, as an engineer, 
I represent those 
views, and as an 
educator, I represent 
those views. 



USB dMtt with K-State Union budgtli. pollciM ind kUvUm. Four Mat* MM bt 



If the Union 

enhancement project 
is approved by the 
students, what 
would you do to 
include students m 
the planning and 
execution of the 

PROJECT? 




TIMOTHY 

Lehmann 




Richardson 



{utw 



Solicit opinions by 
striking up conversa- 
tions in the Union. 
Make details and 
upcoming decisions 
common knowledge. 
Also, I would work 
toward making office 
hours mandatory for 
UGB members, and 
I would serve them 
even if they weren't 
required. Also, I 
would speak to and 
survey living groups 
and campus 
organizations. 



I've gained orga- 
nizational and lead- 
ership experience 
through Education 
Ambassadors. I'm 
also an active volun- 
teer. I would put my 
skills and dedication 
to work for UGB. 




TOM 

TURRELL 



I would like to 
gather information 
on the students' 
expectations and 
ideas regarding 
Union enhancement 
through a question- 
naire available at 
fee payment. I 
would also like to 
continue the student 
forums to ensure 
that the students 
have continual input 
and are well 
informed of Union 
enhancement plans. 

The students 
should be able to 
play a vital role in 
the development of 
the Union. One 
way is to allow the 
architecture depart- 
ment to produce 
several plans for 
the project, display 
them and allow the 
students to have 
the final decision 
on which plan 
should be used. 



What makes you 
more qualified for 
this position than 
your opponents? 

My student build- 
ing manager posi- 
tion at the Union 
allows me the 
unique perspective 
of the Union's 
needs as well as 
those of the stu- 
dents. 




HEIDI 

NlEHUES 



If the Union 

ENHANCEMENT PROJECT 
IS APPROVED BY THE 
STUDENTS, WHAT 
WOULD YOU DO TO 
MCLUDE STUDENTS IN 
THE PLANNING AND 
EXECUTION OF THE 
PROJECT? 

Next to the UGB 
bulletin board in the 
K-State Union, I will 
post a "question of 
the week" on the 
Union enhance- 
ment to gather input 
on student ideas. 
Students can leave 
their great ideas in 
the suggestion box 
next to the UGB 
board. 



What makes you 
more qualified for 
this position than 
your opponents? 

Mere at K-State, I 
have participated in 
Student Senate, 
human ecology 
council, human 
ecology honors pro- 
gram, and student 
affairs and social 
services committee. 



tppirti dnign 



I feel I have a 
realistic and open 
mind in every situ- 
ation. Nothing 
would pass 
through my hands 
without careful and 
thorough consider- 
ation. 




LEO 



Walsh 



(UIH« 



I would like to 
make sure the 
enhancement plan- 
ning meetings are 
open and adver- 
tised to students 
and also start inter- 
est groups such as 
soap-opera watch- 
ers and studiers for 
planning specific 
areas of the new 
Union. I would also 
use the "survey 
board" that was on 
the Union's first 
floor. 



As a Union build- 
ing manager, I know 
and deal with most 
of the policies that 
UGB has made. I 
know the Union top 
to bottom. 



Tuesday, April 12, 1 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




MAUREEN 

Ashe 



IflBjMNM 




Ensz 

graduate student 
IhHttr 



Failed to 
attend photo 
session for 
picture. 



GREG 

Roth 



agricultural eeonomiCVNRES 



What would vou do 
to get students more 
involved in the fine 
Arts Council and 
the AcnvrresiT 

SPONSORS? 

I would start by 
giving the Fine Arts 
Council a lot more 
publicity. Students 
won't get involved in 
something they have 
never heard of or 
hear about. The stu- 
dents need to be 
told what is happen- 
ing and what is 
being done If there 
is to be more 
involvement. 



If elected to Fine 
Arts Council, I will 
promote quality pro- 
gramming, diversity 
and multiculturalism 
within the system of 
the arts. In addition, 
by attending meet- 
ings of the council 
and of Student 
Senate, I will pro- 
mote greater com- 
munication among 
the different depart- 
ments of the arts at 
KSU. 



I would work to 
increase student 
awareness of Fine 
Arts Council activi- 
ties through 
increased publicity. 
Surveys and polls 
should be used to 
gauge what students 
are interested in, 
and then the council 
needs to find and 
promote activities 
that appeal to those 
interests. 



What hakes vou 
more qualified for 

THIS POSmON THAN 
VOUR OPPONENTS? 

I have been very 
active in the fine arts 
my whole life , and I 
feel that my past 
experiences will be 
beneficial to the 
council. 



Brooks 



1 Fine Arts Council 

Tha Rna AiH Council k retponattea tor eioeaBng t 
from M In BH tot Including tpaetn architecture, an, . 
McCain Auditorium. Ebony Theefea Co., and the Office ot 
NuUfcuttunl Artalrt. Thli It th« flrtl year ttudem* wW be 
McM to me council. Than an Ova* aaata 



What would you DO 
to get students more 
involved in the flne 
Arts Council and 
the activities ft 
sponsors? 

The best way to 
get students 
involved is to get 
them informed. I 
would hope to 
post a schedule of 
activities spon- 
sored by the Fine 
Arts Council. I 
would al*3 like to 
consider any sug- 
gestions made by 

the general student 

body. 




What hakes vou 
more qualified for 

THIS POSmON THAN 
YOUR OPPONENTS? 

As a senior in 
music education, the 
amount of time I 
have spent in the 
performing arts 
gives me a clear 
understanding of this 
position. 




JIM 

Counts 



What would vou do 
to get students more 
involved in the flne 
Arts Council and 

THE ACTIVTTIES rT 
SPONSORS? 

Coming from the 
college of architec- 
ture and design, the 
age-old answer of 
"communication" 
always surfaces. 
Spending a majority 
of time in Seaton 
Hall helps when 
you need student 
input and opinions. 



What hakes you 
more qualified for 

THIS POSmON THAN 
VOUR OPPONENTS? 

Knowledge of 
SQA from senate 
experience, mem- 
bership on college 
council, work ethic, 
and I know Dwayne 
Oylert 



tufKO< 



I WJ ClMIQn 



As a graduate 
student with my 
bachelor's in theater 
at KSU, t have the 
experience and the 
knowledge to sue* 
cessfully serve the 
student body. 




ELIZABETH 



pra-Maalrh prDteuwtt program 



Not being a fine 
arts major, I can 
bring in new per- 
spectives and ideas 
that will help all stu- 
dents benefit from 
the Fine Arts fee. 



I would bring 
more interesting 
fine-arts events to 
campus, and then 
would publicize the 
events more to 
encourage student 
involvement and 
interest. The leg- 
islative authority 
needs to be spread 
among the mem - 
HOCHBERG bers so that people 
will want to partici- 
pate because they 
feel they have an 
actual part. 



I would increase 
advertising. 
Students are not 
always aware of the 
many events that 
take place free of 
charge. If more peo- 
ple knew about the 
many opportunities 
to see incredible 
HEATHER performances at no 

SCHOENBERGER cost - involvement 
could increase. 



I am a member of 
the McCain Student 
Development Board, 
and the student rep- 
resentative to the 
Board of Directors 
of the Friends of 
McCain. 




MOLLIE 

Massieon 



junior 

mu*tc #duc*bon 




Because I am a 

member of the fine 
arts department, I 
see first hand how it 
suffers. I am dedi- 
cated to restoring 
proper funding for 
the arts at K-State. 




CARISSA 

Wall 



A key to student 
involvement is 
University media. 
Because there has 
been a lack of cov- 
erage, this would be 
the first step in mak- 
ing the students feel 
more involved, I'd 
like to emphasize 
the fact that the arts 
are an important 
element of our lives 
that can't be 
ignored. 



I would like K- 
State students to be 
able to buy a Fine 
Arts Pass at the 
beginning of the 
year which would 
enable students to 
attend concerts and 
drama productions 
without paying each 
time. This would 
save the students 
money and boost 
attendance. 



I've been 
involved in KSU 
choral and instru- 
mental programs for 
three years, giving 
myself an aware- 
ness for strong stu- 
dent representation 
in the fine arts. 



Having been 
involved in the arts 
most of my life, and 
being in K-State 
choir and drama, 
makes me aware of 
the important issue 
of funding. 



Editor's tote: Laurie Holle wll be listed oh the tAuorr, but fajled to complete the Collegian questionnaire by the deadline listed on the form. 





l 

One of the duties of 






the Board of 






Student Publications 






IS TO SELECT EDITORS 






AND MANAGERS FOR 






THE ADVERTISING 






DEPARTMENT, 






Collegian and Royal 






Purple. What 






CRITERIA WOULD YOU 


What makes you 




USE FOR SELECTING 


MORE QUALIFIED FOR 




STUDENTS FOR THESE 


THIS POSmON THAN 






POSITIONS? 

1 1 feel that if the 
individuals meet the 


YOUR OPPONENTS? 






1 feel that this 






position does not 






requirements that 


need me to be more 






have been set by 


qualified than my 






the board, then that 


opponents. 1 pos- 






is what 1 would use 


sess the skills to 






to select these 


carry out the job effi- 






individuals. 1 also 


ciently. 






feel that these 








individuals must be 




JERMINE 


able to be sensitive 




Alberty 


in selecting their 
staff. 1 feel that their 




ffMhrnm 


staffs should 




tduc*Wn 


represent all 
ethnicities. 






1 believe the 


i 
1 would 


HH 


Collegian and Royal 


encourage everyone 




Purple need leaders 


to get out and vote 


«B» U «w 1 


to provide tor a 


because the Board 


'?TbE_£ M 


good learning envi- 


of Student 


m ^aS 


ronment and at the 


Publications selects 


■a* 1 


same time continue 


the leaders of the 


mV •! 


to put out the quality 


student publications 


■ A 


product they are 


and sets the direc- 


LaMtafl 


known for. 1 think 


tion for them. 


AARON 


my experience at 




Otto 


the Collegian will 
help me when 




prflriftnvgrt 
^umiUtm^jotiric*! «**nc* 


selecting the people 
necessary to fill 








these positions. 





Board of Student Publications ' 

Ttw Board of Student Publication* it the board of director* for Student Publication* Inc., which over- 
tee* *• Royal Purple yearbook, the CoHaglan newspaper and tha Ctmou* directory. Tha board meet* 
onca a month and member* dutia* Include tupervlalng tha budget* of the pubtkaUona, hiring editor* and 
advartlaing manager* and writing general policla*. Tha board hat no authority pertaining to the coolant of 
any of tha ttudent publication*. Four taatt art available. 



One of the duties of 
the Board of 
Student Publications 
is to select editors 
and managers for 
the advertising 
department, 
Collegian and Royal 
Purple. What 
criteria would vou 
USE for selecting 
students for these 
positions? 

Candidates for 
advertising manag- 
er, and Collegian 
and Royal Purple 
editors should start 
from the ground 
level and work up. 
This means a candi- 
date for the 
Collegian, for exam- 
ple, should be a 
staff writer for at 
least one semester 
and then work as a 
desk editor and 
work up through the 
bureaucracy. 



Eorron's note: Richard Cherra will be usteo on me ballot, but MUD to complete 
the Collegian questionnaire by the deadline usteo on the fork. 




What makes you 
more qualified for 
this position than 
vour opponents? 

I have been part 
of the Collegian staff 
for four semesters. I 
also have experi- 
ence from other 
publications — both 
college and profes- 
sional in writing and 
management. 




TONYA 

Foster 



TAMARA 

fORDON 



Tor 

tUI*K 

bmttktm 



toumaMem 



One of the duties of 
the Board of 
Student Publications 
is to select editors 
and managers for 
the advertising 
department, 
Collegian and Royal 
Purple. What 
criteria would vou 
use for selecting 
students for these 
positions? 

My criteria would 
consist of selecting 
students who are 
conscious of their 
responsibilities and 
qualified to meet all 
requirements asked 
of the particular 
position they are 
seeking. Additional 
criteria, for posi- 
tions that apply, 
would be selecting 
students who are 
looking to benefit 
the diverse student 
body as a whole, 
not a select few. 



What hakes vou 

more qualified for 
this position than 
your opponents? 

I will bring diver- 
sity to the Board of 
Student 

Publications which 
is greatly needed. 
Ultimately, I will 
help bring fairness 
to this position. 



■ +*m » » *■ am | > i i m . 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tu*«<f«y, April 12, 1094 




What would you do 
to control 

THE COST OF TlimON 
AMD STUDENT FEES? 

A steady increase 
is a part of life, 
especially If we are 
going to keep up the 
standards of this 
University. What I 
can try to do is keep 
the irrelevant costs 
down to a bare 
minimum. 



SHANNON 

AlFORD 



■grtcuftinl •corwmics 




Edelman 




( will help better 
plan the allocation of 
student money and 
prevent overspend- 
ing, which occurred 
this past year. With 
the better manage- 
ment of the student 
money, there 
shouldn't be a raise 
in student fees. It's 
all in how wisely the 
senators allocate the 
money. I will also 
strive to inform the 
students exactly 
where their money is 
going. 

I would look at 
each proposal sepa- 
rately to determine 
what value it would 
have to students 
and to determine 
whether it would be 
worth a fee increase. 



JACOB 

Larison 



■gncuHufll KonomES 




Prioritize! 



DALE 

Pracht 

•ophomofi 

kQrtcuRur* tducaboft 



To control the 
cost of tuition and 
fees. Student 
Senate needs to re- 
evaluate how funds 
are presently spent. 
I believe many bud- 
gets, such as the 
Lafene Hearth 
Center budget, cur- 
rently get more stu- 
dent money than 

Schlatter they need 



I feel student fees 
must be spent wisely 
and, therefore, I will 
oppose frivolous 
spending bills. I will 
also lobby for 
greater support for 
higher education 
from the Legislature. 




MARVIN 



tQnaiHwl trutmMa 




JOEL 

Snyder 




SGA needs to 
lobby for a "cap" on 
the cost/fee ratio. 
This "cap" would 
allow tuition and fees 
to increase only when 
state monies were 
available to propor- 
tionally malch the 
amount that come 
directly from the stu- 
dent's pocket. 



WlEDEMAN 



What would vou do 

TO ENHANCE THE 

QUALITY OF STUDENT 
UFE AT K-STATE? 

K-State bestows 
many opportunities 
and activities. The 
improvement of stu- 
dent life lies with the 
awareness of these 
enhancing pro- 
grams. 



I believe it is very 
important that the 
student leaders 
remember who they 
are representing and 
keep the students in 
their best interest. I 
want to eliminate the 
communication gap 
between the Student 
Senate and the stu- 
dent body. By doing 
this, the students will 
be able to give a 
more informed vote 
on major issues. 



I would like to see 
the price of student 
athetotic season 
passes reduced or 
nullified. 



Extravagant build- 
ings, multi-level 
parking and luscious 
green grass will 
enhance student life 
at K-State — not! 
Improved communi- 
cation between stu- 
dents, Senate and 
faculty will lead to 
enhanced educa- 
tion, improved stu- 
dent activities and 
reasonable student 
fees. All of these will 
enhance student life 
at K-State. 

I believe projects 
such as the library 
renovation and the 
Rec expansion will 
greatly enhance stu- 
dent life in the 
future. To enhance 
the quality of student 
life in the near 
future, I fully support 
the expansion of the 
Union Program 
Council budget. 



The parking prob- 
lem on campus has 
received lip service 
for far too long. If 
elected, I will 
demand action on 
this issue and 
accountability from 
Parking Services. 



■flfcntf ia*fic« and irVhuwy 



SGA's purpose is 
to serve the students 
and act as a vehicle 
by which student con- 
cerns reach 
administration. 
I would execute these 
duties professionally, 
and when allocating 
money to organiza- 
tions, unlike the past, 
will consider short- 
term and long-term 
financial needs, com- 
pelled by strategic 
planning and fiscal 
conservatism. 



College of Agriculture 



StltMtlOT 



for nt CoNipji of nfljricwuflE> 



What hakes you 
more qualified fob 
tw8 position than 
your opponents? 

Initiative and 
tenacity are my 
strong points. 
People find me 
approachable and 
willing to listen. My 
networking incorpo- 
rates a younger stu- 
dent — the founda- 
tion of this 
University. 



By serving on the 
Senate body this 
year, I have had the 
challenge of dealing 
with several positive 
and negative issues. 
Service to students 
in agriculture is my 
top priority. 



I have never been 
in Student Senate. I 
offer a new perspec- 
tive that will benefit 
every student 
enrolled in agricul- 
tural majors. Call me 
at 587-0118. 



Dedication, 
creativity, flexibility 
and strong work 
ethic distinguish me 
from fellow candi- 
dates. By combining 
qualities, every pro- 
ject tackled has suc- 
cessfully been com- 
pleted while elimi- 
nating 
conflicts. 



I will bring an 
open-minded, unbi- 
ased approach to 
student government, 
and I am willing to 
work for the stu- 
dents' needs. 



My strong leader- 
ship background 
and work ethic make 
me your choice for 
Agriculture Student 
Senator. I am com- 
mitted to making K- 
State better for you. 



I have extensive 
experience on Ag 
Council, understand- 
ing of Student 
Senate, a "real stu- 
dent" approach and 
the common sense to 
best represent the 
College of 
Agriculture 




MICHELLE 

ECKLUND 




PAUL 

Friedrichs 




TRENT 

LeDoux 



limn* 
fnm*jQf9fm)irH 



■Hb^b^b^bM 


Failed to 
attend photo 
session for 
picture. 



Roth 



wg KmomaMRES 




JAY 

Schneider 



agrtcuMunl joumiiwn art 




DOUO 

Walsh 



(uni« 



What would you do 

TO CONTROL 
TWCOSTOFTUtTtON 
AND STUDENT FEES? 

I would vote 
against any increas- 
es in tuition and stu- 
dent fees. Also, I 
would tell all admin- 
istrators and legisla- 
tors in Topeka my 
reasons for being 
against these 
increases. 



The most impor- 
tant step in control- 
ling costs is inform- 
ing fellow students 
and listening to their 
suggestions and 
input. I will strive to 
be fair when evaluat- 
ing student pro- 
grams, to listen to 
new options and 
opinions and always 
keep in mind what is 
best for the students 
and the University, 



Fees should not 
be raised! We can 
function within our 
means 1 If that 
means that we have 
to cut inefficient pro- 
grams, then 
Hallelujah) Tuition 
must be curtailed. If 
you care, then make 
your voice heard. 



I would control 
costs through priori- 
tizing and efficient 
spending. By evalu- 
ating what is impor- 
tant to students and 
spending intelligent- 
ly, we can maximize 
the benefits from 
each dollar that 
Senate allocates. 



This year in 
Senate, a Privilege 
Fee Committee was 
created to handle 
student fees. I would 
like to serve on this 
committee to help 
keep a close watch 
on the students' 
money. 



With the 
possibility of another 
$25 being added to 
our fees for the 
Union expansion, it 
is of great necessity 
that we control hikes 
in fees and tuition to 
things students 
want. I would sup- 
port any measure of 
doing this. It all 
comes back to com- 
munication between 
senators and 
students. 



What would you do 
to enhance the 
quauty of student 
life at k-state ? 

I am working on 
the parking council, 
where we are look- 
ing at the current 
distribution of park- 
ing spaces on cam- 
pus. I would like to 
make the number of 
permits sold and the 
available spaces 
more equal. Two 
committees to hear 
complaints about 
academics and 
advising and res!- 
halls would 
be valuable. 



Ample opportuni- 
ties for students to 
improve their quality 
of life exist at KSU. 
I will try to enhance 
student life by 
informing and 
encouraging te- 
stators to take 
advantage of these 
opportunities, 
whether it be learn- 
ing more about inter- 
national study 
options, getting free 
tutoring or finding 
out how to get 
summer internship 
placement, etc. 

Students will 
prosper when they 
can spend their own 
moneyl Student fees 
need to be more 
closely scrutinized. 
We need to do a 
much better job 
spending the stu- 
dents' money. 



I would work to 
increase awareness 
tor the activities and 
services available to 
students on campus. 
Many opportunities 
for extra-curricular 
education are 
missed because stu- 
dents do not know 
about them. By get- 
ting students 
involved, they can 
learn more, meet 
new people and 
enhance their col- 
lege experience. 

I would like to see 
a greater variety of 
courses in each stu- 
dent's curriculum 
and core classes to 
give the student a 
broader area of 
study — but still be 
In the interest of his 
or her chosen field. 



Student life is of 
top concern to 
everybody involved 
with K-State, and 
with building expan- 
sions and changes 
taking place all 
around us, K-State 
is rapidly becoming 
the college of the 
'90s. To continue the 
enhancement of stu- 
dent life, communi- 
cation and coopera- 
tion must be our top 
priority. 



Etxroa'i mote: Damn Toun wu. H utfto on m 
the Coluhmn* ouamoNwuni wt the oiaoum on the 



tAUOT, BUT FMJD TO COMPUTE 



What makes you 
more quaufko for 

THIS POSmON THAN 
YOUR OPPONENTS? 

I served one year 

as an intern for 
Student Senate and 
a member of the stu- 
dent affairs commit- 
tee and a member of 
the parking council. 



Open-mlnded- 
ness, an ability to lis- 
ten and a strong 
desire to learn are 
qualities that will 
enable me to effec- 
tively serve as a stu- 
dent senator. 



I have done a 
good job this year 
fighting higher fees 
and Irresponsible 
spending. If you 
don't want Senate 
throwing money 
away, vote tor 
LeDoux. 



Working in a vari- 
ety of college and 
university activities, I 
have listened to stu- 
dent ideas and will 
work hard to imple- 
ment them. 



Through one year 
of service as a stu- 
dent senate intern, I 
have a very good 
understanding of 
senate and all Us 
processes. 



I believe It comes 
down to experience 
and the will and abil- 
ity to communicate 
with the student 
body- 1 have these 
qualifications. I'll use 
them. 



6 



Tueeday, April IS, 1994 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



■M»NMIHIMIMI»IH 




LAURA 

Bathurst 




CUNTON 

Brauer 



What would you do 

TO CONTROL 

THE COST Of TUmON 

And stuoemt fees? 

I believe that 
Student Senate 
should work to keep 
students from being 
"priced out of an 
education.'' Without 
cutting programs 
that provide needed 
services for stu- 
dents, I will work to 
keep fees and tuition 
low by eliminating 
waste within the 
system. 



First, we need to 
critically appraise 
the budget and 
question the pur- 
pose of each alloca- 
tion. Second, if we 
want to raise money 
for something, for 
example, Union 
expansion, then we 
should cut back on 
something else to 
make room for that 
fee and keep stu- 
dent costs down. 




JULIE 

Gates 



We must keep K- 
Staters from being 
forced out of an edu- 
cation. This can be 
done with a strong 
student lobbying 
effort in the state 
capital. Each fee 
must be evaluated 
to determine its 
necessity, and how 
its money is being 

COVERDALE *•»* *■•■ ™>m 

therefore be 
increased only when 
necessary. 




Failed to 
attend photo 
session for 
picture 



Dechant 



Gumbo pvfy 



The best way to 
control the cost of 
tuition and student 
fees would be to 
look beyond conven- 
tional means and be 
creative. Off-track 
betting or a KSU lot- 
tery would be cre- 
ative ways of con- 
trolling costs. 
Additionally, privati- 
zation of the Union 
should be an option 
to be explored. 




I would vote 
against unnecessary 
programs and pay 
raises. However, I 
would not vote to 
eliminate programs 
which improve the 
quality of education 
at K-State. 



Engler 



What would you do 
to enhance the 

QUALITY OF STUOENT 
UFE AT K-STATE? 

By acting as the 
voice of the stu- 
dents, KSU Student 
Senate performs a 
watch-dog function 
for the students. I 
believe that commu- 
nication between 
Student Senate and 
students about deci- 
sions before they 
are made is the first 
step to finding out 
student concerns 
and improving the 
quality of life. 



I would make 
sure the UPC part of 
the Union expansion 
bill went into effect. I 
believe this influx of 
funding liberates 
UPC to do things 
such as hiring out- 
door concerts and 
top-flight comedians. 
I have connections 
to groups such as 
the Gin Blossoms, 
and comedians like 
Adam Sandler. 



Education is the 
key. If a fee increase 
was proposed, I 
would gather as 
much information as 
possible about the 
proposal. Then I 
would find out the 
students' feelings. I 
want to do what is 
best for the stu- 
dents. I would also 
like to see a cap 
placed on tuition. 



As senator, I 
would support legis- 
lation calling for 
enhancement of stu- 
dent services. I 
would also try to be 
educated on all eco- 
nomic expenditures 
in an effort to make 
Senate more fiscally 
responsible. Funds 
should be going to 
projects to benefit 
the student body as 
a whole. 



Student groups 
should receive most 
of the student activi- 
ty fee so that these 
groups have enough 
funding to survive. 
This provides stu- 
dents various differ- 
ent groups to partici- 
pate in. Also, these 
groups should be 
encouraged to 
spend this money on 
programs and activi- 
ties on campus that 
are open to all stu- 
dents. 



First, aim at 
decreasing costs to 
give the student 
more money to work 
with. Also, expand 
the services the 
campus offers. 
Another way of 
enhancing the quali- 
ty of student life 
would be to set up a 
mechanism for the 
student body to give 
direct input into 
changes (I.e. a 
"campus Improve- 
ment" column in the 
Collegian, or open 
discussions in trie 
Union). 



There are many 
things which I would 
like to do to 
enhance the quality 
of student life at re- 
state. I would work 
to improve the park- 
ing problems and to 
enhance the Union. 
I believe in funding 
programs which 
bring new artistic 
and cultural per- 
spectives to K-State. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



UiMttar* 



What makes you 
more qualified for 
this position than 
your opponents? 

My involvement 
with diverse campus 
groups exposes me 
to a variety of view- 
points. Student 
Senate intern, 
Putnam Hall, and 
Alpha Delta PI are 
just three. 



Senate will be my 
foremost activity, not 
a place to visit on 
Thursday night. I 
have the time and 
willpower to do 
things right. 



I have been 
actively involved in 
student government 
since eighth grade, 
and I am presently 
serving aa an intern 
on Student Senate. 



After serving on 
Student Senate for 
the past year, I have 
gained an under- 
standing of what stu- 
dents want and how 
to make these wish- 
es happen. 



We are involved 
in groups on cam- 
pus and are effec- 
tive in pleasing our 
constituency. We 
will play an assertive 
role in order to reach 
a cooperative agree- 
ment. 



I can bring a fresh 
perspective Into 
Senate, which dif- 
fers from the tradi- 
tional Student 
Government view. 
It's my goal to 
improve educational 
opportunities for 
everyone. 



' 



JARED 

Becker 




PATRICK 

Carney 




BRANDON 

Clark 




Dean 



Gwntwpvly 




JOHN 

Daugharthy 



What would you do 
to control 

THE COST OF TUmON 
AND STUDENT FEES? 

There Is a need 
for a more responsi- 
ble attitude in the 
matters of spending. 
I would try to push 
the body of Student 
Senate toward a 
more focused and 
responsible attitude 
about our fee 
money. I'd like to 
spend better, not 
more. 



I am a current 
member of the 
Student Senate 
Legislative Affairs 
Committee. As a 
senator, I would use 
my experience with 
the Legislature to 
fight to control the 
tuition levels and 
their increases that 
are being mandated 
by the state to the 
Kansas Board of 
Regents, which is 
the largest increase 
to hit students 
financially. 



As a student sen- 
ator, I would ensure 
that all measures to 
increase student 
fees are meticulous- 
ly researched and 
reviewed before 
supporting their pas- 
sage, a technique 
not utilized by the 
current system. 
Additionally, I 
believe there are a 
number of ways to 
more efficiently allo- 
cate student monies 
which should be 
employed and which 
would return spend- 
ing decisions to the 
students. 



To control the 
cost of tuition and 
student fees, we 
would allow off-track 
betting and create a 
lottery on campus. 
Both of these would 
be creative and 
entertaining ways of 
controlling costs. 
Another way would 
be privatization of 
the Union. 



I'd support some 
badly needed 
spending cuts. The 
cost of some pro- 
grams that "benefit 
students" don't merit 
their existence. 
Priorities need to be 
put in order with the 
knowledge that 
money is a Unite 
resource. 



What would you do 

to enhance the 
quality of stuoent 
ufe at k-state? 

By not voting for 
any spending that is 
irresponsible, I will 
be using student 
money to its utmost 
efficiency. 



As a student sen- 
ator, I believe that 
the cost of educa- 
tion has the largest 
impact on student 
life at K- State. Thus, 
before any student 
fees are increased 
and tuition is raised, 
I believe we have to 
cut away the luxu- 
ries from the SGA 
budget and force 
the administration to 
pay Its fair share of 
the expenditures 
within the student 
government budget, 
such as staff 
salaries. 

Academically and 
socially, the quality 
of student life needs 
significant improve- 
ment. By enhancing 
those characteristics 
which make K-State 
a quality 
institution — 
student/faculty/ 
administration 
relations, student 
programming, 
outstanding 
research and 
instruction and stu- 
dent intellectual pur- 
suits — through a 
more pro-active 
Student Governing 
Association, the 
overall environment 
at K-State will be 
enriched. 

(Mo response 
given to question 2) 



Quality of life can 
be increased 
through spending 
cuts. If we cut junk 
that really isn't 
needed, then we 
can leave money in 
the students' pock- 
ets, and they can 
spend it where they 
want. 



What makes you 

more qualified for 
tms position than 
your opponents? 

I've been a 
Student Senate 
intern for a year, 
and I'm tired of 
watching our money 
being misused. With 
a vote, I'll change it. 



I have worked 
one year in Senate. 
This and my two 
years as student 
body president at 
Johnson County 
Community College 
give me the experi- 
ence to handle stu- 
dent problems. 



Aa a Senate 
Finance Committee 
member and an 
individual with 
diverse campus 
involvement and a 
genuine concern, I 
will utilize my 
accrued knowledge 
and abilities to get 
the job done. 



We have new 
and innovative ideas 
for solving problems 
with our University. 
Also, we have the 
drive and determi- 
nation to get the job 
done. 



a) My head Is 
screwed on straight. 

b) I know that 
money shouldn't be 
thrown around. 

c) I've observed 
as a Senate intern 
that "b" happens 

too often. 





1 Most students 


If the Union 


1 am a former 




would like to see 


Enhancement 


senator, a former 




their fees lowered, 


Project goes 


campaign manager 




but few would be 


through and 1 get 


for Senor Ed Skoog 




happy if things for 


elected, 1 will do 


— Heroe de la 




which those fees 


everything in my 


Revolucidn — and a 




paid disappeared 


senatorial power to 


former Collegian 




from this campus. 1 


make sure the new 


editor and colum- 




will not vote for any 


Union is a student 


nist, 1 am currently 




fee increase without 


Union. 


your student body 


DAVID 

Frese 


seeing some very 


No promises 


vice president. 


convincing evidence 


here, but 1 would 




that the fee will 


also work to get Neil 




Mfitor 


greatly benefit stu- 
dents in a direct 


Young to play the 
Welcome Back 










manner. 


Concert. 





KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, April 12, 1M4 




MICHAEL 

Henry 



trd rnwtunng 




HlGERD 



InMrnaml itudwi 




KORI 



Keeton 



pre-law and poWicit i 



Kukula 



MATT 

Niemann 



pNtotophy 



Ring 



What would tou do 
to control 

THE COST OF TUmON 
AND STUDENT FEES? 

Force the state to 
take responsibility 
tor the regent univer- 
sities and work with 
the Kansas Board of 
Regents in adopting 
an index to control 
tuition. Seventy per- 
cent of our students 
are on some sort of 
financial aid, and the 
state needs to quit 
putting so much of 
the burden of higher 
education on its 
students. 



Tuition is deter- 
mined by the state 
Legislature. In order 
to keep tuition 
increases low, 
Student Senate 
needs to be more 
aggressive with its 
lobbying efforts. 

No one wants an 
increase in student 
fees, so if Student 
Senate raises fees, 
you can be sure It la 
for a dam good 
reason. 

I think the 
proposed Union 
Expansion project 
will generate revenue 
for the University in 
the future to keep 
tuition cost increases 
minimal. Presently, I 
believe we as stu- 
dents need to direct 
our attention to the 
state legislators, con- 
centrating our efforts 
at lobbying along 
with direct interaction 
with our representa- 
tives to petition our 
economic concerns. 



Although tuition is 
regulated by the 
Kansas Legislature, 
students do have a 
voice. I know many 
legislators, and I 
make it a priority to 
let them know that 
we do not want our 
tuition increased. 
Student fees are reg- 
ulated by Student 
Senate. It is up to us 
to elect fiscally 
responsible senators 
such as myself. 





I don't necessarily 
believe that we need 
to "control the cost" 
of tuition and fees. 
What we need to do 
is to ensure that stu- 
dents see their 
money put to work 
for them. This 
includes our profes- 
sors, who need bet- 
ter pay — even if that 
means more tuition 
increases. 



Senate has 
created a privileged- 
fee committee which 
reviews fees to 
assure that student 
money is used effi- 
ciently so students 
aren't taxed for use- 
less things. Students 
have little say in 
tuition, but senators 
can get involved 
through lobbying 
efforts. We need to 
take an active role to 
assure that the stu- 
dent voice is heard. 



What would too do 
to enhance the 
quality of stuoent 
ufe at k-state? 

Review the way 
student fee monies 
are handled and 
guarantee more 
money for student 
clubs and organiza- 
tions and less for 
institutional services. 
These clubs add 
more to enhance the 
student life and pro- 
gramming more than 
anything else. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



ilMhii 



What hakes you 
more qualified for 
ths1 position than 
tour opponents? 

I worked as chair- 
man of the legisla- 
tive affairs. I served 
as an arts and sci- 
ences student sena- 
tor and as the 
Associated Students 
of Kansas campus 
director. 




My quality of life 
"to-do list" includes 
fixing the parking 
problem, improving 
campus safety and 
resolving differences 
over bike permits with 
Parking Services. 



I plan to enhance 
student life by work- 
ing more closely with 
the Union boards in 
planning and arrang- 
ing concerts and cul- 
tural programs. My 
hopes are to 
increase student 
opportunities on 
campus. I plan to 
meet with student 
organizations to learn 
their viewpoints in 
order to effectively 
represent them. 



To make K-State a 
more enjoyable 
place, I would pro- 
mote student Interac- 
tion through active 
involvement in "fes- 
tivities" on campus. 
For instance, when 
several organizations 
set up booths in front 
of the Union that 
sponsored hands-on 
activities tor the stu- 
dents, I saw interac- 
tion between stu- 
dents that truly 
enhanced the quality 
of life at K-State. 



If the referendum 
allowing Union 
expansion passes, I 
feel that it is crucial 
to allow the students, 
themselves, to 
decide what will go 
into the new Union. 
The expansion holds 
the greatest opportu- 
nities for enhancing 
campus life, if it Is left 
up to the students. 



I would work hard 
to make life easier for 
students by providing 
more convenient ser- 
vices. I would like to 
see enrollmentflee 
payment done by 
phone — no more 
standing in lines for 
hours. Also, if the 
Union enhancement 
project is passed, we 
can use this opportu- 
nity to assure that 
services are 
expanded. 



CHARLEY 

Herbic 



What would tou do 

to control 

the cost of tuition 

and student fees? 

Transfer the 
already generated 
alumni fund money 
to help off-set the 
rising cost of tuition 
and student tees. 
Abandon the imple- 
mentation of food 
and retail stores in 
the Union. This will 
significantly reduce 
the proposed hike in 
the student fees. 



As a Senate 
intern, I learned how 
Senate functions and 
how to get things 
done. This knowl- 
edge is valuable con- 
sidering the impor- 
tance of upcoming 
issues. 




JASONOMARR 

Johnson 

IMWIOrl 



I believe my 
integrity sets me 
apart from my 
opponents. My 
determination and 
work ethic will enable 
me to bean 
upstanding 
representative for my 
college. 




SICCA 

KORPHAGE 



My unmatched 
desire to work for 
students makes me 
most qualified to be 
your representative. 
I'm a dedicated, 
experienced and 
responsible student. 
Plain and simple. 



DAN 

Lewerenz 



tunny 
pMcaophy 



I have no SQA 
experience and do 
not care much tor 
politics, but I have 
very real concerns 
about the future sta- 
tus of this university. 




AARON 

Otto 



This year, I served 
as sn Arts and 
Sciences senator 
and as Senate's 
communications 
committee chair. I am 
a hard-working per- 
son who always 
gives 110 percent In 
everything. 




I am very much 
interested in legisla- 
tive affairs at K- 
State, even though 
the Partnership tor 
Excellence Is dead. 
If elected, I'll be lob- 
bying in Topeka for 
price ceiling (tuition 
cap) and a possible 
end to arbitrary 
hikes in tuition we've 
been experiencing. 



I would work with 
the Legislature 
through an 
increased lobbying 
effort to keep tuition 
under control for the 
students. I would 
evaluate each cur- 
rent fee and pro- 
posed fees to 
ensure the students 
get the most bene- 
fits with the least 
cost. 



Students have 
little control over the 
tuition structure. If 
the Kansas Board of 
Regents or the 
Legislature wanted 
to raise our tuition, I 
would fight it until a 
proposal included 
increased financial 
aid and funding tor 
campus improve- 
ment {salary 
increases, program- 
ming funds, etc.). 



I plan to fight 
against the current 
trend of students 
picking up more of 
the University's 
expenses — for 
example, remodel- 
ing buildings or pay- 
ing for faculty salary 
increases. I plan to 
lobby the Kansas 
Legislature to pro- 
vide more adequate 
funding for the 
state's universities. 



As a senator for 
the past year, I have 
consistently 
opposed fee 
increases and allo- 
cations from the 
activity fee, which 
wouldn't significantly 
benefit most stu- 
dents. Senators 
must remember that 



SCOTT 



the majority of K- 
ROTTINGHAUS Staters can't afford 
fee increases. I will 
continue to promote 
fiscal responsibility 
when dealing with 
student money. 



What would tou 00 
to enhance the 
quauty of stuoent 
life at k-state? 

Propose a num- 
ber of ethnically and 
racially diverse activ- 
ities, lectures, con- 
certs and classes. 
This will enable all 
students to become 
more informed of 
events surrounding 
them. 



The Union 
enhancement pro- 
ject is already under 
way, and it's going 
to take some time to 
complete. Since the 
Union is a represen- 
tative of K-State ... 
that is where my 
energy bill will be 
spent. 



Enhancing the 
quality of student life 
encompasses many 
issues, and in my 
opinion, the most 
important of these is 
campus security and 
safety. I would lobby 
for better lighting 
and security equip- 
ment, a care cab 
system and 
increased funding of 
the KSU Police by 
the administration. 



I hope to bring 
Senate's focus back 
to the students. 
While recent events 
have forced Senate 
to address more 
academic and leg- 
islative issues, the 
future should allow 
SQA to spend more 
time and energy 
addressing student 
life. Student involve- 
ment in Union 
expansion is essen- 
tial. Go, Dan, go. 



Student Senate is 
our voice with the 
administration and 
the state, which pro- 
vide both policy and 
funding for K-State, 
and I would like to 
add my voice to this 
body to help acquire 
student-friendly poli- 
cy and the money 
necessary to pro- 
vide a quality higher 
education. 



We should 
continue to support 
enhancement in the 
library, the Union 
and the Rec. I would 
also work on acade- 
mic issues, such as 
improvement of 
teaching quality, 
closed classes, 
more minors pro- 
grams and better 
advising. Improving 
our relations and 
communication with 
faculty and adminis- 
tration would help 
advance these 
issues. 



What hakes tou 



TH» POSmON THAN 
YOUR OPPONENTS? 

Previous experi- 
ence in Student 
Government will 
allow me to get the 
job done. I also have 
the desire to see that 
student's needs am 



I've been Involved 
with Senate since 
the beginning of this 
year, not as a sena- 
tor or Intern but as a 
concerned student. 



Varied experi- 
ence in K-State 
leadership and 
activities enables 
me to relate to 
everyone in some 
way, listen to their 
needs and want and 
implement them. 



I am concerned 
with student repre- 
sentation. Many 
senators don't even 
come to half of the 
meetings. I will show 
up, and I will care. 



As a Senate 
intern, I have an 
understanding of 
how K-State oper- 
ates. I'll give your 
concerns a voice. 
Let me know them. 



I have enthusias- 
tically served as 
president of the Arts 
and Sciences 
Student Council and 
as a student sena- 
tor, working to 
Improve K-State tor 
students. 



Q Tuesday, April 12, 1994 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Seely 



Ju«W 




RACHEL 

Smith 



Engtoh and mwi itudm 




MARK 

Tomb 



fwytfwkw 




What would you do 
to control 
the cost of tuition 
and student fee 5? 

For the past two 
terms as student 
senator, I have 
voted against each 
and every fee 
Increase, and for 
each and every fee 
decrease. I will con- 
tinue to do that if I 
am re-elected. 
Students are paying 
too much! And 
Senate can control it 
by a majority vote! 



What would you do 
to enhance the qual- 
ity of student ufe at 
K-State? 

By focusing on 
the basic reasons 
we are at college — 
tor an education. By 
Improving the quality 
of student life, you 
are improving stu- 
dents' quality of edu- 
cation. This is 
through services, 
classrooms, activi- 
ties and experienc- 
ing which I will 
always continue to 
support. 



II mm in 



What makes you 

more qualified for 
this position than 
your opponents? 

I have heard 
complaints about 
campus life through 
my radio show, "A 
Purple Affair.* I will 
use this show to 
communicate 
"what's happening" 
in Senate. 



I would make 
efforts to channel 
student money 
where it would bene- 
fit students most. I 
also would encour- 
age senators to 
demand quality and 
efficiency in student- 
funded services. I 
also am committed 
to protecting acade- 
mic programs and 
student-friendly poli- 
cy at KSU 



I have 
demonstrated my 
commitment 
to students by 
supporting student- 
friendly policy and 
have consistently 
voted to keep fees 
low while 

maintaining quality 
in programs. 



Tuition control is 
contingent upon sig- 
nificant lobbying 
efforts by student 
leaders. Legislators 
need to be constant- 
ly reminded how 
important tuition cost 
control is. As far as 
fees are concerned, 
senators must main- 
tain responsible 
spending of student 
dollars by demand- 
ing student groups 
make efforts to raise 
money before 
requesting student 
funding. 

Senate really only 
has a recommenda- 
tion of what the fees 
should be, It ulti- 
mately rests in the 
hands of the 
Legislature and the 
Kansas Board of 
Regents. So, we 
need to have a 
strong team to lobby 
Topeka. When fees 
are inevitable, we 
need to maximize 
what we will get out 
of it. 



Eorrofi's mote: B.C. Camp II, Roe Rawumgs and Amy Steansoh will apkm on the bal- 
lot, BUT FAILED TO TURN M THE COLLEGIAN QUESTIONNAIRE BY THE OEADLME ON THE FORK. 



Continue support 
of the great projects 
SGA funds like lec- 
tures, conferences, 
performances and 
trips. When people 
participate in the 
activities, everybody 
on campus is effect- 
ed. 



As an intern last 
year, I've done 
everything a senator 
does except vote. I 
know the process, 
and I know what 
needs to be 
changed. 




SlEBERT 




Tadtman 




WlLROY 



What would you do 
to control 

THE COST Of TUmON 
AND STUDENT FEES? 

I would encour- 
age faculty to seek 
revenue for their 
salary increases 
elsewhere. They 
deserve to be paid 
more, but it's not the 
students' responsi- 
bility to fund this 
through tuition 
increases. The cost 
of student fees 
could possibly be 
controlled by identi- 
fying what portion of 
these fees is going 
toward the various 
services on campus. 

School is an 
investment, and the 
way to keep the 
monetary cost of 
that investment 
down is to weigh the 
costs and the 
benefits. Senate has 
a huge responsibility 
to direct student 
money to places 
that will likely pro- 
duce the most bene- 
fits to students. 
Efficiency is the key 
to responsible 
government. 



I believe that a 
more prudent alloca- 
tion of student 
money must be 
maintained in order 
to slow the growth of 
increasing costs. I 
believe the idea of a 
budget cap, which is 
set in the interest of 
students instead of 
wants is desirable. 



What would you do 
to enhance the 
quality of student 

UFE AT K-STATE? 

1 would encour- 
age student involve- 
ment at K-State. As 
a senator, I would 
promote the cam- 
pus-wide organiza- 
tions and make sure 
they're available to 
all students. I 
believe students can 
enhance the quality 
of their own lives by 
making the most of 
all the opportunities 
college has to offer. 



The K-State 
Union is going to be 
a big issue in the 
next few years, 
whether or not the 
Union Enhancement 
referendum passes. 
I will work to make 
sure that students 
have the informed 
input needed to 
keep this a student 
Union. 



I would not stray 
far from the projects 
now in the works. 
The terrific work by 
all here at K-State to 
bring many great 
people and perform- 
ers give different 
views and aspects 
of society. The 
upgrading of Farrell 
must be our No. 1 
focus, making the 
facility worthwhile 
and accessible and 
the stacks 
comprehendible. 



What hakes vou 

MORE QUALIFIED FOR 
THIS POSITION THAN 
YOUR OPPONENTS? 

No answer was 
available. 



No answer was 
available 



I feel the desire to 
serve others is what 
makes me most 
qualified for Student 
Senate. My greatest 
satisfactions in life 
have come from 
serving others, 
especially students. 

Responsibility in 
government means 
balancing costs and 
benefits to students 
as much as possi- 
ble. I am dedicated 
to the responsibility 
of keeping student 
costs down. 



Two *Mtttn 




CHRIS 

Jones 




Premer 



What would you do 
to control 
the cost of tuition 
ano student fees? 

I would propose a 
freeze on current stu- 
dents' tuition and put 
the increase on new 
students. This way, 
your tuition would 
remain constant as 
long as you are a full- 
time student. 



To control the cost 
of tuition and student 
fees, I would be 
aware of and 
informed about any 
current financial 
issue facing the 
Senate and/or the 
students of K-State. 
Being informed and 
educated about 
financial issues and 
student opinions Is 
the best way In my 
opinion to control stu- 
dent fees and tuition. 



What would you do 
to enhance the 
quality of student 
ufe at k-state? 

I would work on 
improving the safety 
on campus. This is 
extremely important, 
due to the late nights 
that we work as 
architecture students. 



My first step would 
be to listen and 
analyze the opinions 
and beliefs of the 
current students of 
K-State. Perfect 
examples of current 
issues that will 
Improve the current 
and future student 
life at K-State are 
parking improve- 
ments, Union 
expansion, quality 
faculty, and a fair and 
universal grading 
system. 



What makes you 

MORE QUALIFIED FOfl 

this position than 
your opponents? 

I'm already very 
active in my college, 
which allows me to 
be in contact with 
most students in my 
college. Such as: 
AIAS, ASLA, DSAC 
and EDSA. 



No answer was 
available. 



RE AND 1 






■ 




What would you do 


What would vou do 


What makes you 




TO CONTROL 


TO ENHANCE THE 


MORE QUALIFIED FOR 




THE COST OF TumON 


QUALITY OF STUDENT 


THIS POSITION THAN 




AND STUDENT FEES? 

1 1 believe that the 
best way to control 


UFE AT K-STATE? 

1 would 
communicate with 


YOUR OPPONENTS? 

1 am honest, 
hard-working and a 








the cost of tuition is 


the students in my 


good listener. 1 have 




to cut wasteful 


college to under- 


experience from 




spending. Money 


stand exactly what it 


working on Open 




should be spent to 


is that concerns 


House, serving on a 




hire qualified teach- 


them. 1 would serve 


judicial board and 




ers as well as for 


as a liaison between 


being a member of 




providing services to 


the college and the 


an advisory council 




students. 


Senate. Each stu- 
dent in the college 


for the college. 




CHRIS 




would have the 




JUERGENS 




opportunity to 
express his or her 




NTlWodr VCfMhftCKriV 




concerns and ideas. 




Eorrofi's note: Kb 


«JY CONKUN WILL APPEAR ON THE BALLOT, BUT FAJLED TO 




tunn m the Collegia* 


OvESDONNAHE BY THE DEADLINE ON THE FORM, 





KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



College of Business Administration 



Tu.mday, April 12, 1994 



9 




CASEY 

Carlson 

frwftmari 



What would you do 

TO CONTROL 

Tr* COST OF TUITION 

AND STUDENT FEES? 

As a Senate rep- 
resentative, I would 
examine any finan- 
cial Increase careful- 
ly to determine 
whether it benefits 
my constituents and 
the students at 
Kansas State. I 
would support legis- 
lation, which is a 
direct result of fiscal 
responsibility and 
frugality. 



What would you do 
to enhance the 
quality of student 
life at k-state? 

Issues such as 
the diversity overlay, 
Union Enhancement 
and campus annex- 
ation have a direct 
effect on the quality 
of student life at K- 
State. I would 
attempt to inform 
students when these 
types of situations 
occur so that I might 
represent their opin- 
ions correctly 
Informed students 
are quality students. 



What hakes you 
more qualified for 
this position than 
your opponents? 

Informed, commu- 
nicator, enthusiastic, 
involved, mature, 
receptive, rational, 
cooperative, leader, 
responsible, practi- 
cal, open-minded, 
determined, stable, 
accountable, honest, 
organized, curious. 
youthful, energetic, 
dedicated, reason- 
able, responsive, 
trustworthy. 




CHUCK 

HaynesJr. 

buttnaui 



What would you DO 

TO CONTROL 

THE COST OF TUITION 

AND STUDENT FEES? 

Anyone that has 
seen my voting 
record over the past 
year in Senate 
would see that I'm a 
slasher of student 
fees. I sat on the 
committee that 
decreased the 
Lafenefee by $10 If 
elected, I would con- 
tinue to slash every 
un needed fee and 
work to keep tuition 
fixed. 



What would you do 
to enhance the 

QUA LTTY Of STUDENT 
LIFE AT K-STATE? 

I believe getting in 
touch with the stu- 
dents and hearing 
their concerns and 
views on student life 
is the key to success 
in being a senator. 
Taking those con- 
cerns to the floor of 
the Senate and vot- 
ing toward those 
concerns gets the 
job done in improv- 
ing the quality of stu- 
dent life. 



What hakes you 
more qualified for 

THIS POSmON THAN 
YOUR OPPONENTS? 

Experience! 
That" b why I feel I'm 
qualified for this 
position. I know how 
things work and how 
things get done on 
the Senate floor. 




DEREK 

Kreifels 



■ophomof* 



Fiscal 
responsibility! As a 
current senator, this 
is what I have lived 
by when it comes to 
student fees. I have 
not voted for one fee 
increase this year. 
As far as tuition is 
concerned, I can 
only oppose the 
Partnership for 
Excellence and 
encourage our 
legislature not to 
increase It. 



Continue to work 
for a "fiscally respon- 
sible" Student 
Senate. Fiscal 
responsibility Is also 
knowing when a pro- 
ject will better a 
majority of the stu- 
dents. One such 
project is the K-State 
Union Expansion. I 
encourage students 
to vote for the 
expansion. 



My experience as 
a business senator, 
Senate intern, KSU 
United Way student 
Chair and my Intern- 
ship with Speaker 
Robert Miller make 
me more qualified. 



More and more 
students have begun 
to use credit cards 
as means for paying 
tuition and other 
expenses. As a sen- 
ator, I would pro- 
pose a referendum 
to re-evaluate the 
actual cost of a KSU 
education. I would 
also propose a bill 
MCCRACKEN that would increase 
fc**» ^. hourly wages for on- 

campus student 
employees. 




JAMES 



I would make sure 
students had the 
final say on Union 
expansion and 
renovation. I would 
work to alleviate the 
parking problems. I'd 
also make our 
campus safer by 
having our police 
patrol on foot or 
bicycles. In addition, 
I would make more 
bike racks and paths 
available 
to students. 



How many 
candidates can 
honestly say they've 
visited over 
50 campuses and 
student unions 
across the country 
withtn the last two 
years? I have. 



tfcte 



MICHELE 

Meier 



I would do every- 
thing in my power, 
but you must under- 
stand that Student 
Senate cannot con- 
trol this entirely. I will 
make certain that 
what happens is 
beneficial to you as 
a student. 



I would start with 
Union Expansion to 
make the Union 
more user friendly. I 
believe if campus 
organizations and 
outside vendors 
were more centrally 
located, then the 
Union could be more 
beneficial 
to all students. 



Experience! 
Leadership ability) I 
care about the stu- 
dent! I'll get the job 
done! 




JOHN 

RlEDEL 



pjMf 



Tuition and fees 
are expected to rise 
rapidly in the future. 
Because these 
increases will make 
college no longer 
affordable for some 
students, the 
Kansas Legislature 
needs to help 
cushion the effect. I 
will work to obtain 
additional state 
funding so 
no student will be 
left out in the cold. 



An obvious 
concern at K-State is 
that of creating fair 
and equitable 
parking. Students 
are not getting the 
voice they deserve 
on this issue. With 
enrollment of more 
than 20,000, we are 
a major force, and I 
will see to it that this 
strength be utilized 
to its fullest 
potential. 



My speciality isn't 
in wordy speeches 
or excess hype. 
What I offer is a 
sincere commitment 
and strong work 
ethic to improve 
Kansas State. 



SOMMERFIELD 



I would first need 
to see an 

expenditure report, 
but I would like to 
see if money from 
other non-essential 
areas can be 
re-allocated to pre- 
vent the students 
from paying more. I 
know what it is like 
to be short on cash. 
That is why control- 
ling the cost of 
tuition is 
so important. 



No answer was 
available. 



I am honest and 
trustworthy. I am a 
member of Beta 
Sigma Psi. I am also 
a member of Kappa 
Kappa Psi, 
a honorary music 
fraternity, and hold 
the office of secre- 
tary. I am extremely 
active on campus 
and will stand up for 
the 

students in the 
College of Business. 
I will vote for what is 
in the best interests 
of the people 
I represent. 




ii I 



SCOTT 

Taddiken 



The cost of tuition 
and fees keep going 
up every year. We 
all realize that there 
has to be costs, but I 
will work to make 
sure that all of these 
costs are justified. 



One thing I want 
to do is to make bet- 
ter use of the 
teacher evaluations. 
This way, students 
will know which pro- 
fessors to stay away 
from and which are 
good teachers. 



I am a good can- 
didate because I am 
open-minded and 
listen to all sides of a 
story. I am also dedi- 
cated to what I do. 




BRENT 

Varzaly 



As a student 
senator, I will push 
for beer sales at ath- 
letic events. The 
additional revenue 
can be used to elimi- 
nate the athletic fee 
and halt the increase 
in tuition. 



I will restructure 
physical education 
requirements to 
allow students to 
enroll in classes 
such as tennis, 
Softball, or swimming 
to fulfill that 
requirement. 



I will work to intro- 
duce new ideas into 
the Student Senate, 
such as beer sales 
at athletic events 
and class require- 
ments. 




Weatherman 



•ophomon 



To control tuition 
and fees, I'd start by 
trimming the fat in 
allocations, then I'd 
advocate placing the 
athletic fee and 
health tee only on 
the students that 
attend sporting 
events and use 
Lafene, respectively. 
These are unneces- 
sary tees that not all 
students should 
have to pay. 



To enhance the 
students' lives, I 
would start acting on 
actual student 
concerns. I think the 
students have been 
ignored for too long. 
For example, SGA 
spent thousands of 
dollars to research 
the parking problem, 
and what do we 
have as a result? A 
Union expansion ref- 
erendum? Hello!!? 



I'm more qualified 
because I'm not 
content with just 
sitting in Forum Hall 
on Thursdays taking 
up space. I want to 
work 
for the students. 




CLAYTON 

Wheeler 



As a multiple-term 
senator, I have 
consistently voted to 
save money. 
Currently, I feel 
there is a lot of 
unnecessary 
spending and 
duplicate services 
on campus. A tight 
fist on allocations, 
both special and 
regular, will save 
money and 
Inevitably lower your 
fees. 



I feel any 
student's quality of 
life will be enhanced 
if students are 
getting the most 
bang lor their buck. 
It, as senator, we 
abort the ideology of 
tax and spend, and 
focus on a more 
conservative method 
of allocation money 
them, we will 
enhance the quality 
of student life 
at K-State. 



I have been 
involve in Senate for 
three terms and feel 
that with my 
experience, 
motivation, 
dedication and 
insight to the 
problems of K-State. 
I am the right choice. 



Editor's note: Matt Crocker , Paul Dahh aw Justm Williams mx appear 

ON THE BALLOT, BUT FAILED TO TURN W THE COLLEGIA* QUESTIONNAIRE BY THE DEADLINE ON 
THE FORM. 



A Q Tuesday, April f 2, 1994 



,- M . mm i . • * - iMfl 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 






College of Education 




What would you do 
to control 
the cost of tuttion 
and student fees? 

I feel that I will 
consult the students 
with whatever the 
increase or decrease 
would be In both 
tuition and student 
fees. I feel that the 
control in these deci- 
sions should be with 
the students. 



What would you do 

TO ENHANCE THE 

QUALITY OF STUDENT 
UFE AT K-STATE? 

I think that the 
student life at K- 
State can be 
enhanced In many 
ways. I plan on 
being able to offer 
programs and activi- 
ties that will be able 
to make every stu- 
dent feel at home. 



What makes you 

MORE OUAUFCD FOR 
THIS POSTTION THAN 
YOUR OPPONENTS? 

I feel I am Quali- 
fied (or this position 
because I am a stu- 
dent who will not jus* 
talk about what I will 
do, but i will take 
action. 




Jermlne 

ALBERTY 



CHRIS 

Glenn 



What would you do 

to control 

THE COST OF TUmON 
AND STUDENT FEES? 

I would like to 
see a student on the 
Kansas Board of 
Regents and a 
greater effort to fund 
higher education by 
the Legislature. If 
these things are 
done, there will be 
less or a need to 
raise student fees. 



What would you do 
to enhance the 

QUALITY Of STUDENT 
UFE AT K-STATE? 

Address the park- 
ing and Lafene prob- 
lems. Also, I would 
like to see more stu- 
dents involved in 
campus activities. 



What makes you 
more qualified for 
this position than 
your opponents? 

I have been a part 
of Student Senate 
for two years. Next 
year, I would like to 
help the SGA contin- 
ue in a positive 
direction. 



•ducaHan 




MATT 



SOLDNER 



I would control the 
cost of attending K- 
State by being sure 
the money allocated 
by SGA is spent only 
on things beneficial 
to all students. 
Existing fees should 
be more stringently 
reviewed to ensure 
we are really getting 
our money's worth. 



This year in 
Senate we have 
taken many steps to 
enhance quality of 
life on campus. 
Plans for Union 
expansion, free 
athletic and theater 
tickets, and an 
increase in 
programming have 
all been started. I 
would work to make 
these goals a reality. 



A year in student 
government has 
given me the 
experience needed 
to be sure the 
College of 
Education's needs 
are met and its goals 
accomplished. 




I was discussing 
this with Paut Damm 
(of the Lucky Party, 
running for Senate in 
the College of 
Business), and I 
think his ideas are 
right on. 



DOUG 

LaMunyon 



The quality of stu- 
dent life lies in the 
hearts of the stu- 
dents. All that can be 
received from a col- 
lege experience is 
what you put into it. I 
would encourage 
more on-campus 
participation from 
students even if it's 
only a smile and 
"hello," or pursuing 
clubs and student 
offices. 



My great-great- 
great grandpappy 
used to say that 
claiming 

over-qualification 
can be 

dangerous. So, just 
do your beat. 



Eorrcw's note: Tom Henderson will appear on the ballot, but failed to compute 
the Collegian questionnaire by the deadline on the form. 






College of Engineering 



Wftmmm 




SCOTT 

Adams 



What would vou do 

TO CONTROL 

THE COST OF TUITION 
AND STUDENT FEES? 

To control stu- 
dents' costs, I would 
go against any new 
proposals that would 
increase student 
fees unless com- 
pletely necessary. 
Students already 
pay for many things 
they never use or 
don't know exist. 



pr*-ll* 




CHRIS 

Flanigan 




PAUL R. 

Hrenchir 



Before I pass 
judgment on any 
such proposal, I will 
first thoroughly 
review the matter 
with the Student 
Senate Legislative 
Affairs and Finance 
committees, after 
which time I will 
make an unbiased 
and educated deci- 
sion that I feel will 
benefit the students. 



As a student 
here at K-State, I 
am keenly aware of 
increases in tuition. 
In order to attempt 
to control tuition 
hikes and increases 
in student fees, I, as 
a senator, would lis- 
ten to the pros and 
cons of bills. I would 
also ask students 
how they felt about 
them. Then, based 
on what I've heard, 
place my vote. 



What would you do 
to enhance the 
quality of student 
ufe at k-state? 

Parking Services 
needs to be 
improved. Students 
shouldn't have to 
buy a permit and still 
not have a place to 
park. I would also 
like to extend the 
faculty's office hours 
to better fit students' 
needs. I see this as 
a must, being an 
engineering major. 



I plan to enhance 
student life on cam- 
pus by being 
assertive when 
addressing the con- 
cerns of the student 
body. Careful and 
diligent considera- 
tion is what I believe 
would make stu- 
dents feel more 
comfortable about 
the environment 
here at K-State, 



To enhance the 
quality of student 
life at K-State, I 
would try to help 
find a solution to the 
eternal search for 
better parking. I 
also would like to 
find a better solution 
to the Union bill now 
on the agenda, 
where the fee 
increase and other 
aspects of the bill 
leaves something to 
be desired. 



What makes you 
more qualified for 
this position than 
your opponents? 

I am in touch with 
what students want. 
They're tired of pay- 
ing higher fees and 
sick of the present 
parking situation. 




What would you do 


What would you do 


What makes you 


TO CONTROL 


TO ENHANCE THE 


MORE QUALIFIED FOR 


THE COST OF TUITION 


QUALITY OF STUDENT 


THIS POSITION THAN 


AND STUDENT FEES? 


UFE AT K-STATE? 


YOUR OPPONENTS? 


First, Senate 


To better the 


1 have been 


really has no control 


quality of student 


involved in student 


over tuition. 


life, I'd fight for 


governments for a 



BOWEN 



I am not a politi- 
cian. My objectives 
are to represent stu- 
dents to the best of 
my ability and pro- 
vide a fresh per- 
spective on current 
issues. 




To control fees, 1 
would do my best to 
stop the passing of 
fees that don't 
benefit the students. 
For example, all full- 
time students are 
forced to pay $17 in 
athletic fees and 
receive nothing in 
return. 



I would make sure 
the resources avail- 
able are spent as 
wisely as possible. 



increased parking 
space on campus. 
Also, I'd like to see 
improved escort 
services and better 
lighting on campus 
to stop people from 
being attacked at 
night. I'd also like to 
get the students 
more involved in 
campus-related 
issues. 

I would make and 
improve group 
organizations and 
activities so they are 
more beneficial and 
supportive 
to the students. 



long time and realize 
the amount of time 
and effort needed to 
get the job done. 



I believe my quali- 
ties of good judg- 
ment, impartial think- 
ing and honesty 
would make me 
more qualified than 
my opponents. 



DREW 

Hartmann 



I think what 
makes me more 
qualified than my 
opponents are my 
years here at K- 
State hearing peo- 
ple argue about 
what* s being done 
and getting a 
unique insight to 
how they feel about 
many issues. 




TODD 

Lakin 

mdudnal ingtfiMnng I 



First, we need to 
continuously review 
the student fees to 
ensure the most ser- 
vices and benefits 
possible for the stu- 
dent dollar. 
Secondly, we need 
to work with the 
state Legislature and 
have them under- 
stand that the main 
financial burden for 
state universities 
should be on the 
state and not the 
students. 



I believe that 
Union enhancement 
will be a great first 
step in improving the 
quality of life at K- 
State. The increase 
in the Union 
Program Council's 
budget to bring bet- 
ter shows and 
events along with an 
outside area for stu- 
dents to come 
together would be 
tremendous 
improvements. Other 
issues such as park- 
ing problems, includ- 
ing eliminating Rec 
parking tickets, 
would help. 



As a two-term 
senator, my experi- 
ence dealing with 
student issues such 
as the plus-minus 
system puts me at 
an advantage over 
my opponents. 



Graduate School 



Editor's noti: chuntao Yak, bremm haunw and chm av&a «ru mmmwimw^mfmmy9wmmwi9tuam»mMiim»mnntmimmmwiftKk 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



TfciMda* April 12, 1904 



College of Engineering 



11 




What would you do 
to control 

THE COST OF TUmOW 
AND STUDENT FEES? 

I would make 
sure all available 
funds were being 
used to best suit the 
students' needs. 
Furthermore, I 
would make sure 
students' voices 
were heard on any 
possible tuition or 
student fee 
increase. 



What would you do 
to enhance the qual- 
ity of student life at 
K-State? 

I would stop 
wasteful spending 
and use the money 
to help solve some 
of the ongoing prob- 
lems on campus, 
such as parking. 



Eight Mrtatra 

What makes you 
more qualified fob 

THIS POSmON THAN 
YOUR OPPONENTS? 

With my many 
years here at K- 
State, I feat I am In 
touch with my 
peers, and easily 
accessible and 
open to their opin- 
ions. 




TIM 

McCune 




I will lobby to 
reduce or eliminate 
some fees that stu- 
dents rarely or 
never use. 



I will work on a 
solution to the park- 
ing problem. Til sup- 
port the Union 
expansion. 



I have been at re- 
state for three 
years and have 
contact with a 
diverse group of 
students. 










What would you do 


What would you oo 


What hakes you 


TO CONTROL 


TO ENHANCE THE 


MORE QUALIFIED FOR 


THE COST OF TUmON 


QUALITY OF STUDENT 


THIS POSmON THAN 


ANO STUDENT FEES? 


LIFE AT K-STATE? 


YOUR OPPONENTS? 


Students at K- 


The students 


Because I'm good 


State pay the fees, 


need to have a more 


enough, I'm smart 


so students should 


active role in student 


enough, and, dam it, 


have more control 


government. 1 want 


people like met 


over where those 


to keep my con- 




fees go. If elected, 1 


stituents informed, 




will not vote for any 


and 1 want them to 




tuition or fee increas- 


keep me informed. 




es unless the stu- 


More communication 




dents themselves 


will help you guys 




have made It clear 


see the things you 




that* s what they 


want at K -State. 




want. 






The students' 


1 believe that the 


1 have read and 


greatest concern 


single best thing that 


studied the book on 


right now is the rising 


student government 


the parking problem. 


cost of a college 


can do to better stu- 


and 1 believe 1 under- 


education. 1 would 


dents' lives at K- 


stand It better than 


personally oppose 


Stafe is to help them 


my opponents. 1 


any increase in fees 


in the pocketbook. 1 


have well-formulated 


or tuition made by 


would work to give 


ideas on the 


the student govern- 


students the option 


University's prob- 


ment, and 1 would 


of renting their text- 


lems. 



JASON 

Mitchell 



PHILIP 

MUDD 




ALBERT 

Oyerly 




DAN 

Stack 



chvnwal (ngnMhrg 



To control tuition 
costs, I think we 
need a strong lobby 
In the state 
Legislature to tell 
our representatives 
how K-States feels. 
To control the cost 
of student fees, I 
personally will not 
vote for any fee 
increases during my 
term. 



I would push for 
strict and efficient 
control of the bud- 
get. Even though 
costs are always 
rising, efficiency 
could keep tuition 
and student fee 
increases to a mini- 
mum. Secondly, I 
would like to help in 
improving relations 
with the state legis- 
lature to give 
K-State more of a 
voice in future 
decisions. 



I think that if we 
could make the 
campus as safe as 
possible, this would 
do a lot toward 
enhancing the quali- 
ty of life. I also think 
that letting students 
spend their own 
money, instead of 
having to spend it 
on fees, would help 
greatly. 



I would really like 
to eliminate parking 
tickets at the Rec 
Complex and help 
to solve the rest of 
the parking problem 
to please the major- 
ity. I also feel the 
Union Expansion 
referendum is a 
step in the right 
direction as long as 
the cost is kept to a 
minimum. 



I believe that 
after attending K- 
State for four years, 
t understand how 
the typical engineer- 
ing student feels 
and thinks. 




JARED C. 

Seery 



Being a sopho- 
more, I feel lean 
bring in new leader- 
ship with new ideas 
along with the ener- 
gy and motivation to 
make a difference. 




SUMPTER 



encourage that it be 
put to a vote by the 
students. In addition, 
I would see to it that 
wasteful spending is 

I am amazed at 
some of the pro- 
grams that students 
must pay for just to 
be enrolled at te- 
state. Some of these 
programs are ineffi- 
ciently run, while oth- 
ers are pure trash. I 
intend to work on 
behalf of my voters 
to reduce this poorly- 
run bureaucracy. 



There would be 
no way to control the 
cost of tuition. 
However, if elected, I 
would represent your 
decisions to increase 
or decrease the stu- 
dent fees. 



books instead of 
having to buy them. 



Keep fees at a 
minimum, while pro- 
viding the voter with 
the maximum 
amount of useful 
resources. 



Integrity. 
Knowledge, 
Courage. 
Decisiveness. 
Dependability. 
Initiative. Tact. 
Justice. Bearing. 
Endurance. 
Unselfishness. 
Loyalty. Judgment. 
Any questions? 



I will make sure 
that several issues 
that were brought up 
before Senate this 
year be carried out 
next year, such as a 
Care Cab, continuing 
to reduce unneeded 
fees and Union 
Expansion. 



As a Student 
Senate Intern for the 
1993-94 fiscal year, 
I received all 
responsibilities of 
senators except 
voting privileges. 
This makes me 
extremely 
qualified. 



Enron's note: Joe Stbn will appear on the sauot, but failed to answer the 

COLLEQUW QUESTKMWURE SY THE DEADUNE ON THE POML 



College of Human Ecology 




House, Jr. 



prajHTj#dtcm« and 




MICHELLE R. 

Bennett 



What would you do 
to control 
the cost of tuition 
and student fees? 

Control of tuition 
and student fees 
rests largely on the 
state legislature. 
Through lobbying of 
Kansas' universi- 
ties, unity might 
help send a mes- 
sage to legislation 
to combat rising 
fees. Legislature 
must be convinced 
that students are an 
investment in 
Kansas' future, and 
if unsupported, 
Kansas as a whole 
will suffer. 

I don't think that 
as one student we 
can do too much to 
control tuition. 
However, If we work 
together with 
someone who 
wants tuition 
change like you, we 
can make a 
difference. 1 would 
like to be that per- 
son, and maybe 
together with your 
vote we can make a 
change. 



What would you do 
to enhance the qual- 
ity of student life at 
K-State? 

To enhance the 
quality of life at K- 
State, I would want 
to rebuild the facul- 
ty/student relation- 
ship. This relation- 
ship has become 
tarnished by recent 
altercations. We 
need to re-establish 
this relationship and 
realize we need 
each other. Without 
students, there is no 
need for faculty, 
and vice versa. 



I would like to 
see more students 
involved in campus 
activities and 
participate in more 
organizations and 
festivities. Also, I 
believe that there 
should be a 
newsletter informing 
students of where 
their money Is 
going. 



What hakes you 
more qualified for 

this position than 
your opponents? 

I am more quali- 
fied tor Senate 
because I listen to 
students. I want to 
represent the major- 
ity I'm willing to put 
my personal views 
aside. 



t 


k 


WW 


J 



MIKE 

LVNGHAM 



What would you do 
to control 
the cost of tuition 
ano student fees? 

All students 
realize that we are 
responsible for some 
things around 
campus. I don't think 
the student fees 
have to be raised 
every time some- 
thing needs to be 
done. All other 
alternatives should 
be explored first. 



What would you do 
to enhance the 

quality of student 
life at k-state? 

One thing that I 
feel needs to be 
addressed is the 
parking problem. I've 
heard about It for as 
long as I've been 
here, and I think it 
needs to be dealt 
wtth. 



What makes you 

more qualified for 
this position than 
your opponents? 

I feel like I repre- 
sent the average K- 
State student well. I 
don't have any fur- 
ther political aspira- 
tions. This is my one 
shot. 



I don't think that 
one person is more 
qualified than 
anyone, but I would 
say my one quality 
is my concern for 
the students 
on campus. 




I would recom- 
mend a ceiling or 
spending cap on the 
percentage of stu- 
dent fees versus the 
rate of tuition costs; 
our portion of the fis- 
cal educational pie 
must not increase 
disproportionately. 



Winkler 



Obviously, 
improving the Union 
would be a priority to 
consider when 
pursuing the quality 
of student life 
at K-State. 
Additionally, I have a 
concern with social 
barriers within the 
University. It is para- 
mount that we make 
students eager to 
participate in 
atl-tnekjafve 
University events. 



The breadth of my 
background has 
demanded hard work 
as well as excellent 
communication 
skills. I understand 
the fragility 
of communicating 
within a governing 
body. 



• ■ x*e a* < 



• * «• »-. , . 



4 g Tuesday, April 12, 1 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Voter's Guide 

to the 




STUDENT 

ELECTION 



A K-State Collegian Special Section 



Watch the Collegian for candidate updates 

It has come to the attention of the Collegian that some candidates may be in jeopardy of being disqualified from the election for vio- 
lating campaign regulations. Look for more election coverage in your daily source for news, the Kansas State Collegian. 

Candidate updates as of press time are as follows: 

Candidates who have withdrawn from the election: 

ROB RAWLINGS, candidate for arts and sciences senator 

MATT CROCKER, candidate for business administration senator 

JUSTIN WILLIAMS, candidate for business administration senator 

BRENDA HALINSKI, candidate for Graduate School senator 

NIKKA HELLMAN, candidate for one-year term on Union Governing Board 

SON IA BAITY, candidate for one-year term on Union Governing Board 

ANDREW TOMB, candidate for one-year term on Union Governing Board 

Candidates who have withdrawn from the election: 

CHRIS GINN, candidate for education senator 

SHARON MORELAND, candidate for education senator 

SHUBHAM MAHESHWARI, candidal for Graduate School senator 



1 



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K-State's new bi 
head coach. / 




APRIL 13, 1994 



KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66506 



VOLUME 99A, NUMBER 135 



Decision 
time 

LaRae Brown 

and Julia Dixon, 

both sophomores 

In animal science 

and Industry, 



other about thalr 

ballots while 

voting Tuesday 

afternoon In the 

K-Stata Union. 

Tha polls will be 

open until 

6:30 p.m 

eairreoMawm 

Cottpar 




UGB vote rescheduled 



All students' 
votes in this 
election will 
count except 
those for Union 
Governing Board 
positions. 

Those positions will be voted 
for during the presidential run-off. 

If you voted early Tuesday 
morning and were told you needed 
to revolt today because of a ballot 
error, don't bother. 

Tuesday morning, the student 
Election Committee learned that a 
candidate had been left off the 
Union Governing Board ballot, 
Tricia Nolfi, coordinator of stu- 
dent activities and services, said. 

Jameia Oswald, sophomore in 
pre-joumaJism and mass commu- 
nications, was not on the one -term 
UGB ballot when the polls opened 
at 7:30 a.m., but appeared after a 
reprinting of the ballots after about 
10:30 a.m.. Nolfi said. 

About 100-150 students were 
contacted and told they needed to 




ECTIONS 



'94 



formal grievances filed Tuesday 



re vote today, she said. 

"We took all the ballots that 
were cast and pulled those and 
asked all the people who had 
voted to come back tomorrow and 
vote," she said. 

Nolfi said the mistake was a 
misprint on the part of the 
Elections Committee. 

After another error on the UGB 
ballot was discovered, the 
Elections Committee decided 
Tuesday evening to throw out all 
votes for UGB candidates. 

Elections for all UGB candi- 
dates will be held with the presi- 
dential run-off next Tuesday and 
Wednesday. April 19 and 20. 

Clayton Wheeler, chair of the 
■ Sec VOTING Page 12 



, PPtATMUt 

■ 

Two formal grievances havt 
been filed againit the Student 
Senate Elections Committee as of 
Tuesday night 

Dayton Wheeler, chair of the 
Senate Operations Committee, 
which oversees the Election 
Committee, said Tuesday that a 
candidate for Union Governing 
Board filed a grievance after 
being left off the election ballot. 

He said an observer had earlier 
filed a grievance for the same rea- 
son. 

Jameia Oswald, aophomore in 
pre- journalism and mass commu- 
nication, did not appear as a can- 
didate for a one -term UGB seat. 

Wheeler said the grievances 
would be heard during a special 
open meeting of the Senate 
Operations Committee that will 
take place during the Student 
Senate meeting Thursday, 

The complainants asked that 
the vote for UGB members be 
recast during the presidential run- 
off. 



However, a* Wheeler is him* 
self a candidate for UGB, he said 
another chair would have to be 
appointed to hear the grievances. 

"I'm caught between a rock 
and a hard place," he said "The 
chair is supposed to be an unbi- 
ased person, so I'll jusi have to sit 
back and watch how it goes. 

"It looks as though it won't be 
too much of a mess." 

Clayton said he could not 
make the decision whether to 
have another election, but after a 
meeting of the Elections 
Committee, Ed Skoog. student 
body president, announced the 
decision to give all students a 
chance to vote for UGB in the 
presidential run-off April 19-20. 

No votes cast Tuesday or 
today for UGB members will be 
counted, Skoog said. 

Skoog said he didn't think it 
would be proper for the opera- 
tions committee to hear the griev- 
ances Thursday during Senate. 

"Senate OPS should meet in a 

■ Sec GRIEVANCES Page 7 



Weather doesn't deter start 
of '94 International Week 



International 

week has 
iun en 



L.TAMK 



the Nation's 
Flag Parade 
on Monday. 



Qnsbjm 

Despite the threat of bad weather and rain, 
the gathering of Manhattan residents and K- 
State students to celebrate international diver- 
sity, awareness and goodwill in the commu- 
nity continued 

The Nations' Flag Parade and 1994 
International Week Opening Ceremony 
began K-State's and Manhattan's Inter- 
national Week Monday in the Union 
Courtyard. 

The parade was originally scheduled to 
begin at the International Student Center and 
end up at the Union. However, due to the 
inclement weather the parade not only ended, 
but also began and was held in the Union. 

The Nations' Flag Parade featured flags 
that represented all of the 97 countries from 
which 1 ,200 international students at K-Slate 
originated, Kouassi Kouakou, International 
Week Planning Committee chairman and 
president of the K-State International 
Coordinating Council, said. 

The 1994 International Week Opening 
Ceremony began with Manhattan area ele- 
mentary school students dressed in the tradi- 
tional dress of their parents' homelands pass- 
ing a globe to each other. 

"We passed the globe because it shows 
■ See INTERNATIONAL Page 12 



Presidential candidate 
files appeal to tribunal 



Colkgiin 

Two election appeals were Tiled 
with the Student, Tribunal Tuesday. 

Presidential candidate lared 
Adams and his running mate Janelle 
Moore appealed their disqualifica- 
tion from the election on the 
grounds that they were not notified 
of their violation. 

The candidates were disqualified 
because they violated election regu- 



lations by not filing an expenditure 
report. 

Moore said the candidates were 
gone with the speech team from 
Thursday until about I I a.m. 
Monday morning. 

Moore said the candidates were 
not notified of their violation or 
allowed to be present at a hearing 
on the violation. 

The candidates didn't find out 
■ See COMMITTEE Page 12 



Faculty Senate delays vote 
on education requirements 



TOMYiaim 



Culle|ii» 

Faculty Senate met Tuesday 
evening, but it failed to discuss the 
topic of general education due to 
time constraints. 

"All we had time to do was men- 
tion the few changes in the current 
proposal and then cable the whole 
issue until our next meeting," Bill 
Schapaugh, chair of academic 
affairs, said. 

Faculty Senate had to end its 
meeting shortly before 6 p.m. in the 



Union Big 8 Room in order for 
Mortar Board to hold its scheduled 
meeting. 

Schapaugh said time is running 
out for the Faculty Senate to be able 
to discuss this topic, and it will have 
to meet before its scheduled May 
meeting to answer questions about 
the issue. 

"This whole thing is different to 

any educational approach that we 

have done and must be carefully 

discussed before it can pass," 

■ See PROPOSAL Page 1 2 



In Our Opinion 

8y the Collegian Editorial Board 

Election botched; 
new one in order 



We need a new student 
election, and we need it 
now. 

The future of K-State is 
on the line because the 
Election Committee has put 
every K-State voter on a 
tightrope. 

In this case, jumping off 
and starting over is the best 
course of action. 

Since the beginning, 
problems in the manage- 
ment of this election have 
come to the attention of the 
Collegian. 

Student government is 
given too much power at 
this University for people 
to handle the election in 
such a slipshod manner. 

The Election Committee 
has made some monumen- 
tal mistakes, and the only 
way to rectify those mis- 
takes is to call for another 
election and impeach mem- 
bers of the Grievance and 
Election Committees. 

Both committees were 
formed to regulate the elec- 
tions and ensure fair treat- 
ment of candidates. Their 
actions throughout this 
election have proven that 
fairness is impossible. 

Confusion and the appar- 
ent apathy of Election 
Committee members reigns 
supreme. 

Their misinformation 
and inconsistency in deal- 
ing with candidates is 
astounding. 

The very people who 



were supposed to be the 
most informed of campaign 
regulations were in the 
dark, That ignorance has 
cost the students of K-State 
a fair election. 

It might not have been so 
bad if candidates had a 
place to take complaints 
concerning the Election 
Committee, but it's hard to 
do that when four of the 
members of the Grievance 
Committee are also on the 
Election Committee — 
including Shanta Bailey, 
who chairs both commit- 
tees. 

There is only one way to 
ensure that students have 
the opportunity to choose 
the best candidates, and that 
is to scrap the election and 
start over. 

No one on either election 
committee deserves to be 
involved in future student 
elections — especially not 
if one takes place next 
week. 

The ineptness of these 
committee members has 
cost the students of K-State 
money, time and a fair elec- 
tion. 

The violations of the 
Election Committee are 
listed below. 

The quantity and serious- 
ness of the violations prove 
that to validate the results 
of Tuesday and today 
would be a gross injustice. 

We must make it right. 
We need a new election. 



ELECTION VIOLATIONS LIST 

>• Violation ol Kansas Open Meetings art on Thursday, April 7. by the Grievance 
Committee I 

> Failure to provide bus process by the Election and Grievance commiDMS 
These committees <W not let 10 people plead the* cases at heelings lor expenditure 

report violators. 

> Discrepancy In the campaign regulations 

Expenditure regulations state thai candidates are automatically dismissed for not 
turning in expenditure reports. The campaign regulations say candidates in violation may 
be dismissed pending a hearing. | 

>• Failure to be esttedtor* 

The Electa Cc^mrltee (raited to de^ 
m Item not having enough time before the ekcfato^peQfadwMHtKdm* 
lor due process 

> Lack ol consistency In dealing with campaign violations 

Some candidates who turned in late expenditure reports were allowed to stay on the 
ballots. Others were taken off and allowed to run as write-in candidates, and others were 
disqualified. I 

> FaUurt to publish a*cncmrto^»a(k« arid 9lsos*iss 
The cans^regulasom state me EledOT 

the rules of the election are pubisned in toeCotepjan one week belore ihe atocbon. 
>■ Jameia Oswald, Union Governing Board candidate, was omitted from the ballot. 

> Vlolatton ol students' righto to ■ stent baft* 
Wwn the Section Ckmmttoe n»i^ 

at the people nho voted on rcoroct betas and bid torn cwte agar tcrtay 

> Misinformation 

An employee at the SGA office told James Wilroy, arts and sciences senator candidate, 
the wrong due date for expenditure reports. He was taken off the ballot for hung he report 
late. 

The Election Committee tow the Collegian only people who have filed expenditure 
reports can run as write-in candidates, but the SGA by-laws stale anyone can tun as a 
write-in candidate 

> sVhom to call H you wish to wtet your opinion 
Office of StuttortActMttos and Services 
S3M541 
ask tor 

Trtcis Noll - daactor ol student scbvioBS ant) services 
MHawaon-StuoarrtGc^erningAssccJatiOT 
Erin Msfisuf-SmBTi - stodsnt Inbunal chsncelor 




SourM; 



Col«9ltn rtsll rsporti 






CORRECTION. 



Because of a designer's error, the following candidates for Senate 
were incorrectly listed in Tuesday's Voter's Guide as having withdrawn 
from the election. Chris Ginn and Sharon Moreland. candidates for the 
College of Education, and Shubham Maheshwari. candidate for the 
Graduate School, have filed as write-in candidates The Collegian 
regrets the error. 



O W—Jn— day. April 13, 1—4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



©National News 



by the Associated Press 



► CMffOmiAnillWAYRE-OKNSEARUERTHANHOKO ►RUSSIA NOT READY 



LOS ANGELES — Evan the traf- 
fic jams looked sweet Tuesday on 

the Santa Monica Freeway as com- 
mute ra on the world 'a busiest free- 
way waved front their windows, and 
I the quake- sev- 



flepairs ware finished 12 weeks 
altar (he Jan. 17 quake, earning the 
contractor S1 5 million In early com- 
pletion bonuses. It's money that 
commuter Faisal Rooie said ha con- 
siders well spent 

"It's excellent. I think it was worth 
ft,' said Roole, whose 15-mlla trip 
from coastal Santa Monica to down- 
town Lot Anoeles waa trimmed to 20 
minutes from the 45 it had taken 
using city street detours 



■l think it's realty neat. I'm tired of 
getting off over there and going 
around,* Linda Sanchez said at aha 
turned onto the freeway, the west- 
ernmost section of cross-country 
Interstate 10. 

The freeway was to have 
reopened Tuesday morning, but offi- 
cials allowed traffic onto it lata 
Monday — Just in time for Gov. Past 
Wilton, who la running for re-elec- 
tion, to make the 1 1 p.m. news. 

Transportation Secretary 
Federlco Pens, Wilton and Mayor 
Richard Rlordan cleared away 
orange -colored cones, and six 
California Highway Patrol motorcycle 
officers led the first group of 
motorists across the rebuilt spans. 



► WOMAN WAKES AFTER SURGERY COVERED WITH AHTS 



WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — 
Marlon Bernhardt woke up after 
intestinal surgery to find her bed 



She said the hospital hat an 
exterminator who comet in regularly 
and "We've never had true problem 



"So they uncovered me and 
looked, and here I'm full of ants — I 
mean, full of them, over the 
abdomen ... up and down the legs, 
across the stomach, on the side," 
aha said. "I nearly went crazy." 

Wellington Regional Medical 
Center acknowledged Tuesday thai 
Bernhardt waa bitten two weeks ago, 
but noted that firs antt abound in 
subtropical South Florida. 

"We all live on anthills,' hospital 
official Chen/I Mendelsohn said. 



'Obviously, her care waa our 
Immediate concern, and the waa 
treated immediately for the ante.' 

Bernhardt 's stay wasn't extended 
because of the Incident, she said. 

Bernhardt, 77, said Monday from 
her suburban Wast Palm Beach 
home that she still has watts and 
wakes up some nights screaming 
from Uve memory. 

Fire ant bites can leave large red 
welts on the skin that may last (or 



► JAPAN URGED TO SUSPEND MILLIONS IN LOANS TO IRAN 

Japan lifted a nearly 18-year 
freeze on official development assis- 
tance loans to Tehran last May. II 
agreed to extend $375 minion at the 



TOKYO — The United States has 
urged Japan to suspend government 
loans to Iran because Iran hat sabo- 
taged Middle East paace efforts and 



sponsored terrorltm around the 

world, a newspaper said. 

The leading economic dally 
Nthon KeizaJ. quoting unnamed gov- 
ernment sources, said the Issue 
could become a topic at the July 
summit of the Group of Seven lead- 
ing industrial nations in Naples, Italy. 

Terusuke Terada, a Foreign 
Ministry spokesman, said there have 
been diplomatic discussions 
between Japan and the United 
States regarding Japan's loans to 
Iran, but he declined to disclose their 
contents. 



first of three Installments to help 
finance construction of a $2.14 Niton 
dam on the Karon River In Iran. 

Japan plans to provide a total of 
$1.46 billion for the dam, which Is 
scheduled to be completed In 2000. 

A U.S. State Department official, 
speaking on condition of anonymity, 
said the administration is unhappy 
with Japan's assistance on the dam. 

The United States takes seriously 
G-7 declarations that oppose provid- 
ing assistance to countries that sup- 
port International terrorism, the offi- 
cial said. 



MOSCOW— Robert 
FiMpptni and Yaroslav 
Mogutln say they're breaking 
new ground in Russian- 

.But there 



torn ready for. 

On Tuesday, authorities 
turned down the 
men'wwwwwws application 
tor man-lags. 

The couple had arrived at 
Wedding Palace No. 4 
clutching bouquets of flowers 
and their application for a 
two-groom wedding. But they 
didn't malty expect the appli- 
cation to be accepted. 

"The mam thing Is to draw 
attention to the problems of 
homosexuals In Russia, 
protest the pontics of sexism 
and show the strength of 
Russian- American ties.' 

The couple's visit to the 
marriage authorities came a 
year after Russia lifted a 
Soviet-em law that had made 
male homosexuality a crime 
punishable by up to Ave 
I fell 



► PUSH MADE TO OPEN 



MARRAKESH, Morocco 
— U.S. Trade Representative 

Mickey Kantor pushed his 
own tough agenda for open- 
ing world markets to U.S. 
exports Tuesday at the open- 
ing of a four-day gathering to 
sign a landmark International 



Kantor held out hopes of 
a speedy solution to a U.S. 
dispute with the European 
Unton but played down 
prospects of a quick break- 
through In the row over 
Japan's trade surplus. 

Ministers from more than 
120 countries will sign an 
agreement Friday that GATT 
expects will boost the world 
economy by more than $230 
billion a year after 10 years. 
The World Bank predicts a 
boost of $274 billion. 



CORRECTIONS 



► SO* ELECTIONS MISTAKES 

In Tuesday's Page One graphic, '12 candidates dis- 
missed." only 10 candidates were listed at having 
bean taken off the Student Governing Association 
election ballot Chris Juergens and Kenny Conkfln, 
candidates for Senate representing the College of 
Architecture and Design, also were dismissed. 

The following corrections are due to a designer's 
error In Tuesday's Voter's Guide. 

tw The year and major of Charley Herbic, candidate 
for Student Senate representing the College of Aria 
and Sciences, were incorrect in Tuesday's Voter's 
Guide. He Is a Junior in psychology. 



k> The year and major of Doug Walsh, candidate tor 
~ Student Senate representing the College of 
Agriculture, were Incorrect in Tuesday's Voter's 
Guide. Ha is a sophomore in agricultural Journalism, 

w The year and major of Paul Friedrichs, candidate 
~ tor Student Senate representing the Coiege of 
Agriculture, were incorrectly listed in Tuesday's 
Voter's Guide. He It a sophomore In agricultural ecc- 



etrors and any inconve- 
the candidates, 
Association. 



The Coi teglen regrets the 
nlence they may have 
voters or the Student 



• ,;*, 



■ There will be no elections today for College of AlU sad 
Scieneei Student Council. 

■ KSU Student Foundation achouvihlp application* are avail- 
able in the Office of Student Activities and Service!. Application! 
■re due at 3 p.m. April 22 in mailbox #47 at the OSA5. 

■ Applicaiioni for Union Activities Board "Advisor of the 
YeaT ire available in (he Office of Student Activities and Services. 
The deadline for application! ii noon April 22. 

■ Af Student Council Committee application* an available in 
Water* 120. Ponition* include ag Tclefund coordinator and ttudenl 
and faculty award! chair. Application! are due to Waten 120 by 
noon April IS. 

a Administration of the mock LSAT will be from 1 1:30 a.m. lo 
5 p.m. Friday in Union 206. 

■ Intramural entry deadline for tract meet and free throw will 
be at 5 p.m. Thursday at the Recreational Service! office in the Rec 
Complex. 

■ Parkins, Service* will answer queationi and hear concern* 
from ttudenti about the change* in the parking and bicycle regula- 
tion! at 3 p.m. Thunday in the Union Big 8 Room. 



POSTMASTER'S NOTICE 

The Kansas State CoaagJen (USPS 291 m,sttuo*nlnewspa- 
per at Kansas State Unrwrsity, is published by Stwlert Publications 
Inc.. Keette HaH 103, Manhattan, Kan. 96506. The &>l«o^ it pub- 
lished weekdays during the school year and ones a weak through 
the summer. Second class postage « pajrj at Manhattan. Kan. 
66502. 

POSTMASTER Send address changes to Kansas State 
Cotooan, circulation desk, KerJM 103, 
Manhattan. Kan 66506-7167. 



iissna.fi 

■ Oerman Table will meet at 1 1:30 a.m. in Union Stateroom I. 

■ K-State Aikido Cub will meet from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at 1 108 
Laramie St. 

■ Somen Latino* Sin Barren* will meet at 6 p.m. in Union 204. 

■ KSU Women'* Lacrosse will meet at 4 p.m. at Memorial 
Stadium. No experience is needed to join. Call Mary at 587-4157 
for mote information 

■ Native American Student Body will meet at 6: 13 p.m. ia 
Union 202. 

■ Or. Raymon Donahue, of the Department of Plant Biology at 
the University of Illinoii-Urbana, will present "Impact of Enhanced 
UV-B Irradiation on Ptiotosyntheii* and Growth of Pea and 
Cucumber" at 4 p.m. in Acken 221. 

■ Career and Employment Service! will conduct a resume-cri- 
tique session at 3:30 p.m. in Holtt 107B. 

■ International Coordinating Council will preient the 
International Fashion Show at 1 1:30 a.m. in the Union Courtyard a* 
part of International Week. 

■ Maj. Gen. Jcaue Rob lei will present "Multicultural iim." a lec- 
ture, st 9:30 a.m. in Union Forum Hall •> part of International 
Week. 




YESTERDAY'S HIQHS AND LOWS 





•smr %° 9 . 



CITY 



WICHITA* COfTFTTVIlf 



TULSA 

•e/42 




Warming across the state. Later 
in the week, a chance for 
showers and thunderstorms in 
the east. 



Warmer and mostly 
sunny. High in the 
mid 70s to lower 
80s. 



TOMORROW 



Chance for rain with 
highs In the 50s to 
60s. 



You may even get paid 
reading it. 



After all, this book from 



MasterCard offers lots of useful tips on finding a real 



job, and it's written for students by students. To order 
your copy for $9.95, call 1-800-JOB-8894. MasterCard. 
It's more than a credit card. It's smart money; ^j^ 




e •— -■■ — - ail — " i ii i 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Shaba Ignatius, 

graduate student 

In anatomy and 

physiology, has 

earned several 

research awards 

for her work In 

neu ro I m m unoon- 

docrinology. 





student grosses 4 years in research 



"People have 
believed for 
ages that 
there is a 
connection 
between the 
brain and the 
Immune 
system." 

Sheba Ignatius 

Graduate student 
In physiology 



Colkgiui 

Imagine being a 28- 
year-old graduate 
student with four 
awards under your 
belt for your research. 

Sound incredible? 

No, this is not something from 
Ripley's Believe ll Or Not. It's the 
true story of a woman at K- State. 

Sheba Ignatius is a graduate stu- 
dent in physiology who is working 
towards her doctorate degree. She 
also teaches Gross Anatomy II. 

She already has a degree in vet- 
erinary medicine from Madras 
Veterinary College in India and a 
master's degree in biochemistry 
from K-Slate. 

Ignatius' research is centered on 
anatomy and physiology, and she 
is studying the mind and body con- 
ncction, which is a new and emerg- 
ing field, she said. 



Its formal term is neuroimmu- 
noendocrinology. 

"People have believed for ages 
that there is a connection between 
the brain and the immune system. 

"The recovery of a person from 
a serious illness depends on his or 
her state of mind." she said. 

Her studies focus on the central 
nervous system, which controls 
many bodily functions — sleeping, 
the heart and growth. 

She also studies the endocrine 
system, which secretes hormones, 
and the immune system. 

The immune system produces 
molecules called cytokines, and 
these are believed to act on the 
brain and the endocrine system to 
produce fever, drowsiness and a 
loss of appetite when someone is 
sick, she said. 

"We have known that the cen- 
tral nervous system controls the 
endocrine system and that the 
endocrine system controls the cen- 
tral nervous system. 

"We wanted to know the con- 



nection between the cytokines and 
the central nervous system," 
Ignatius said. 

Two examples of cytokines are 
interleukins and tumor necrosis 
factors. 

Ignatius won three awards for 
her research on interleukins. 

"We wanted to know the 
changes produced by the cytokines 
in the brain, especially the neuro- 
transmitters in the hypothalamus," 
she said. 

The hypothalamus is a small 
part of the brain, and they found 
increased conccn stations of neuro- 
transmitters, or brain signal mole- 
cules, in this area, she said. 

Ignatius gave injections of inter- 
leukin to male rats and discovered 
changes in the activity of specific 
neurotransmitters in fottr hypothal- 
amic nuclei. 

"That's what I got the awards 
for." she .said 

The research that she did, along 
with Dr. PS. Kumar and Dr S.K. 
Quadri, professors in the College 



of Veterinary Medicine, took about 
a month and a half. 

Results from her study showed 
cytokines act on a small part of the 
the hypothalamus and bring about 
changes in neurotransmitters. 
Ignatius said. 

All this research has received 
recognition from honorary soci- 
eties both in and out of K-State. 

The Phi Zeta, a society within 
the veterinary college, rewarded 
Ignatius with the first-place Phi 
Zeta award for basic research. 

From the American 
Physiological Society, she received 
both the Carolin turn Suden award 
and the Antonie Van Harreveld 
award for the central nervous sys- 
tem section of the APS. 

"The Van Harreveld award was 
established in 1989 to honor a dis- 
tinguished neu ro scientist who set 
an inspiring example for his stu- 
dents and colleagues," Celts 
Sladek. professor of physiology at 
the Chicago Medical School, said 
in a letter to Ignatius. 



Wednesday, A pril 1*. 1—4 Q 

Rwandan 
capital a 
city in arms 



KIGALI, Rwanda — Amid the crash of mor- 
tar fire, French and Belgian paratroopers evacu- 
ated the last large group of foreign refugees 
Tuesday as a major rebel force began pushing 
into Kigali from the north. 

With the advance of the rebels, mostly mem- 
bers of the minority Tutsi tribe, the capital was 
extremely tense. 

A trip through the outskirts gave the impres- 
sion of an entire city at arms. 

The roads were lined with Hutu men, some 
dressed in new winter coats apparently looted 
from stores, others barefoot and armed with 
clubs, machetes, axes and makeshift spears and 
bows and arrows. 

"They are afraid of the rebels, and I don't 
blame them," said Guy Steimcs, a Belgian busi- 
nessman. 

"The rebels call themselves the Rwandan 
Patriotic Front, but they'll probably start killing 
Hutus, just like the presidential guard killed 
Tuts is." 

The re bet -con trolled Radio Muhabura, moni- 
tored by the British Broadcasting Corp., said 
rebel forces had taken control of two towns in 
northern Rwanda after inflicting heavy casualties 
on government troops. The report could not be 
immediately confirmed. 

More than 100,000 refugees streamed out of 
Kigali toward neighboring Burundi on Tuesday 
to escape the advancing rebel forces, and more 
than 1 ,000 foreigners were evacuated from the 
capital. 

■ Tw e nty thousand Rwandan* killed In week 



An estimated 20,000 people have been slain 
in a week of violence, almost all of them 
Rwandan s. 

Ten Belgian soldiers taking part in a U.N. 
peacekeeping operation died on the first day of 
fighting, which was set off by a plane crash 
Wednesday at Kigali's airport that killed the 
presidents of Rwanda and Burundi. Six Belgian 
civilians and at least three French also have been 
killed. 

But the real dispute is decades-long, reflect- 
ing the enmity between Hutus who dominate the 
government and comprise 90 percent of the 
country's 8.5 million people, and Tutsis, who 
make up 9 percent of the population 

Two rebel battalions of about 500 men each 
pushed into Kigali late Tuesday, nearly sur- 
rounding the airport. 

One group moved east and south of the air- 
port, as the other tried to cut off the main road 
running west from the airport to the city. They 
hadn't succeeded by nightfall, said Col. Marc 
Emonts-Gast, a Belgian military spokesman. 



mm coping with Yoraomvmm 

You have just been told that you have an STD or that you are HIV+ . . . initial 
numbness is transformed into a swirl of emotions. What might you feel? What 
can you do to cope? Some common emotional reactions are listed below with 
corresponding suggestions for coping with each. 



MOVE FROM COMMON 
EMOTIONAL REACTIONS 



MOVE TO 
MORE EFFECTIVE COPING 



DENIAL: You may try to ignore the impact of 
your own behaviors. For example, people 
under the influence of alcohol or drugs may 
make irresponsible choices in partners and 
sexual practices; they don't always remember 
to put on a condom properly if at all. Or, it 
may be taking a "Why Worry/" attitude or 
believing that it can't happen to you, that 
you're invincible. 

SHAME...CUILT... ANGER: Based on your 
own or society's biases, you may feel shame 
or even blame for having an STD or being 
HIV+. Feelings of guilt or anger may fill you 
whether it is realistic or not. 

FEAR... LOSS: You may fear the long-term 
effects of the illness which may include 
issues of loss such as the loss of friends, loss 
of fertility or impact on childbearing, loss of 
self-image/or even loss of your life when 
AIDS is involved. 

WORRY: You may go around in circles in 
your mind about: What do I say to my 
partner? Should I telt anyone? When will the 
next flare-up come? The thoughts may come 
and go, or they may seem endless... 

ISOLATION/AVOIDANCE: Initially you may 
be unable or unwilling to talk to parents or 
friends about STDSMIDS. You may avoid 
dating or close relationships or even any 
social situations. 



ACCEPTANCE: Understand the fact that 
alcohol impairs judgment and common 
sense. If you drink, don't make any foolish or 
impulsive decisions that could affect the rest 
of your life. It CAN happen to you. By the 
year 2000 as many as 1 1 million people 
will be affected with HIV, not to mention 
other STDs. Become knowledgeable; learn as 
much as you can about these diseases. 

GET FACTS to confront the stigma; join a 
support group to learn you are not alone; 
accept that this is a health issue, not a moral 
issue; direct your anger to take action for 
change, not harm. 

TAKE STEPS: No one should face a difficult 
situation alone because loneliness increases 
the fear. Don't wait until a crisis to 
talk/interact with supportive peers or family, 
build on positives in relationships. It is all 
right to get counseling for help in coping, 

FOCUS ON FACTS/REALITIES rather than 
the fears. Try writing down your thoughts/ 
worries: this may make them easier to focus 
on one at a time; develop objective plans for 
self; develop stress-management skills; seek 
help. 

f 

REACH OUT: talk to a trusted friend or 
family member, seek change in current social 
patterns, develop new friends or social 
network, develop or strengthen relationship 
skills. 



QUESTIONS? NEED HELP? CONTACT: 
Lafene Student Health at 532-6544 
University Counseling Services at 532-6927. 
Riley County Health Dept. at 776-4779. 








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PINION 








In Our Opinion 



By the Collegian Editorial Board 



Election '94 — end the farce now 



•(•effort 
eommflttM 
members, irv 
th« only way to 

giva> th« 
students • fair 
election. 



There is only one way to guarantee a 
fair Student Senate election now. 

Throw the bums out. 

The Student Senate Grievance and 
Election committees have had adequate 
time to prove their ineptitude at running a 
fair election. 

The committees have violated open- 
meetings laws, denied students due 
process and delayed expenditure-report 
reviews all before a stogie ballot was cast 
in the elections. 

But the mistakes have not ceased since 
the voting began. 

On Tuesday, the first day of the elec- 
tion, election workers realized, about three 
hours after the polls opened and between 
100 and 150 people had voted, that a can- 
didate for Union Governing Board had 
been left off the ballot. The Election 
Committee said it tried to rectify the error 
by calling all who had voted and asking 
them to revote today. 

In requesting revotes, the Election 
Committee violated Senate by-laws guar- 
anteeing students the right to secret-ballot 
voting, as well as denying candidates a 
fair election. 

Not only that, but Tuesday's ballot 
neglected to mention there were four posi- 
tions open for UGB's one-year term. 
Instead, the ballot said there was only one 
position. As a result, the Election 
Committee postponed voting for UGB 



positions until next week's presidential 
runoff. 

Wait — there's more: If candidates 
want to file grievances regarding the 
Election Committee, they will be taking 
those concerns to the Grievance 
Committee, all but one of whose members 
are on the Election Committee. And 
Shanta Bailey is chair of both committees, 

Can we say "conflict of interest"? 

Senate made a step in the right direction 
when it passed legislation earlier this 
semester to make the two committees sep- 
arate. Where senators went wrong was in 
deciding to allow members of one com- 
mittee to serve on the other — clearly a 
conflict of interest. 

We can no longer allow the future of K- 
State's student government to rest ia the 
hands of people who can't figure out two- 
thirds of five, which is exactly what hap- 
pened when the Election Committee tried 
to determine a two-thirds majority to kick 
a candidate out of the election Friday. 

If we are to avoid another election dis- 
aster this year. Student Senate must imme- 
diately impeach Bailey and all other mem- 
bers of the Election and Grievance com- 
mittees. These committee members need 
to replaced by people who are not mem- 
bers of the other committee. 

Bailey and her committees have made a 
sham of the election. 

Let's end the farce now. 



MARLETT' S WORLD 



Life is worth the fight — 
there's always a solution 



"It's better to burn out than to fade 
away." 

—Neil Young 

Thai's a bunch of crap. As much as I 
like Neil Young, thai has to be the stupid- 
est thing I have ever heard. 

Well, next to all the people who are 
supposedly calling in to radio stations to 
say that now Kurt Cobain is dead, they 
feel like killing themselves, too. 

One guy in Maple Valley, Wash., did. 

Come on, people, you're smarter than 
thai! 

I'm sorry he's dead. I truly am. It's a 
loss to everyone who enjoyed Nirvana's 
music. It's a loss to his wife and to his 1- 
y ear-old daughter. 

Especially his daughter, Frances Bean. 

But to kill yourself — to cop out like 
that — is reprehensible. 

No matter what the note said, no mat- 
ter what he told everyone, it can never 
explain why he felt it necessary to put a 
shotgun in his mouth and pull the trigger. 

I understand depression. You bet your 
boots I do. I've been on medication for it. 
I've been hospitalized for it. At one point, 
1 considered suicide. 

But it got better. All things do. 

Especially after I discovered I had 
been misdiagnosed and given medication 
for a condition I didn't have. 

Especially after I found out I'm hypo- 
glycemic. To the layman, this means that 
when 1 went to the doctor for symptoms 
of depression, they sent me to the mental 
health clinic instead of seeing if perhaps 




the reason I was depressed was due to 
dietary reasons. 

Like my sugar intake was way, way 
out of whack. 

When I finally 
did get my blood 
sugar checked, it 
was 40, and I had 
just drunk a Pepsi. 

The lowest 
normal level is 70. 

The first doctor 
I saw didn't say 
anything was 
wrong. 

The point of 
all my medical 
history is this: 

I kept trying. 
Something was 
wrong, and I 
knew it. I felt like 
shit — that I knew. It wasn't getting any 
better. That I knew, also. 

I also knew it wasn't supposed to be 
this way. There had to be something I 
could do. 

There is always something you can do. 

Always, 

Life is a fight. Don't lei anyone kid 
you. It's not easy, but it's worth living. 

When people like Kurt Cobain commit 
suicide, people have a tendency to make 
them folk heroes or something. 

He's even been called the John 
Lennon of our generation. 

I have news for everyone. John 
Lennon didn't kill himself. He was mur 



LOLA 

Shrimplin 



dered. 

We can sit and talk about how every- 
thing has been dumped on our generation 
and, oh. we have it so bad. No one's had 
it this bad before. 

We can talk about how Kurt couldn't 
stand the pressure of being in this gene ra- 
tion. His song lyrics, (if you could under- 
stand them) said as much. 

We can shout "See! See what you did 
to us? It's too hard! We can't handle it." 

We could all go out and kill ourselves 
to prove just how much pain our genera- 
tion is in. 

We could go down as the generation 
that was too weak for survival. 

It's become easier to be the victim 
than to fight and say "I'm not giving up. 
dammit!" 

It's so much easier to say there's noth- 
ing you can do. that everyone and every- 
thing is stacked against you. It's hard liv- 
ing this life. I won't say it's easy. 

But before anyone goes out to commit 
suicide, I want them to think of one thing. 

Think of the people you're leaving 
behind. 

Think of the unending pain they will 
have to live with. It won't be relief to be 
rid of you. like you might think. 

It never is. 

Ii will be the unending questions about 
what they could have done to prevent 
your death. 

How they caused it. What they didn't 
hear. Why they didn't listen. 

And no note ever written can take the 
pain away. No letter ever written can ever 
explain why you felt it necessary to dev- 
astate the ones who love you. 

In the end, suicide isn't about you. 

Il's about (hose you leave behind. 

Lola Shrimplin it a manlor In political 

science. 




Christianity relies on 
historical evidence 



I have been called, among other 
things, a religious writer. Yet, 
my goal for this column and 
every other column in which I use 
words you can't say in public 
schools — Including Jesus Christ, 
God and Holy Spirit — is not to 
defend religion but to present 
Christ. 

Religion is for the believer and non- 
believer one of the greatest obstacles to 
understanding Christ. Encyclopedias often 
define Christ as the founder of Christianity. 
But Christ did not come to start a new reli- 
gion, he came "so that we may have life 
and have it abundantly." (John 10:10) In 
fact, the people he was most critical of 
were religious leaders. 

Men found Christianity more or less 
around Christ. For 2,000 years, Christians 
have established institutions, formed orga- 
nizations, postulated doctrines and split 
into denominations under the auspices of 
the Christian religion. 

Religion is man reaching toward God. 
Christ is God reaching toward man. So 
often Christ is lost in the Christianity. 
Religion divides while Christ unites. 

Non-believers, on the other hand, often 
justify rejecting Christ on the basis of con- 
clusions drawn from a general and vague 
understanding of religion. One reader 
recently wrote, "A truly religious person 
should realize historical details are irrele- 
vant, and one whose belief lies on proving 
details correct is missing the point of reli- 
gion entirely. A truly religious person 
should realize that religious beliefs don't 
rely on evidence." 

This claim makes two errors. First, not 
all religions are the same; so there can be 
no universal "point of religion." Second, 
the Christian religion, which is centered on 
the person Christ, is historically based, and 
its claims do rely on evidence. 

The belief in Christ stands or falls with 
the reality of the event of Christ's resurrec- 
tion, Christ is falsifiable. If Christ died and 
did not rise, he is not the Messiah because 
a dead Messiah is no Messiah. Therefore, 
following Christ would be foolish and sim- 
ply wrong. 




JOHN 

Hart 



Christ said he was God (John 14:9, John 
5:17-18) and claimed the ability to forgive 
sins, something 
only God can do 
(Marie 2:5-7, Isaiah 
43:25). 

Determining the 
credibility of these 
claims is not a mat- 
ter of finding 
absolute proof or 
using certain rea- 
soning; rather it 
involves probabilis- 
tic or inductive rea- 
soning, which 
relies on making a 
case based on evi- 
dence. 

The case for 
believing Christ's claims essentially con- 
sists of the following: The historical record 
of Christ is reliable. No statement in the 
Gospels has been shown to be historically 
inaccurate. 

The earliest Gospel manuscripts schol- 
ars have access to were written at most 200 
years after the event. Compare this with 
other documents historians consider to be 
reliable, including works by Josephus, 
Thucydides and Herodotus, which date to 
between 1,000 and 1,450 years after the 
events. 

The circumstances surrounding Christ's 
burial, as described in historically accurate 
texts, would have made it impossible for 
his body to be stolen or for the not-quite- 
dead crucified Christ, who was also pierced 
through the side by expert executioners, to 
overpower the Roman guards and escape a 
sealed tomb. The most reasonable explana- 
tion is that he rose from the dead as he pre- 
dicted himself (John 2: 19.21). 

The evidence supporting Christ is exten- 
sive. Following Christ does not require a 
blind faith that ignores reason (John 20:30- 
31). The claims of Christ are either true or 
false. If they're false, Christ is either a liar 
or lunatic, options few scholars take seri- 
ously. If his claims are true, Christ is who 
he says he is: Lord and savior. 

Different people make different claims 
about Christ. The issue is: which case is the 
most compelling? 

John Hart la a Junior In political adanc*. 




► ILECTIONS 



Candidates treated unfairly 
by Grievance Committee 

Dear Editor, 

1 am writing a letter in response to the 
article concerning the Grievance 
Committee hearings Monday night. 

I would like to express my deepest sor- 
rows to the candidates who were disquali- 
fied for not submitting their expenditure 
reports by 5 p.m. April 8, as well as those 
who returned the reports to the committer 
late bui whose names were erased from 
the voting roster, 

The committee chose to accept the 
expenditure reports of the two candidates 
who filed prior to Sunday night. Sunday 
night! 

The deadline, explicidy written in the 
election guidelines, states that it is by 5 



p.m., Friday, April 8. 

But since the committee did not review 
the reports until Sunday night, they made 
the decision to allow those two candidates 
to be on the ballot. 

On the other hand, there were three 
candidates who filed on Monday, but have 
been reduced to write-in candidates. 

Late is late, regardless if it is 25 min- 
utes or two days. 

It seems either some members of the 
committee have not read the guidelines set 
before them or they are not taking the 
essential effort imperative for the student 
elections to run fairly. 

I urge students who feel they can fol- 
low the election guidelines better and do a 
consistent job to consider applying and to 
work for change. That could be about any- 
one. 

Tara Foster 

junior/political science 



► COVERAGE 



Collegian deserves attention 
for messing up, too 

Dear Editor, 

When I opened the April 12 issue of 
the Collegian. 1 was shocked to find that 
the picture that I had taken of me in the 
Office of Student Activities and Services 
was not next to my picture in the election 
section of the paper. 

All of the people who had not shown 
up to get their pictures taken had that cute 
little message placed in their box so peo- 
ple would know that they are irresponsible 
and do not manage their time well. 

I would have liked to see the opposite 
happen to those of us with nothing in our 
boxes. I would really have appreciated il 
if ourhoxes had read, "Candidate was pre- 
sent n the photo session. We screwed up 



his picture, and it is in no way his fault." 

You see, you told us when someone 
else messed up, but not when you did. 

J a red Becker 
freshman/pre- medicine 

► ABOHTIOW 

Right to Life table offensive 
to victims of Holocaust 

Dear Editor, 

On Saturday afternoon, I found myself 
wandering through the maze of tables at 
Open House in the K-State Union. 

The Students for the Right to Lire had 
a monitor at the table that rotated through 
a series of facts and figures. 

One screen was a cartoon of a rlitler- 
esque man decked out in Nazi regalia, 
swastikas and all. The caption read some- 



thing like, "1,500,000 (abortions per- 
formed) a year? 1 was a lightweight." 

The point of this letter is not the abor- 
tion debate. Arguments for both sides are 
well known and well worn. 

The point is that this cartoon is a slap 
in the face to the millions of people — 
Jews, gypsies, homosexuals, the elderly 
and disabled — who were murdered 
under the Nazi regime. 

In effect, it trivializes their suffering 
and sends the message that their deaths 
mean little compared to abortion. 

I feel such tactics are inappropriate. 
Numerical figures are informative, and 1 
do not have a problem with them when 
presented in a straight-forward manner. 

However, il bothers me greatly to see a 
serious subject (reared with such flippan- 
cy. 

Lauren Mark ley 
senlor/musk and anthropology 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



W»dn«d « y, April 13. 1tt»4 ■ 




Finney: No cards for beer 



TOPEKA — Kansans might not 
get a chance to use their credit cards 
to buy liquor on Sundays after Gov, 
Joan Finney said Tuesday she 
would veto a bill that would allow 
both. 

Finney has on her desk a bill that 
would both permit Sunday sales and 
credit card purchases of liquor. 

"I will veto it because of the 
credit provision." Finney said. "I 
don't believe you should buy liquor 
on credit I believe that is bad poli- 
cy," 

She did not object to the Sunday 
sales provisions. 

Presently, people cannot buy 
packaged liquor or beer with a cred- 
it card. But diners who drink liquor 
with their meals in a restaurant can 
pay for their drinks with plastic. 

Finney said that is different from 
buying beer or liquor on credit at a 
liquor store. 

Some retail liquor store owners 



oppose Sunday sales. However, the 
convenience store owners in 
Kansas, who sell 3.2 beer, have 
been pushing for the bill for years. 

"All the convenience stores were 
united in their effort to get Sunday 
sates," Pete McGill. a lobbyist for 
Coastal Corp., said. 

"We have never asked the 
Legislature to be open on Sunday," 
Pat Oppitz, president of the Kansas 
Retail Liquor Dealers Association, 
said. "We have retailers who have 
told me they don't want to open on 
Sunday," 

The credit card provision was 
sought by a winery that did a lot of 
tourist business, Oppitz said. 

"If you're doing any tourist busi- 
ness at all, it'll bring in more 
money." Oppitz said. 

However, she said a lot of small 
retail liquor stores cannot afford to 
accept credit cards. 

The bill would permit beer and 
liquor sales on Sunday on a county- 
option basis. 



Bushnell home to herbarium 



Collegian 

Walking into a spacious room in 
Bushnell Hall with high ceilings 
and rows and rows of gray metal 
cabinets, some people might won- 
der where they are. 

After opening one of the cabinets 
and examining numerous manila 
folders, the place could still remain 
a mystery. 

What this place actually is, is the 
K- State herbarium, one of the oldest 
entities in the Kansas Agricultural 
Experiment Station. 

"Most people have never heard 
the word herbarium before and 
don't, know what in the world it is," 
Ted Barkley,, professor of biology 
andittrbarium curator, said. 

An herftarium is a collection of 
dried, pressed plants attached to 
sheets of paper with labels giving 
the plant name, collection number, 
date and place of collection and the 
collector's name, he said. 

After the sheets are labeled, they 
are placed in folders. These folders 
are stored in groups according to 



geographic area and the plant's 
family. 

"Herbariums are used as research 
and learning centers for plant-sci- 
ence studies and related agricultural 
programs," Barkley said. "And all 
institutions with botany have them 
because it's like a library, only for 
plants." 

Established in 1871 and located 
on the top floor of Bushnell Hall, 
the herbarium at K-State was started 
by students and faculty who wanted 
to store plants they collected by 
manual labor. 

"Professors and students would 
lake these wooden tubs with wobbly 
wheels attached to them and cart 
them around the countryside in 
search of plants," Barkley said. 

Presently, the K-Statc herbarium 
has about 185,000 plants and about 
2,000 seeds and is broken down into 
two main parts. 

One part is the research program, 
which is supported by the Kansas 
Experiment Station, and the other is 
the plant identification service, 
which is supported by the County 
Cooperative Extension Agency. 



"We provide free plant identifi- 
cation to Kansas residents, and we 
get about 100 plants a year for iden- 
tification," Barkley said. 

People want plants identified 
because either they suspect it is a 
weed or that it is important to culti- 
vation, he said. If it is a weed, the 
proper control information can be 
passed on to the individual. 

Besides being a part of the 
research and plant identification 
programs, individuals at the herbari- 
um also work on their own projects. 

"I'm involved in a group projects 
of putting together and publishing a 
set of books dealing with the all of 
the families or flora of North 
America," Barkley said. 

One student who works in the 
herbarium has also taken on an indi- 
vidual project. 

"I'm studying and collecting a 
group of plants that's only in 
Mexico and Central America and 
trying to find out how many differ- 
ent species there are," Bonnie 
Clark, graduate student in botany, 
said. 



Johlt Janovec, Mnior 
In horticulture, works 
In the K-State Herbarium Tuesday 
afternoon In Bushnell Hall. The 
herbarium Is a collection of dried, 
pressed plants attached to sheets 
of paper with labels giving the 
plant name, collector's name, col- 
lection number, date and place of 
collection. K-State'a oldest plant 
specimen dates back to the 



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PORTS 






RED SOX 22, ROYALS 11 

KANSASClTYMo.(AP)-Soo(iCoopirhkfortiicyciiinddnMlnflnnra l andthe 
'Boston Red Sox routed the Kansas CHy Royals 22- 11 Tuesday night in Wr highest-scoring 
game in 18 seasons. 

(t was the most runs Scored against tie Royals aft* they began play in 1969, a span of 
3,966 games. It also was the Nghesl-scoring game in the 22-year history of the batparlL 




FOOTBALL 



Tom Asbury 
dsmonmtratM ■ 
flsty attrtuds 
during 

PsppsnMns's first 
round lots to 
Michigan during 
this yMr'i NCAA 
Tournament. 
During Asbury'a 
six aeaaona with 
tha Wavss, ha tod ' 
tnsmtofiva 
post a — t on " 

toumamsnts. 







K-State Wildcats: 



Asbury new chief Cat 




opportunity 
whan you 

look at the 
proud 



tradition that 
tho program 
represents. It 
ia obvious to 
mo that tha 
paopla at 
Kansas State 
take great 
pride In their 
basketball 



Tom Asbury 

K-Stale'a new 
basketball coach 



ColkfiM 

The decision has 
been made, and 
the winner is 
Pepperdine's 
Tom Asbury. 

Asbury signed a contract with K- 
Staie on Tuesday to become the new 
head basketball coach for the Wildcats. 

Asbury is leaving the Pepperdine 
Waves to accept the position with K- 
State. The announcement ends nearly 
two weeks of speculation on the pan of 
students, players and alumni consider- 
ing the coaching replacement for Dana 
Altman. 

Asbury had coached the Waves for 
six seasons and led them to three 
NCAA Tournaments and two National 
Invitation Tournament berths. 

"Tom Asbury was targeted from the 
very beginning of our search and to me 
has the whole package," It-State 
Athletic Director Max Urick said. 

"He has outstanding communication 
skills to recruit, sell his program and 
teach the x's and o's. 

"In numerous references we 
received from his coaching peers, there 
is no doubt that he is considered one of 
the premier coaches and recruiters in 
Division 1 basketball." 

While at Pepperdine, Asbury has 
never won fewer than 17 games in a 
season and has had four 20-win sea- 
sons. 

"I'm very excited about coming to 
Kansas State University," Asbury amid. 
"It's a tremendous opportunity when 
you look at the proud heritage and tra- 
dition that the program represents. 

"It is obvious to me that the people 
at Kansas State take great pride in their 
basketball program. 

"It's certainly one of the top pro* 



grams in the country and presents a 
great opportunity for myself, my staff 
and my family," he said. 

The position with the Wildcats 
became available when former coach 
Altman resigned and accepted a posi- 
tion with Creighton the day after the 
Cats finished in fourth place in the 
NIT. 

Other coaches who were mentioned 
as potential candidates were Tulsa's 
Tubby Smith, Ohio's Larry Hunter and 
Washburn's Bob Chipman. 

Smith, who was rumored to be the 
front runner during much of the search 
for a new coach, decided to stay with 
the program at Tulsa. 

His announcement came last Friday 
during a rally for the Golden Hurricane 
team in celebration of its performance 
in the NCAA Tournament. 

Also on Tuesday, Hunter accepted a 
contract extension with Ohio. 

With both Smith and Hunter spoken 
for, Asbury became the No. 1 choice. 

"I agree with the coaches around the 
country who see Tom Asbury as one 
the top- flight coaches and recruiters in 
the nation," President Jon Wefald said. 

'Tom has great integrity and knows 
how to win friends and influence peo- 



COACHING KU 



Asbury** conference tournament ; 
post-season play has earned hln 
coaching kudos whle with Pepperdine. 
He his led the Waves to a 125-59 
mark (.679), inducing 66-16 (.786) I 
the West Coast Conference. The 
Waves have won three WCC titles 
while Asbury has coached them. 




pie. He has a lovely family, and 
Kansans and K-Staters will like him 
and identify with him." 

Led by Asbury, the Waves won the 
West Coast Conference Tournament 
and were invited to the NCAA this sea- 
son. The team pushed Michigan into 
overtime during the first round of the 
tourney before losing to the 
Wolverines. 

Also this year, Asbury was selected 
as the head coach for the West Team at 
the U.S. Olympic Festival in St. Louis. 

Asbury becomes the 19th coach in 
K-State history. 



CATS GET PEPPERDINE COACH 

Pepperdine coach Tom Asbury had a winning tenure at Pepperdine and won three 
conference titles. Here are his overall, West Coast Conference and post-season stats 
year-by-yea/. 

WCC 



.607 10-4 




iourc*: K-St*t« Sport* Information 



May's knee questionable 



ColltflMl 

K-State quaterback Chad May is 
reportedly suffering from a knee 
injury and may need surgery. 

May, who was ranked 1 8th in the 
final 1993 Coaches Poll, has been 
on crutches with his left knee ban- 
daged. 

Head athletic trainer John 
Thomas refused to comment on 



May's condition when contacted 
Tuesday night. 

"We don't give out any informa- 
tion directly. You'll need to talk to 
Sports Information." 

"I can't comment on that," 
Sports Information director Ben 
Boyle said, "I don't know what is 
up with Chad. I try not to know. 
That way, 1 can tell you (the media) 
the truth. We can't discuss injuries." 



Cats to play in double-header 
against Huskers 

Kevin Wicker, who is 0-3 with a 
6.67 earned run average, against 
right-hander Tom Bergan. who is 
2-4 with a 4.34 ERA. 

Adam Novak (0-2, 4.34) will 
go to the mound in the second 
game and faces preseason ail- 
American Troy Brohawn (1-1, 
4.50). 

Gates open at 1 1 a.m. 



CoUeiiia 

The first game between the K- 
State and the Nebraska baseball 
teams was canceled Tuesday due 
to rain. The game will be made 
up as part of a noon doublehead- 
er to be played today at Frank 
Myers Field. 

K-State will send right-hander 



COLUMN 



Orr embodies 
Cyclone Country 




NICOLE 

POELL 



I'm dreading Thursday. 

Not just because I have a 10- 
page paper and a resume due, but 
also because another one of my 
heroes may be retiring — Iowa 
State basketball coach Johnny 
,prr. 

It's not fair. First George 
Brett retires, and now Coach Orr 
is considering life on the golf 
course over a few more years in 
Hilton Coliseum. 

Now. I know I'm a Wildcat 
now, but after being an Iowa girl 
and 

Cyclone 
fan for 18 
years, it's 
hard to 
forget 
about this 
bald- 
headed, 
66-year- 
old coach 
who was 
the savior 
of Iowa 
State bas- 
ketball. 

Ott 
camc to 
Cyclone 

Country after 12 years at the 
University of Michigan. He took 
the Wolverines to six national 
tournaments and 10 winning sea- 
sons. 

Coming to Ames in 1980, 
Johnny took over a program that 
had recorded losing records in 
five of its last six seasons. Iowa 
State hadn't appeared in a post- 
season tournament in more than 
40 years and had averaged 
around 6,000 fans at every game 
before Orr arrived. 

Now, Hilton Coliseum could 
be considered "The House That 
Johnny Built," as in addition to 
making the Cyclones contenders 
again. Johnny has made Hilton 
the place to be on those cold 
Iowa nights. 

In addition to league stand- 
ings, Orr has made Cyclone bas- 
ketball a hit at the box office. 
Iowa State averages around 
12,700 fans per game. 

How did he do this? 

■ By winning ballgames, to 
■tart. Orr recorded his 200th 
career win last season and has 
taken the Cyclones to six NCAA 
Tournament appearances in the 
past nine seasons. 

While injuries hampered this 
year's young team, next year's 
Cyclone squad looks to be a Big 
Eight force. 

■ By developing a good rela- 
tionship with the students. 

On isn't the type of coach to 
distance himself from the student 
body; in fact, he loves to work 
the student section, shaking 
hands and blowing kisses before 
a game. 

He proved his devotion to the 
students a few years ago when a 



near riot broke out at Iowa 
State's annual VEISHA celebra- 
tion/aJl-campus party. 

Both he and football coach 
Jim Walden came out at 2 a.m., 
asking the students to get things 
under control. Like the^, had just 
been scolded by their father, 
thousands of students stopped 
the rioters, put the fires out and 
went home. When Johnny talks, 
people listen. 

■ By being a good PR man. 
Johnny would do almost any 
thing to promote Iowa State. My 
favorite 

Orr promo 
was when 
he and 
Walden 
dressed up 
as the two 
Bartyles & 
James 
wine cool- 
er 

guys, Ed 
and Jim. 
Johnny 

played Ed, the one who never 
talked (that was quite a stretch 
for him). They made posters, 
commercials and cardboard 
cutouts using the cooler theme, 
"And as usual, Ed and I thank 
you for your support," 

Wonder what Coach Snyder 
and Coach Asbury could do for a 
promo. I'll think about that one. 

■ By just being Johnny. One 
of my favorite Orr stories 
occurred a few years ago when 
the Cyclones were playing KU. 

My dad and I were listening 
to Qrr's postgame radio show 
when, in the middle of a ques- 
tion, Johnny yel)ed,"You little 
shits," right before going to a 
commercial. 

We found out later that some 
kids shooting around on the court 
after the game had knocked Orr's 
pop all over him during the inter- 
view. 

I can just see Johnny's bald 
head getting all flushed when 
that happened. 

With Johnny hinting at retire- 
ment Thursday, I can't help but 
feel a little sad. In a way, I can 
understand why he would go. 

His health hasn't been the 
best lately, and I have been 
afraid that he might have a heart 
attack on the court someday if a 
ref provoked him enough. 

Just watching him over the 
past year, it seems like he's just 
getting tired of it all. He doesn't 
get as fired up as he used to, and 
his assistants appear to do most 
of the heavy coaching. 

But Cyclone basketball will 
never be the same without Orr 
around, and if he goes, Cyclone 
fans will never hear these pre- 
game words again: 

"Heeeeeere's Johnny!" 

Here's to you, Johnny. Please 
don't go. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wdn— dw April 13. 1—4 7 



Students 
drink 1-1/2 
times a week 



iLT 



(Msfai 

A beer. A few shots. A margarita 
or two. 

It all might seem very harmless, 
but for those who become heavy 
drinkers, lying ahead may be a road 
of emotional pain, physical prob- 
lems and possible legal ramifica- 
tions. 

At K-State, the average student 
drinks about 1-1/2 times per week. 
Bill Arck, director of alcohol and 
substance abuse for University 
Counseling Services, said. 

"] think that's about average," 
Arck said. "I don't think that it's 
any more or less than any other 
Midwestern university." 

The problem for students arises 
in the amount of liquor that is con- 
sumed in the 1-1/2 times they drink 
each week, he said. 

"Episodic problem drinking hap- 
pens when people drink too much 
and binge. They get drunk," Arck 




iMonyra* 

■ftS Of 53T-* 
I Pwnee Mental Haelfi Center. 

567-4372 

I University Counseing Servicac 

53249G7 



Episodic problem drinking, for 
students, usually occurs on week- 
ends. Often, the drinker will pass 
out, have a memory lapse or exer- 
cise poor judgment such as drinking 
and driving or having unwanted 
sex, he said. 

Brenda Hanger, a Manhattan 
licensed clinical social worker, said 
there are several reasons why col- 
lege students drink. 

"Alcoholism and alcohol abuse 
usually seems to part of a bigger 
problem," Hanger said. 

These* problems may include 
anxiety about being away from 
home for the first time, parents' 
divorce and the pressures of grow- 
ing up, she said. 

"College is a pressure time," 
Hanger said. "Alcohol is an escape 
from the pressures and their prob- 
lems." 

Many students drink with the 
sole purpose of getting drunk, she 
said. 

Besides the obvious mental and 
emotional turmoil of heavy drink- 
ing and alcoholism, there are also 
dangerous physical effects. Hanger 
said 

"People most commonly refer to 
liver damage as the big physical 
problems from alcohol, but there 
are several other problems, too," 
she said. 

Drinking can lead to esophagus 
problems caused by frequent vomit- 
ing, heart and lung stress, and kid- 
ney problems caused by alcohol 
usage and abuse. 

Some forms of cancer, such as 
liver cancer, have been linked to 
drinking. 

There are some clues to look for 
when trying to determine whether a 
person is an alcoholic. 

"One of the first clues is when 
you can drink more than your 
friends and not have it affect you in 
the same way," Hanger said. 

Other indicators may include 
memory loss or blackouts caused 
by drinking, finding more creative 
ways to get money to purchase 
alcohol, mood swings, odd behav- 
ior, distancing from friends, relying 
on alcohol to relieve stress and 
spending more time in activities 
that include alcohol. 

But the signs are not the same 
for everyone. Hanger said. 

"Each person may have different 
signs," she said. "The important 
thing for people to know is that 
alcoholism is a treatable condition." 



International Week begins 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

that we are all from different coun- 
tries, but we all share the same 
world," Chiharu Blatt, second grader 
from Amanda Arnold Elementary 
School, said. 

As part of the International Week 
Opening Ceremonies, fourth-grade 
students from Lee Elementary School 
sang "Love in Any Language." K- 
Suue faculty and staff members wel- 
comed the audience in various lan- 
guages, and Smruti Patel, graduate 
student in mathematics, performed an 
Invocation Dance from India. 

Manhattan Mayor Roger 
Maughmer and Karen McCulloh, 



chairwoman of the Riley County 
Commissioners made an official state- 
ment proclaiming the week of April 
1 1-16, 1994, as International Week in 
celebration of the theme "One World, 
Hand in Hand." 

"As one who has traveled around 
the world and to different countries a 
lot, I am very supportive of interna- 
tional people." McCulloh said. 

The proclamation was signed and 
given to Kouakou. 

"It's good to know that a commu- 
nity such as Ma-'iatian is supportive 
of international students' activities," 
Kouakou said. 

K-State students have a unique 
opportunity because of the large inter- 



national student population here, K- 
Statc president Jon Wefald said. 

'The students at K-State have the 
opportunity to meet over 1,200 stu- 
dents from other counties without 
having to leave this country." 

Although International Week is 
only a week-long event, international 
diversity should be celebrated all year 
round, A run a Michie, president of 
Faculty Senate and associate profes- 
sor of political science, said. 

"There are several weeks that we 
celebrate various things throughout 
the year here at K-State, and our hope 
is that the spirit of each of these 
weeks carries over throughout the 
year" Michie said. 



Grievances filed; **£ 
Tribunal to hear appeals 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

regularly scheduled meeting 
before discussing it on the 
floor of the Senate," he said. 

Skoog also said he didn't 
think it would be necessary 
for the operations committee 
to review the complaints 
because the Election 
Committee already has made a 
decision to reschedule the 
UOB vote. 

However, if the complaints 
were reviewed, Skoog said he 
thought they would be 
reviewed by the tribunal to 
eliminate any questions of 



bias. 

Several member* of the 
operations committee are run- 
ning in the SGA election. 

"We're exploring whether 
to take this to the tribunal 
instead of the senate OPS 
committee," he said. 

Tribunal is already sched- 
uled to meet Thursday night to 
discuss two appeals made by a 
presidential candidate and his 
running mate and a candidate 
for the Board of Student 
Publications. 



4 K-State students get 
Goldwater scholarship 



This Week's Specials: 

Tacos 3 for $1 .35 m «»«.) 

Chill Burrlto *1 .99 *»«««| 



Good through 4-16-94 



ColkfiH 

Four K-State students do not 
have to worry about getting money 
to pay for their fees, tuition, books 
or housing for the next two years. 

Craig Behnke, junior in bio- 
chemistry and microbiology; Mark 
Berger, junior in mathematics and 
math education; Craig Caylor, 
junior in physics and mathematics; 
and Claire Stroede. junior in 
mechanical engineering, are recipi- 
ents of Barry M. Goldwater schol- 
arships. 

The Goldwater scholarship is 
valued at up to $14,000 and was set 
up by Congress in 1989 for science 
and math students. 

"Even though I can get up to 
$7,000 a year, the financial-aid 
office figures up exactly how much 
my tuition, fees, books and housing 
will cost next year, and that's the 



amount 1 get," Behnke said. 

The winners do not get die extra 
money if there is any left over from 
the $7,000 because that money is 
put back into the fund, he said. 

After winning these four schol- 
arships, K-State has won 19 times 
and is tied for third in the nation 
with Montana State University. 

Harvard and Princeton have had 
20 winners and are tied for first 

"K-State students have been 
very successful in the Goldwater 
scholarship competition since it 
began in 1989," said Nancy Twiss, 
scholar adviser and assistant to the 
provost for scholarship develop- 
ment. 

The winners said they agree 
Twiss should get credit for her 
work in helping them fill out their 
applications and helping them write 
their essays. 

"A great big thanks goes to 



Nancy because she spent so much 
time with me working on my appli- 
cation getting it to look awesome 
and making me rewrite my essay 
over and over again until it was per- 
fect" Berger said. 

Also, the students said writing 
the essays and filling out the appli- 
cation was a worthwhile effort. 

"By having to put these things 
down on paper so many times. I 
gained a better understanding of the 
research 1 was doing and even some 
insights I'd never thought possi- 
ble." Caylor said. 



2809 Cliifhn 



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8 



Wedneadey, April 13, 1994 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Famous freeway opens early 



TIm Santa 

Monica 



opens 12 
weeks after 
earthquake. 



LOS ANGELES — Even 
the traffic jama looked 
tweet Tuesday on the Santa 
Monica Freeway as com- 
muters on the world's 
busiest freeway waved from 
their windows, and politi- 
cians celebrated the quake- 
severed road's early reopen- 
ing. 

Repairs were finished 12 
weeks after the Jan. 17 
quake, earning the contrac- 
tor $15 million in early 
completion bonuses. It's 
money that commuter Faisal 
Ruble said he considers well 
spent. 

"It's excellent. I think it 
was worth it," Roble said, 
whose 13-mile trip from 



coastal Santa Monica to 
downtown Los Angeles was 
trimmed to 20 minutes from 
the 45 it had taken using 
city street detours. 

"I think it's really neat. 
I'm tired of getting off over 
there and going around," 
Linda Sanchez said as she 
turned onto the freeway, the 
westernmost section of 
cross-country Interstate 10. 

The freeway was to have 
reopened Tuesday morning, 
but officials allowed traffic 
onto it late Monday — just 
in time for Gov. Pete 
Wilson, who is running for 
re-election, to make the 1 1 
p.m. news. 

Transportation Secretary 
Federico Pena, Wilson and 
Mayor Richard Riordan 



cleared away orange-col' 
ored cones, and six 
California Highway Patrol 
motorcycle officers led the 
first group of motorists 
across the rebuilt spans. 

With their horns blaring, 
the first drivers leaned out 
of their windows, mugging 
for the TV cameras and 
kicking up clouds of dust. 

A few hours later, morn- 
ing gridlock made clear 
things were back to normal 
on the freeway, which han- 
dles more than 300,000 
vehicle trips per day. 

Traffic jams were even 
welcomed at a ceremony 
Tuesday morning, where 
Vice President Al Gore 
joined other politicians. He 
praised the cutting of red 



tape, financial incentives for 
the contractor and coopera- 
tion between all levels of 
government. 

'Traffic has never looked 
so good as it did today on 
the Santa Monica Freeway," 
Riordan said. 

"The rubber is meeting 
the road today," Gore said. 

The reopening mended 
the heart of 'he region's cru- 
cial highway system, ending 
losses to the economy that 
truckers and the Wilson 
administration put at more 
than $1 million a day. 

The celebration was 
marred by accusations of 
political game-playing and 
word that extra safety work 
is needed. 



Pulitzers announced 



NEW YORK — The New York 
Times captured three Pulitzer Prizes 
on Tuesday, including its first for 
photography and one for its cover- 
age of the World Trade Center 
bombing. 

The Chicago Tribune took two 
awards. 

The 1994 Pulitzer for public -ser- 
vice journalism went to the Akron 
Beacon Journal for stories on local 
racial attitudes and the paper's 



attempts to improve communication 
in the northern Ohio city. 

"This is not really the Beacon 
Journal's prize. It's really the com- 
munity's prize," managing editor 
Glenn Guzzo said. "There would be 
no Pulitzer Prize without the enor- 
mous community response to the 
stories." 

The Times' three prizes provided 
a fitting sendoff for retiring execu- 
tive editor Max Frankel. 




Clinton's first pick 
for justice withdraws 



AUDITIONS 



WASHINGTON — President 
Clinton's Supreme Court search 
was scrambled Tuesday as Senate 
Majority Leader George Mitchell 
abruptly withdrew from considera- 
tion. 

Mitchell said he was worried 
taking the job might hurl the 
chances of health care reform pass- 
ing this year. 

Clinton called Mitchell "my 
leading candidate" and said he had 
told the senator Monday night: "I'd 
like to appoint you to the Supreme 
Court if you think we can do our 
work here this year." 

In bowing out, Mitchell told 
reporters he had concluded he 
might not be able to undergo the 
demanding confirmation process 
and keep his promise to shepherd 



health care reform through the 
Senate this year. 

While casting the development 
as a disappointment that set the 
search back a few steps, administra- 
tion officials said Clinton had been 
aware from the outset that legal or 
legislative obstacles could foreclose 
a Mitchell nomination. Because of 
that, other candidates were being 
considered even after Mitchell 
emerged as the favorite, they said. 

U.S. District Judge Jose 
Cabranes of Connecticut was said 
to be high on Clinton's list, and the 
favorite of some advisers who want 
Clinton to name the first Hispanic 
to the high court. Solicitor General 
Drew S. Days III is another con- 
tender, as are at least two federal 
appeals court judges, Richard 
Arnold of Arkansas and Amalya 
Kearse of New York. 



K-STATE SINGERS 

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Program to find kids a home 



TOPEKA — The time limit for 
Kansas children who are waiting to 
be adopted should be one year, state 
officials say. 

Gov. Joan Finney said Tuesday a 
task force she has appointed will try 
to help the slate meet that goal. 

'Too many children are moved 
away from their homes because of 
abuse, neglect or abandonment," 
Gov. Finney said. 

Her comments came at a news 
conference where state officials 
announced that their commitment to 
a program, Families for Kids, 
intended to shorten children's time 
in the system. 

The program is sponsored by the 
W.K. Kellogg Foundation of Battle 
Creek. Mich. Paul Vander Velde. 
spokesman for the program, said the 
program's goal is to streamline the 
system. 

Vander Velde outlined the pro- 
gram's agenda, which includes: 

— A single foster care family for 
a child until an adoptive family is 
found. 

— Adoption within one year. 

— The same caseworker for a 
child from foster care to adoption. 

The foundation recently gave the 
state $100,000 to help remodel fos- 
ter care and adoption programs. 

"It's going to take the whole 
community to work together to 
achieve these outcomes," Vander 
Velde said. 



Also at the news conference, 
Gary Sherrer, who is vice president 
of Bank IV. announced the 
Home finders Project, in which 
groups of volunteers would pass out 
photographs and information about 
youngsters who need to be adopted. 

Donna Whiteman. secretary of 
social and rehabilitation services, 
said too many children in Kansas 
are languishing in the foster-care 
system being bumped from home to 
home. 

There are now 759 children in 
the state awaiting adoption, 
Whiteman said. Half of those have 
been waiting for three or more 
years, and one-fourth have waited 
for five years or longer. 

"That's too long," Whitman said. 

After the news conference, Gov. 
Finney met three children whose 
parents adopted them two years ago. 
Their father, Russell Clary, said he 
and his wife traveled from Denton 
so their children could meet the 
governor. 




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Kansas State University 

5th Annual Pow-Wow 

APRIL 16, 1994 
Ahearn Fieldhouse 

Denison Ave. & College Heights 

Gourd Dancing begins at 1 p.m. 
Intertribal Dancing begins at 7 p.m. 



Sponsored by 

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The American Indian Science & Engineering Society. 




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April 12-13 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 






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PBS special 
features sex 
in the sea 



NEW YORK — Let's get right to the sex. 

Thai's right. Sex. 

Raw, unbridled, animalistic, recreational sex; 
heavy petting that turi*> to frenzy in the blue 
waters of the Caribbean sex; in other words, 
tonight's National Geographic special on PBS: 
"Jewels of the Caribbean Sea." 

This excellent film, by husband-and-wife 
filmmakers Howard and Michelle Hall, is a beau- 
tifully photographed example of how nature films 
are adapting to their increasingly more sophisti- 
cated audience. 

All that sex. for instance. 

Filmmakers like the Halls have discovered 
that humans really do like to see how other 
species Do It. Audiences these days are much 
less squeamish — or is it less childish? — about 
the facts of life on TV. 

In "Jewels of the Caribbean," sometimes even 
the sex gets a bit abstract. 

Take, for example, when a single live coral 
gets the urge and lets go. Folks, that triggers the 
other coral and, as you might well imagine, when 
an entire reef gets the urge, the waters can get 
mighty cloudy. 

Sometimes the sex is pretty. 

Take that male squid there. Lobed. fringed and 
pulsating a display of changing colors more lumi- 
nous and vivid than a peacock's tail, he competes 
with other males to put on the best light show. 

The mating itself is kind of a tag- you're- it let- 
down, in which he uses a special limb to attach a 
packet of sperm to her. The female gets to decide 
whether to keep it, for self-fertilization, or wait 
for a better deal. 

And, oh yeah, don't forget the casual, recre- 
ational sex. 

In this instance, it's provided by dolphins. For 
an added thrill, it's sex between two different 
species of dolphin — behavior that has been 
rarely filmed in the wild. 

In "Jewels," we see two female, spotted dol- 
phins, engage two male bottlenose dolphins in 
play. 

When you're a dolphin, play and petting and 
sex itself are pretty difficult to tell apart. Things 
gel pretty intense pretty quickly. 

The fascinating thing (other than, "Wow, so 
that's how dolphins do it") is that the transspecies 
sex serves no genetic purpose. Any offspring 
would be hybrids — sterile and unable to repro- 
duce. 

And that means that the dolphins are much 
like other mammals — humans and chimpanzees, 
for instance — who have sex just for the fun of it. 



Romantic pieces chosed for final orchestra concert 



OUaata 

Love and romance from the 19th 
century will fill the air when the 
KSU Orchestra performs its final 
concert of the season at 8 p.m. 
Tuesday in McCain Auditorium. 

Romantic period selections have 
been chosen for the performance. 
This period is considered to be from 
1820 to about 1900. 

The music of this time was 
marked by intensely personal 
expressions of emotion. 

The first half of the program will 
feature two music students who 
won a concerto and aria contest in 
December. 

Soloist Ed Raines, senior in 
music education, will sing the aria 



"Nessun dorma!" from Puccini's 
opera "Turandot." 

The opera, set in ancient China, 
is the story of a princess who makes 
her suitors guess three riddles. If the 
men do not answer correctly, they 
are beheaded. 

Raines said one of the suitors, 
Calaf, guesses the riddles correctly. 
"It's a victorious aria," Raines said. 

"He is glad he isn't going to 
die." 

The scene takes place in the wee 
hours of the morning as Calaf sings 
to his princess. 

"'Nessun dorma' means no one 
sleeps tonight," Raines said. 

The second soloist will perform 
Piano Concerto No. 1 in E-flat 
major by Franz Liszt 



Yun Chung Chang, senior in 
music, performed this piece in the 
December contest. 

"This concerto is from the height 
of the Romantic period," Chang 
said. 

**It does not have a clear move- 
ment separation, but several tempo 
sections," she said. "Technically, 
it's really challenging." 

David Littrell, professor of 
music, has selected Rachmarunov's 
Second Symphony for the last half 
of the evening's performance. 

"This is the last gasp of the 19th 
century," Littrell said. 

"It was written during the last 
years of the Romantic period when 
music began to change drastically," 




Santa sends coal to phone pranksters 



Write to Cwtandrt, 

116 Kedde Hall, 
Manhattan, Kan. 



Dear Cassandra, 

We were having what 
we thought was a little fun, 
but we are beginning to 
think that we are probably 
hurting other people. 

One night, we decided to 
make prank phone calls. 
We were imitating a DJ 
who was giving out front 
row tickets to the Brooks 
and Dunn concert. We 
coerced people to make 
farm animal noises and 
break precious valuables. 

We thought it was very 
humorous until someone 
claiming to be Santa heard 



about what we were doing 
and sent us a lump of coal 
in the mail. He informed us 
that these people might be 
really expecting the tickets. 
We are wondering 
whether these people could 
figure out that it was only a 
joke or if we need to rectify 
the situation. If you think 
we should listen to this 
Santa, please give us some 
ideas. The calls were ran- 
dom so we have no way to 
call these people back. 

Signed, 

A few tickets short 



Dear Short, 

Gee, I didn't think 
junior-high-school kids 
wrote letters to Cassandra. 

I pulled stupid, juvenile 
pranks similar to yours in 
elementary school. My 
favorite prank was calling 
up the Howard Johnsons in 
town and asking for a 
room. 

Back to your situation, I 
think if you represented 
yourself as a real radio sta- 
tion, the individuals you 
called probably showed up 
at the station and found 
there were no tickets. 




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Monday - Friday 

3:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. 
Sunday - Thursday 

0:30 p.m. - 12:30 a.m. 
twh*n TTnSSBir «r* In uwlon) 



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Seaton Hall 106N 



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active, it is a healthy idea to get 
regular checks for STD (Sexually 
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you have symptoms or NOT I 

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FOR APPOINTMENT 



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■1 Q W*dn—dw April 13. 1>«4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



'World' gives facelift 
to life's age-old story 



MhtfM 

Man meets woman. Man wants 
woman. Woman plays hard to get. 
Man bargains for woman. And so 
goes the world. 

And so goes the English comedy. 
"The Way of the World." 

"The Way of the World," written 
by William Congreve, is the current 
production being undertaken by the 
K State theater department. 

The play is considered the con- 
summation of the Restoration come- 
dies. 

Director Lew Shelton, associate 
professor of theater, describes the 
play as one of the best of Congreve's 
plays and also the most difficult to 
stage. Shelton said Congreve is 
known for his high comedy and use of 
language. 

In "World," Congreve puts some 
twists in the typical Restoration style 
by adding some surprises. For 
instance, the Rake (a social miscast 
who spends his time living it up) turns 
out to be the good person. 

Shelton said many may find the 
play hard to understand. In the first 
act, during the exposition, people are 
named and relationships are men- 



tioned. However, he said the cast and 
crew have decided to include a family 
tree that, if the audience chooses to 
read, should make everything clear. 

Ayne Steinkuehler, graduate 
student in theater, plays the part of 
Millament, 

"The language was much more dif- 
ficult to memorize," Steinkuehler 
said. "It isn't conversational. It's a 
very difficult play." 

Shelton said he considered the lan- 
guage used in the play the hardest dif- 
ficulty to surpass. 

He also said trying to get the cast 
to act a bit more elegant and graceful 
was another obstacle. 

"The underlying conflicts aren't 
easy to pick out," Shelton said. He 
said he made the cast duel each other 
with rolled up newspapers so they 
would understand the tension in the 
play and where it comes from. 

Although "World" was written in 
1 700, set designer David Centers and 
Shelton decided to bring the play up 
to date, if you will, by placing it in the 
Edwardian period of England (the 
turn of the century). The set draws 
most of its style from Art Nouveau. 

"Pre-World War I looks very 20th 
century, but it is still far removed 




from current styles," Shelton said. 
This allows the play to retain its 
older, refined appeal. 

Shelton said by somewhat modern- 
izing the play, the audience will be 



able to pick up on some of the mod- 
em themes. 

He particularly mentioned the 
leading woman, Millament, who 
expresses some ideas that tend to be 



modern — "like not being under the 
thumb of her husband." 

That was probably viewed as 
excruciatingly funny in the 18th cen- 
tury. 



UdyWMifort, 

played by Morel 
Cony, 

enthualaatlcalty 
tells har aervan! 
Folbla. played by 
Rachel Pearson, 
how much she Is 
looking forward 
to her upcoming 
wedding during 
dress reherssl for 
"Way of the 
World" Monday 
night at Nichols 




■ KSU 
►HI d. esem Tlift 
Way el to rVW 
at 8 pm. Aprl 14- 
16 and 20-23 in 
Nfchofc Theamj, 

■ Tickets can 
be purchased at 
the McCain 
Auditorium Box 
Offca of by caling 
532-6428 



Students 

win 1st in 

design 



LOW DAVIS 



Cabajha 

Four interior architecture stu- 
dents have brought home three of 
five first-place awards and a best 
of show from a national design 
competition in late March. 

Heather Brunken, Brian 
Diederich, Steven Meyers and 
Brenna Terbovich, fifth-year 
seniors in interior architecture, 
won four out of the nine awards 
at the Institute of Business 



Designers competition in 
Winston-Salem. N.C. 

For the competition, each stu- 
dent presented designs for a 
7,500 square-foot office for the 
Italian Trade Commission. 

Space planning, corporate 
logo design, materials, furniture 
and fixture selections and specifi- 
cations were required elements of 
the design. 

Brunken placed first, and 
Diederich placed second in the 



presentation category. In the cor- 
porate logo division, Terbovich 
took first place. 

Meyers won best of competi- 
tion. 

"I think that it's great that one 
school can take four awards in a 
national competition." Diederich 
said. 

"That says a lot for the quality 
of education." 

Jim Dubois, associate profes- 
sor of interior architecture, said 



he is excited for the students. 

"It's a good reflection on the 
quality of students we have," he 
said. "I think that shows the pride 
in their work. 

"It reflects on the University 
as well as reflecting on all the 
faculty in the program," he said. 

However, some of the stu- 
dents gained more than just 
awards. 

For Terbovich, the project she 
created for the competition was a 



culmination of research she 
began when she studied in Italy 
last year. 

She said notes and design 
solutions she learned were instru- 
mental in her project. 

"I think it summarized a lot of 
my research I did overseas," 
Terbovich said. 

"I've grown to understand 
what I was researching." 

The award, Terbovich said, 
would aid in her job search. 




LASSIFIEDS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



OUR BASIC RATE 

To njn 20 words or les* tar one day 
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per wort. Call S32-6SSS tor consecutive 
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before the dat* ft 



ifttidrunt. 



or Vise a* 



Call 532-6555 
to place your classified. 




PARKING 

OF THE 



OFFICE HOURS: MONDAWMDAY 8 a,m.-5 p.m. (except holiday*) 



Q*Wirtl:ffllimilCT>WPMIt* 



000 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 



0101 



An nouncama n t * 



ACCC AQ ALUMNI RE- 
UNION. Sat April 
16. 2:30p.m. Col- 
lee* Farm. For more 
information contact 
Tarry Powelson or Bac 
Niton 1316)365 5116 

ADVANCED FLIGHT Train- 
ing. Multlengine pri- 
vate, commercial, or 
ATP In Twin Comanche 
with HSI. RMI, GPS, 
Storm Scop* Hugh Ir- 
vin. 539 3128 

COME FLV with us, K State 
Flying Club hat four air 
planet. For beat prices 
call S»m Knipp, 539- 
0193 after 5:30p.m. 

DON'T LOSE track of 
■rtenoe tni* summert 
Buy a Campus Direc- 
tory today. Available in 
103 Kadila. S3 with 
at u dent ID, S3 25 with 
faculty/ itaff 10. $4 oth 
ere. Campua Office* 
please purchase from 
KSU Office Supplies at 
the Union Bookstore. 

LOSE ALL the weight you 
can In April for fRIBI 
Food not included. Call 
Nutrl/Syetem for de 
tells. 7764*00. 



Lost and Found 



Found ada cm be 
placed free far three 



FOUND: SET of keys on 
sidewalk at lain and 
Feirchlld 539-6062 



0301 



Wa require a farm of 
picture ID IK.SU, driv- 
er'* llaaoao or other) 
■whan placing a par. 



KAPPA SIGS- GOOD luck 
•t Up Sync. Your AXD 
coaches love you. Dam, 
Tiffany, Bach alia, Jen 
and Andrea. 



Parttaa-n -Mora 

CREATE HOT wet memo- 
ries with your next par- 
ty Wet N Wild Mobile 
Hot Tub Rentals. Year 
round a variability 537 
1825, 


next to campus. $310 

plus electric, plus da- 
posit. Aug. year lease, 
nopals, 537-1180. 

TWO, THREE end 

fou r-bedroom. Very 
good condition. Wind- 
ow eir, gas heat end 
carpeted. Available in 
June. 637-7334 

TWO STORY duplex with 
patio. One and one- ha If 
blocks east of Ford Hall, 
two full bathrooms, 
four offstrsst perking 
stall*. 1401 McCain 
$600 per month. 
539-7693 


100 


HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 


TWO-BEDROOM. LUXURI- 
OUS apartment* near 
campus and opposite 
city perk at 1200 Fre- 
mont for June or Au- 
gust. Carpeted, central 
air, dishwasher and dis- 
posal. No pat*. $465. 
537-0428. 

UNUSUALLY LARGE near 


For Rant- 
Apia. FumWiaei 


APARTMENTS, MOBILE 
Homes, no complexes. 
Furnished, unfurnished 
10 or 12 month leases. 
June or Aug. No par- 
flea, no pets, 5374389 

AUGUST LEASE- next to 
campus, across Marian 
and Goodnow Hall 
(1832 Clatltn) one/ 


new duplex. Three-bad- 
room, two bath adja- 
cent cempus, beautiful- 
ly furnished. No pet* or 
smoking. Slockwell 
Real Estate 536-4073. 

For Rant- 
Apt. 

Unfumlahad 


two-bedroom 
539-2702 evenings/ 
message 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1. Large 
two-bedroom apart- 
ment. S4O0 519 Osage 
water/ trash paid, dish- 
washer, garbage dispo- 
sal, low utilities, 
776-2363. 

AVAILABLE NOW, sum- 
mer and fall. Very nice 
two, three and 
four-bedroom apart- 
ment complexes and 
houses. Near campus 
with great price*. 
537-16*S. 537-2918 

FOR AUG. Next to KSU. De- 
luxe two-bedroom 
apartment, $48$. Pay 
only electric. 539-2*82, 
attar 4p.m. 

FOR RENT, two room*. 

nonsmoking, partly 
furnished, traah paid, 
one-fourth utilities 
Close to campus, call 
537-6764. 

LARGE TWO and 

three-bedroom apart- 
mante close to campus, 
Agglevllle end City 
Park. Available June 1. 
539-1713. 

NEAR KSU eommer loese 
only. Nice two-bad 
room basement apart- 
ment $300, 639-2482, 
after 4p.m. 

ONE-BEDROOM STUDIO 
In complex. 1219 Cleflln 


1218 KEARNEY one-bed 
room. Water/ troth 
paid. No pet*. Year 
leas* beginning June 1. 
$325 per month, 
539-6136 

814 THURSTON studio wa- 
ter/ trash paid. No pets/ 
smokers June 1 lease. 
$270. Cell 539-5136. 

AVAILABLE IMME- 
DIATELY, nice two bed- 
room, 617 N. 12th, 
$575. water, Iresh paid. 
Close to campus. 776 
3804 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1. 
One-bedroom $340, 
two-bedroom $510 

1966 College Heights. 
Water/ trash paid Close 
to campus 776-3804. 

AVAILABLE MAY 1, 
one-bedroom 1024 
Laramie $325 including 
all utilities, one-year 
lee**, no pats. Also one 
and two -bedroom for 
Aug. the Housing Co. 
539-2255. 

AVAILABLE NOW, 
one-bedroom 1022 
Sunset, 6345. Water/ 
treah paid. Close to 
campus. 776-3804. 

AVAILABLE NOW, sum. 
mer and fall. Very nice 
two. three and 

four-bedroom apart- 
ment complex** and 
house* N**r campus 



real price* 



with great prl< 
537-1666,537-2919 



SOLTHSTONE 

A part m en ts 

1509A1S09V,Fairchlld 

2 blocks to campus 

LARGE 1 bedroom units 

Laundry Room 

OH street parking 

June to June Lease 
S3407MO 

Call to view 

537-4770 

Arlen Carlson 



ROYAL 
TOWERS 

Apartments 
1 700 N, Manhattan 

Now Leasing 
for June & August 



4 



1 bedroom and 
bedroom / 2 bath 
$395 and $860 



Refrigerator 
w/tcemaker, range. 

microwave It 

dlthwaaher. 

Resident Center with 

hot tub*, deck and 

lawisJwaoaL 

MODE! SHOWINGS; 
No AppotntmtnU Takwn 




AVAILABLE NOW, 

three-bedroom, close 
10 City Park. 300 N. 
11th, $438 Upstair* 

unit Water/ trash paid 
776-3804 

AVAILABLE NOW, 

two-bedroom by City 



Perk. 1026 Osage S48G. 
Water/ treeh paid. 
776-3804. 



Brittnay 
Ridge 




Town Horn 



Now Leasing 

For June & August 

* Compare* 

•vary Mice" 1500 sq. 

ft, 4 bedroom. Z'A 

bath townhomes 

Refrigerator, range. 

microwave, 

dishwasher. 

BBQ gaieboi and 

land volleyball court. 

•fulf-size* 
washer/dryer 
in each unit. 

For only 
I860 mo. 



MODEL 

SHOWINOS: 
No AppotntmtnU Taktn 



rJfevi 



Gate 
2418 Cendts Crew Orsfa 




K-Rtntal Mi;mi. 



Studio $220 up 

1 Bedroom $290 up 

2 Bedrooms $330 up 

3 Bedrooms $480 



5.VJ-840I 



AVAILABLE NOW. Spa 
clout two-bedroom. 
Close to cempus. 1828 
College Heights. leWO. 
Waters Iresh paid. 
776-3604. 



CHASE MANHATTAN 
APARTMENTS OFF 
EM YOU ALL THI 
COfeWOWTB OF NEW: 

modern Interior*, di»h 
washers, microwevea. 
clubhouse with swim- 
ming pool, sun deck, 
laundry, lounge, and 
workout facilities in- 
cluding stairmasters, 
exercise bike*, weights, 
and TVI Occupancy 
nearing 100 percent. 
Don't miss out! Celt to 
dsyl 776-3663 

JUNE AND Aug. availabili- 
ty. On*, two and 
four-bedroom 1017- 
1029 McCollum 5365- 
5800 Close to campus. 
776-3804. 

LARGE TWO- ihree-bed 
room apartment 10 
minute walk from Sea- 
ion Hall. With washer/ 
dryer 220 air condition. 
5550/ month. Call 
537-7142 (pal* a 
maybe). 

NOW LEASING for Aug. 
1001 flluomont 5760 
Very large two-bed- 
room, two bath. Nice 
unit*. Close to Ag- 
gieville. 776-0804 



IHim/nWI'vKIMrMs 



•Quality 2 Bedrooms* 
1212 Bluemonl $500 
1 106 Bluemonl $500 
907 Vattier $490 



S4H I 



ONE-BEDROOM AVAIL 
ABLE April 15. 1222 
Laramie 5325. All utili- 
ties paid Cloee to cem- 
pus. 776-3004 

ONE-BEDROOM BASE- 
MENT apartment. 820 
Osaga 1210. Available 
April 15 Wat*r/ trash 
paid. 776-3804 

OVERLOOK CAMPUS, two 
bedroom , dlihwesher, 
fireplace, laundry facili. 
ty. Available Aug. 1. 
6510. 537-2255 

PARK PLACE APART 
MENTS Now pre-leea 
ing one, two and 
three-bedrooms. 
538-2961 

SPACIOUS TWO-BED- 
ROOM apartment at 

Woodway. Modern ap- 
pliances, low utilities, 



AUGUST LEASES 

S6 jJS S S SJ Apt'- '>*lf l»ln*r \pU. 

•Cottrir Hnttm 

Large 1 Bnlrwm llaiu 

537-9064 

IWIi.ln. ') • ni I :M I- m 



ceiling fan. For Aug. 1 
leas*. Call 776-7950 

after 5pm. 

TWO-BEDROOM AVAIL 
ABLE In June. 1126 Fre- 
monl SS10. Tra*h paid 
Dishwasher, garbage 
disposal, laundry facili - 
ties on-sita. Cloee to 
City Park and Ag- 
gieville 776-3804. 

TWO-BEDROOM, CLOSE 
to cempus. Available 
Aug. 1, no pats, 
539-2551 

TWO THREE-BEDROOMS 
one and one-half bath. 
Central air, laundry, 
near campu*. available 
June or Aug. 537-8800. 

TWO, TWO-BEDROOM 
apartment*. S665 par 
month. On* month da 
poeit Include* trash and 



lawn care. Washer and 
dryer hook- ups, ap- 
pliance*, central air and 
heel, two full bathe. 
L esses begin May 1 or 
June 30. Call 539-8800 

TWO-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT, one end one- 
half b*th, central air, 
laudry facilities. Alto 
three-bedroom in e 
house available in June 
and Aug 776-8725 

VERY NICE four-bedroom 
house available May 1. 
1817 Collage Heights, 
SI 200. All utilities paid. 
Close to campu*. 
776-3804. 

VERV NICE. Next to cam- 

fiu*. One, two, three, 
our-bedroom houses 
end apartment* with 
w**har/ dryer central 
air S33S- $900 537-8543 

1181 



Available 



FOR RENT: one or 
two-bedroom* of a 
house. Close to cam- 
pu*. Rant $138. Laun- 



APARTMENTS 


■ \mv Leasing for June & \ugusl 


MODLL SHOWINGS 




\l 1 rsli'il limn Hi Urn 


\.| \|'|'n:.tillli M1-, l.lkl'M 




1 *ONE BEDROOM* 1 


| *MUITMJNIT HOUSES* | 


1300 


— 300 N. Uth, 1 Bedroom 


— 1854-58 Claflin $355-380 


Model: By Appt. Only 




Cloee to campus 

Model: Wed. fc Fri. 3-5 p.m. 


— 1503 FairehUd, 1, 2 Bedroom* 


S 250-300 


Model: By Appt Only 




1*58 CUflin #8 


— 924 PMmont 1 Bedroom 


1300 


— 1005 Bluemont 1385-465 
Ckaa* to Acgkevltle 

Model: Mem. it Wed. 6-8 p.m. 


Model: By Appt. Only 








100S Bluemont #10 






— 1022, 34, 26 Sunset $345-395 
Cloee to camp us. 

Modal: Tu.es. h Thun. 4-5 p. m. 


*I BEDROOM-EXTRA SPACIOUS* 


— 1825-29 College Ht*. 


$720-840 


1022 Sunset #2 

— 1950-1960 Hunting $435455 

Model; By Appt, Only 


Furnished. 

Model: Tue* * Thunv 6-8 p.m. 




— 1722 Laramie $370-385 


l«25CoUejeHt*.#4 




Model: Wed. 6:30-8:30 p.m. 


— 1001 Buiemom 


$780 


er Set 10:30 a nv- 1 2 JO p.m. 






1722 Laramie #5 
— 41M3-15 N. 17th $340-380 


Model. Mon.lt Wed. 6-8 p.m. 




Model: By Appointment Only 


1005 Bluemonl 110 




♦ TWO BEDROOMS* 

— 405N.lQth 1385410 

Model; By Appointment Only 


— AggJevilst Ptnmouae Apt*. 


$550-700 


Newly remodeled 

Model: By Appt Only 
— 1113 stetraml 


SS75 


— 1417-1419 Leavenworth $475-195 
Vvtae of City Park 

Model By Appt Only 


Next to campus 

Model: By Appt Only 




• - - "-B Managed by McCullough Development 




- 


776-3804 














KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



W«tr>— ctoy, April 13, 1W4 4 -f 



Collegian Classifieds 



dry. Jun* 1 least Call 
Sara or Kelly at 

779-6740 



FOUR-BEDROOM HOUSE, 
west of campus, centrsl 
•Ir. appliances. For 
Juna f $800, 537-1269. 

FOUR-BEDROOM UNFUR- 
NISHED house, Juna 
■Mt. 539-1975. 

NON-DRINKING AND 
smoking, lor two and 
three-bedroom place s. 
No pat*, References. 
539-1554. 

THREE-BEDROOM 

HOUSE, new washer/ 
dryer, dishwasher, can 
tral air. heal. Close to 
campus. 539-2914 






QUIT PAYING NEHTI 
NIC* Older home cur 
rently duplex. Three 
bedrooms plua and stu- 
dio with HW/ aolar. 
Convarta to Isrge homa 
or stay •• I* and BARN 
HINT- Cloa* to park. 
downtown and KSU. 
Studanta take this to 
your paranta. 1 BOO 
593 OS 19 Alter Tp.m. 
Pr Ked In the SO'*. 



11X58 GREAT Lekee. Re- 
cently ramodelad. 
Mafor appliancaa at ay 
Vary good condition. 
Fenced In yard, pata el- 
lowed. Low lot rant. 
776-3136. 

1992 CHAMPION Mobila 
Homa, thraa-badroom, 
two bath, central heat 
and air, deck, at o rage 
•had, appliance*, 
ofl-etreet parking, ap- 
proximately $325/ 
month, located in Colo- 
nlal Garden*. 776-3433 

COUNTRYSIDE BROKER. 

AGE will *all your mo- 
bila homa for you. We 
have fantastic result*. 
We do our own financ- 
ing. Call 539- 232S. 

TIRED OF paying rent? Buy 
my 70X12, two-bed- 
room. 1967 Skyline Mo- 
bila Home for only 
$4000, call 539-2228, 




FEMALE ROOMMATE for 
summer needed to 
ahare fully lurmShed 
two-badroom apart- 
ment. 12601 month. Wa- 
ter/ trash paid. No pet*. 
776-9858 Heather. 

FEMALE ROOMMATES for 
four-bedroom/ two 
bathroom. Own room, 
washer/ dryar. Fall/ 
spring/ summer avail- 
able. Very close to cam- 
pus. Soma pet* accept- 
ed. 537-4595. 

MALE ROOMMATE need- 
ed for summer. Own 
bedroom, Nice! Next to 
campus, SI 50 plua utili- 
ties. Cell Dave at 
1587-0726. 

MALE ROOMMATES need 
ed to share ■ three -bed- 
room house. Call 539 
3728. ask for Mart 

NEED FEMALES to Share a 
summer aublaaee on a 
three-bedroom apart- 
ment. Furnished, water/ 
trash paid. Very close 
to campus. Call 
778-2358. 

NON- SMOKER TO share 
four-bedroom home, 
close to campus, IiBO a 
month plus one-fourth 
light, cable and phone. 
Mull have a sense of 
humor. Call 776-0847 
or 532-2244. 

NONSMOKING ROOM- 
MATE to share house. 
Own room, own bath, 
own Irving room, wash 



tr, dryer, central air, 
yard. Mac, 7784723, 

ROOMMATE NEE0ED to 
share five-bedroom 
house. $1 60 par month 
plua one-fifth utilities 
Close to campus. Call 
537-1621 

ROOMMATE WANTED: 
male or female. Share 
three-bedroom, pool- 
side apartment with 
two male roommatea. 
Fall 94- spring 96 $210/ 
month plus one-third 
utilities. Non-smoker. 
Call Brian 532-8184 or 
Mike 532-5492 

WANTED NON-SMOKING 

end non-drinking male 
for basement furnished 
privste bedroom. Walk 
to KSU. S150. Share 
utilities. 539-1664. 



1829 COLLEGE Halghts. 
Summer sublease 
two-bedroom, fully fur- 
nished, dishwasher, 
central air. Up to four 
people. Rant negoti- 
able. Call 539-6895 

AVAILABLE MID-MA V- 
Aug Sub leaser* need- 
ed for two-bedroom 
apartment. Cloae to 
campus/ Aggieville. Fur 
niehed with washer and 
dryer. Rent negotiable 
776-4039. 

AVAILABLE MID-MAY 

through I ate August. 
One and one-half 
blocks from campua, 
partially furnished, 
washer, dryer, one -half 
utilities, rant negoti 
able 776-4021. 

CHEAP RENT for summer 
sublease. Vary nice 
apartment. One block 
from campus. Only 
8130 a month. Needed 
either May or Juna 
until Aug. 1. Female 
roommate preferred. 
Call 776-1495. Ask for 
Gin*. 

DESPERATELY NEED fe- 
male to sublease Wood- 
way, four-bedroom. 
Half price! 1100/ 
month. New pool. Avail- 
able May IS. Laurie, 
507-0598 

DESPERATELY SEEKING 

summer sub leasers for 
two-bedroom apart- 
ment. Ctoee to campus 
and Aoglevilla No rea- 
sonable offer refused I 
537-3631. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed. Mid May to 
July 31. May rant paid. 
Woodway Apartments 
S190 plus one-fourth 
utilities. Call Ann 
537-1488. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

needed. Available 
mid-May to July 31. 
May rent le paid. Wood 
way Apartments $150 
plus one-third utilities. 
Call Michelle 776-7151. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to 

sublease three-bed- 
room apartment. 
Across the street from 
campus. Own room. 
Rant negotiable. Call 
for details 539 3839. 

FEMALES NEEDED for 

three-bedroom. Water, 
tre»h paid. $160/ month 
plus one-third utilities 
Off-street parking 
Close to campui 
539-3091. 

FOR SUMMER, one room 
In three-bedroom 
apartment at $170 a 
month plua one-fourth 
utilities. Call after 7pm, 
ask (or Amy 539-6492 

FURNISHED ONE-BED- 
ROOM apartment. 

Close to campui, sir- 
conditioning. Available 
mid-May to August. 
Ranto negotiable. Call 
537-9633 Or leave mes- 



HOT DAYS, need new 
pool. We need summer 
sublessees) for 

three-bedroom at 
Woodway, furniture/ 
rent negotiable. Call 
632-2128 or 532-2375 

JUNE AND July subteaae, 
Nice, clean two-bad- 
room, one bath. Wash- 






fflEMRDERB 

JIM THE BEGINNING! 

KetlMU CHy a/ac 

The beginning of on eicltlna challenging and 
rewards-* career win Toco Bel, a $37 Txflton 
dMston of the prestigious Fortune 50 PepsiCo. 
We hove management opportunities lor bright 
bvemest professlonak who are secure and self 
assured that they how who* * tales lo successful/ 
monoge a meson dolor plui busine**- If you ore 
on energetic. tef-suHtdenf hdNtduat and can 
role on tie oSdfenae of of doy to day operatton*; 
human resource*, marketing, public relation* and 
P41 manogemenl, you will succeed wen uel 

CanoWal e* should have e w le n t super visor y, 
cagntth-e and interpersonal skits Experience In 
•owcxxj and bulking employee learnt at of 
levels with a background In retail, sale*, or lood 
service desirable BA/BS preferred. 

Our rewords are tremendous. Including salary 
co roner e vroto wfh enper tsnce, kicrahv* bonus pro 
gram, and o benefit* pockoue thai includes our 
unique stock ophon pogrom Sharef ower. Our 
greased benefit K If* opportunity lor eictlng 
career growth, hdudhg the potential to manage 

N*Jwl]pssV lOGCftofBsl 

• you'n* ready to accept sSa dSdUnga of worldng 
wth o dynamic corporation, please send your 

SBSefelR % *S* **- 3*o w. 

•vrterfieta Id. I s*** 300 U n dx i el, II 

60ti6. Eoe rwfro/v 



erf dryer Ctoee to cam 
pus. Call 776-3144. 

MALE/ FEMALE roommate 
needed for summer 
with option tor longer 
Free washer/ dryer. 
Close to Aggieville 
Walk to campua. $200 
plus one-fourth utili- 
ties. 778-4148 leave 
■ lor Chris 



NICE TWO-BEDROOM, 
1326 N. Manhattan. 
May or June until July 
31. No pets. $525. 776 
7998 

NON-SMOKING FEMALE 
to sublease mid-May to 
Aug. Two-bedroom 
$210 plua one-half mill 
(las two blocks from 
campua 639-4258. 

ONE BEDROOM APART 
MENT Available from 
May 1- July 31 Rent Is 
8300. One block from 
campus. Plessa call 
587-0117 after 5p.m. 

ONE BEDROOM basement 

apartment available 
mid-May through mid 
August. Rent $200. 
Washer, dryer, air con- 
ditioner, partly fur 
nishsd. Close to cam- 
pus acroaa from Ford 
Hall. Call evening* at 
7764835 

ONE-BE0ROOM SUB- 
LEASE June and Jury at 
Park Place 8330 a 
month. Two poots. Can 
renew lease Call Mike 
at 639-3666. 

ONE BEDROOM, June- 
July, $186Anonth nego- 
tiable. Call 539-3683, 
aak for Bob. 

0NE-SEDR0OM, LOW 

rant one-third utilities. 
with pool. From May 
to Aug 776-0666, Ja- 
nice). 

ONE BLOCK from campus. 
Furnished. Dishwasher 
washer/ dryer. Own 
room May 12 to July 
31. No pet*. 776-9869. 
Heather 

ONE, TWO or three-bed- 
room* available In 
three-bedroom apart- 
ment. One and 
ona-half baths. Sum- 
mar 1019 Fremont. 
637-4445. 

PERSONS NEEDED for 
summer. Available 
mid-May to July or 
maybe sooner Price ia 
negotiable. Ask for 
Kate, Karen or Leslie at 
539-6492 

SUBLEASE ONE-BED- 
ROOM of two-bed- 
room apartment in 
quiet building. Avail 
able now- July 31. All 
utilities paid, except 
electric, central air, cats 
allowed Call 539-8606. 

SUBLEASE SPACIOUS 
two-badroom apart- 
ment, end of May 
through July. Fur 
nishsd, three block* 
from campus. Rant ne- 
gotiable. If intsreitad 
call 537-3585 

SUBLEASE. THREE-BED- 
ROOM In Woodway for 
June and July. New 
pool. $450 a month or 
beat Offer. 778-6582. 

SUBLEASE: SPACIOUS 
three-bedroom one 

and one-helf bath 
Great summer location 
June and July. Nego- 
tiable. Call 637-3981. 

SUMMER DEALI One-bed- 
room house one tn^ 
ona-half blocks from 
campus. All bills, ex- 
cept phone. $226. Ga- 
rage, washer/ dryer, 
dishwasher. Mid-May 
thru Aug. 778-1652. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 
large, two-badroom 
apartment: two blocks 
from campus, one and 
one-half blocks from 
Aggieville; rent negoti- 
able; call 776-3483. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 

Specioue two-badroom 
apartment. 

Non-smokers only. 
539-4909. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 
Two-bedroom house 
lust across itreet from 
Arby't on Bluemont. 
Available mid- May Call 
776-8667 and leave 



SUMMER SUBLEASE from 
mid-May- July 31 
Close to campua and 
Aggieville, rant negoti 
able 587-0893. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE In 
Royal Towers to share 
furnished four-bed- 
room apartment May- 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, 

nice, negotiable, 

two-bedroom, two 
bath, very close to Ag 
gieville Mid-May- July 
31 Call 838-4123 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, 
one-bedroom. $2*07 
month across from 
Ahearn Nafetorlum 
776-6278. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, two- 
bedroom partially fur 
niahed, close to campus 
and Aggieville. June/ 
July $316/ month, utili- 
ties and deposit. 539- 
9123. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE. Fa- 
male to *hare four-bed- 
room apartment in 
Royal Towers, Own 
room close to campus. 
Available thru July 31, 
$175/ month. Call 
Heather 776-3660 

SUMMER SUBLEASE: Fur- 
nished one-bedroom, 
two blocks from cam- 
pua. available mid-May 
through Aug., water 
and trash paid, rent ne- 
gotiable call 587-0869. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 
Large, furnlahad 

one-bedroom baee- 
ment, one-halt block 
from campus. Quiet, 
non-emoker* wanted 
837-2962. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE; two- 
bedroom furnished 
apartment. 8258 plus 
ullllUes. Call 53s*«7&. 



SUMMER SUBLEASE: 
two-bedroom fur- 
nished apartment, two 
blocks from Aggieville. 
close to cempus. Rent 
negotiable. Available 
mid-May through July 
31. 776-6098. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE: very 
nice three-bedroom 
apartment one block 
from campus and one 
block from Aggieville. 
Available mid-May 
through August. Very 
reaaonsbla rent. 637- 
3572. 

THREE-BEDROOM APART 

MENT for summer, 
close to campus, wash- 
er and dryer, lota of 
room, price negotiable 
call 539-2854. 

THREE-BEDROOM SUB- 
LEASE $175 per room 
June 1 to Aug. 1. Call 

532-2891 

TOWNHOUSE SUMMER 
sublease option to rent. 
Five-bedrooms. 2.5 
bathrooms, washer/ 
dryer. Available on or 
after May 1. $165/ 
month/ person 

537-3027. 

TWO-BEDROOM. FUR- 
NISHED, one block 
from campus. Air con- 
ditioner, dishwasher. 
All utilities paid. Rent 
negotiable Cell/leave 
message, 776-3035. 



20-9 



SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



Xtt*"i_ 



DATA SHEETS, term pa- 
pers, dissertations. 
Laser printer. Fest. ac- 
curate service. 12 years 
experience. Mrs. Bur- 
den, 539-1204 

RESUME RESUME RE- 
SUME and all your 
other word processing 
need*. Laser printing. 
Call Brands. 776-3290. 

WORD PROCESSING dona 

in my homa. Papers, 
resumes, letters, re- 
ports, theses, etc. Con- 
tact Carol anytime at 
776-4398 

WORDPROCESSING SUP 
PORT for your acade- 
mic and professional 
needa. Papers, 

resumes, letters, re- 



f torts. Contact Pa 
evenings I el 539-1 



?*r 



PrsagisasTtcy TootJucj 



PREGNANT? 




Pregnane j 
resting ( enter 

539-3338 

•I ■ ,■' II iii- 
li ---Mir 

■I' t.l)i\ 1 1 itlls.1 Mli.ll 
• i 

lllN 

•< ,il! i'i> iiiins'tii 

I In ... 




NISSAN- DATSUN Repair 
Service. 22 year* ex- 
perience. Mazdaa. Hon- 
das and Toyotas also. 
Auto Craft, 2612 Dipper 
Lane, Manhattan, Kan- 



sas. 537-6049. Ba.m,- 

5pm Mon .- Fri. 



INTERNATIONAL STUD- 
ENTS: OV-1 Greencard 
Program. Sponsored 
by U.S. Immigration. 
Grasncards provide 
U.S. permanent real- 
den I status Citicena of 
almost all countries are 
allowed. For Informa- 
tion and forma: New 
Era Legal Services, 
20231 Stagg St., Cano- 
ga Park, CA 91306. Tel: 
{818)772-7168; 
<818I99S-442S. Mon - 
Sun.: 10a.m.- 11p.m. 



LITTLE APPLE Driving 
School. Laarn to drive 
538-4881. 

PROMPT CONTRACEPTIVE 

and abortion service*. 
Dale L. Clinton, M.D., 
Lawrence, 
1913)841-5716 



Insuranc* 



HEALTH AND Auto cov- 
erage Call u* before 

purchasing The Uni- 
ver*rty Health Plan. Tim 
L. Engle Agency 3528 
Kimball Ave. (Candle- 
wood Shopping Cen- 
ter! 537-4661 KSU 
grad 1988 



300 



EMPLOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 



3101 



Tli* Collegian cannot 

verify the financial po 
lentlal of advertise- 
ment* In the Employ- 
ment/Career classifica- 
tion. Readers ere ad- 
vlaed to approach any 
such employment op- 
portunity with reason 
able caution. The Col- 
legian urges our read- 
ers to contact the Bet- 
tar Business Bureau, 
801 BE Jefferson. To 
pake, KB 86607-1190 
1913)232-0454 



Dairq 
Queen 



brazisr 

HtLPWANTED 

Now Kceptmf applmlnnt 

for ful In me or fun nmc 

for ipnitf and summer 

Call T7MI17 

fix imervw* jppunlmtnL 

Ask for Mr. Fryt 

I9ISN. 3rd 



— 



1BSB CALENDAR Con 
taat. Send photo* to 
P.O. Box 491, Manhat- 
tan, KS 68502 or call 
778-5649 

AEROBICS- EARN money, 
while you exercise. In- 
structor training 
course- April 23 and 
30, 1994. (8161561 8933 

ALASKA BUMMER EM- 
PLOYMENT- fisher- 
lea. Many asm S2000 

filus/ month in csnner- 
as or 83000- 86000 
plus/ month on fishing 
vessels. For informa- 
tion call: 12061545-4155 
ext. A5768 

AN EXCELLENT career op- 
portunity exists in 
northeast Kansas for a 
herdsman in our breed- 
ing facility Our 1500 
sow farrow to finish 
unit Is totally confined 
and utilizes the latest 
technology We are 
loosing for self -motivat- 
ed, responsible team 
players who enjoy and 
respect animals and are 
looking for job security. 
It you have an animal 
science dagrae or farm 
background you may 
be just the person we 
are looking for. Experi- 
ence with Artificial In 
as mi nation would also 
be helpful. Salary with 
sick leave, paid vaca- 
tion and insurance- 
Send resume to: Agri- 
Businees, Rt. 2, Box 97, 
Washington, Kansas 
66968 

APARTMENT MAIN- 

TENANCE carpentry 
and painting experi- 
ence required, full-time 
in summsr part-lime 
during school 

537-4900 

ARGANBRIGHT HAR- 
VESTING. Wanted, 
clean cut person for 94 

hsrvest run. Best equip 
ment end pay mid- May 
through mid-Aug. 
Thed, 1-363-2737 



ATTENTION GREEKS: 126- 
year- old firm has 20 
spots available for sum- 
mer work. Make excel- 
lent career contacts for 
future job searchaa. 
Over 11,500 per month, 
real world experience. 
For Information call 1 
600 840 2840 

ATTENTION: STUDENTS 
Full-time aummer em- 
ployment, 40- 50 hours 
per weak. Must be 18 
years snd have two 
I.D.'s (drivers, S.S. Or 
State I.O.I. Drivers, 
packers, and helper* 
needed. Apply in per- 
son, Coleman Ameri- 
can Moving Services 
-815 S, 11th In Manhat- 
tan. 

CAMP COUNSELORS 
wantad for private 
Michigan boys/ girls 
summer camps. Teach: 
Swimming, canoeing, 
sailing, waterakiing, 
gymnaatics, rlflery, 
archery, tennis, golf, 
sports, computers, 
camping, crafts, 

dramatic*, or riding. 
Also kitchen, office, 
maintenance. Salary 
(1)50 or mora plus 
R&B. Camp LWC/GWC, 
1765 Maple. Northfield, 
IL 60093. 1706)446-2444. 

COMPUTER NETWORK 
Adminislrstor Aaals- 



ent position, mostly 
regularly scheduled 
hours with limited 
smergsney trou- 

bleshooting hour*. Ass- 
ists in overseeing 
55-computer Macin- 
tosh network, including 
troubleshooting, hard- 
ware maintenance, soft- 
ware backups, and 
records maintenance. 
Should be familiar with 
Macintosh operating 
systems 6 and 7 and 
good ( 
edge of 
tosh software Network 
experience with I oca I - 
talk and athernet pre- 
ferred. Basic hardware 
end software trou- 
bleshooting skills need- 
ed. Minimum wage Po- 
sition to start early Au- 
gust. Pick up applica- 
tion at 113 Kediie. Ap- 
plication deadline is 
3pm on Frl., April 

ti, ir- 



have good genera 
knowledge of Macin 



CRUISE UNE entry level on 
board and Isndside po- 
sitions available. Sum- 
msr or year round, 
great benefits, free trav- 
el. (813)229-5478 (Flori- 
dal. 

CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIR- 
ING- Earn up to 82,000 
plus/ month working on 
Cruise Ships or Land- 
Tour companies. World 
travel. Summer end 
Full-time employment 
available No experi- 
ence necessary. For 
mors information call 1- 
206-634 0468 exl C576B 

DELIVERY DRIVERS want 
* ed for tha KC Metro 
Area. Put your vehicla 
to work for you. Full 
lime days, great sum- 
mer job Call Quick De- 
livery (913)888-8627. 

EARN OVER S100/ hour 
processing our mall at 
home. For information 
Call (2021310-9958. 

HARVEST HELP wantad. 
Need combine and 
truck drivers for sum- 
msr wheal hsrvest. 
Board, room, and good 
pay. Homa before 
achool stsrta 

(911)677-2094 

HELP WANTED- INSPEC- 
TOR of wood utility pot**. 
Will train. Requires a 
lot of walking along util 
ity lines in rural Hutchi 
son area. Approximate- 
ly three months work. 
Start in May. 17/ hour 
after training. Phone 
1303)482-6550 for addi- 
tions! information and 
application. 

HELP WANTED for custom 
harvest combine op- 
erators and truck driv- 
ers Experience pre- 
ferred. Call 
(3031483-7490 evenings. 

INTERNATIONAL EM 
PLOYMCNT- Make up 

to $2000- 540000 plus/ 
month teaching basic 
conversational English 
in Japan, Taiwan, or S. 
Korea. No teaching 
background or Asian 
languages required. For 
information call: 

(2061632-1 146 
axt.J6768 

LABORERS NEEDED for 

construction work. 
Start immediately Call 
(9131841-6347. 

LABORERS NEEDEO. Land- 
scape and retaining 
wall experience ra- 

Suired. Start imma- 
lately. call 

(913)841-634? 

NANNIES WANTED- Posi- 
tions nationwide, sum- 
mer or year round, ex- 
perience not required. 
Great pay and benefits. 
free travel. 

(612)643-4399. 

NEWSPAPER ADVEft- 

TISINO BALES Mont- 
gomery Publications 
ha* an opening for an 
advertising sales repre- 



ADVERTISING PRODUCTION 



Publication Practice 
|MC 360 

Get training and gain experience while earning one hour of 
credit this fall. Attend class one day a week from 8:30 a.m.- 
1 1 :30 a.m. The day of the week is your choice based on 
availability. Only two positions left so sign up early. The 
instructor's permission is required. 

The experience you earn in the fall would qualify you to apply 
for a paid position in the spring. 

vo «**V/^ 



«j<. 



% 



B a.m. -3 p.m. 
for more information and syllabus 



sentetiv* to service ac- 
counts in our multi-pub- 
lication area. Mult be 
responsible, wall- or 
ganlied sslf- stsrter 
who csn produce re- 
sults with minimal su- 
pervision. Previous 
madia sates experience 
preferred Base aslarv 
plua commission and 
mileage allowance 
Send reeume IN COfS- 
FIOINCS to Daily 
Union, P.O. Box 129, 
Junction City. Kama* 
68441 or nil out applica- 
tion at 222 West 6th 
Street. 

NON-SMOKING DAYCARE 
provider wsnted for 
two kids ages 2 and S. 
Part-time or full-time 
776-0691. 

PART-TIME DRAFTSMAN 
needed for residential 
construction. 539-6640. 

PART-TIME HELP wantad. 
Little Ceasars Piiza. 
Morning and evening 
shifta. Competitive 
wages for cook and 
cashier position*. 
Apply In person, con- 
tact Nikki. 639-3333. 

PART-TIME MAIN 

TE NANCE person need- 
ed May IS for 60 span 
rnents, basic plumbing, 
electrical, and carpen- 
try ekills needed. Re- 
spond to PO Sox 1286 
Manhattan 

PRE SCMOOL-QU AUTY 
program ha* opening for 
1994 96 achool year. 
Teacher position Monday 
Friday mornings Degree 
and early childhood ex 
parlance required. 
Send reeume and refer- 
ence* to Education Di- 
rector, 121 N. Sixth, by 
April 18 776-6626. 

PRE SCHOOL— QUALITY 
PROGRAM ha* open- 
ing for 1994 95 school 

year. Assistant teacher 
position Tuesday/Thurs- 
day mornings. Sand re- 
sume/ references to Ed- 
ucation Director, 121 N. 
Sixth, by April 16. 776- 
6625. 

RILEY COUNTY has an as 
needed part-time 112- 
18 hours/ weak! posi- 
tion to work with PC us- 
ers, could bs full-time 
summer. Requires PC 
knowledge with DOS. 
Windows, help desk 
snd database develop 
ment experience. De- 
sire experience with the 
following applications. 
Word, Excel, Lotus, 
Ouettro Pro, and Word- 
Perfect Pay ia $6.17/ 
hour. Apply at Person- 
nel and Information 
Systems, 110 Court- 
house Plaia. third floor, 
through April 18, 1994 
EEOE. 

STUDENT CONSULTANT: 
Experience with both 
Meinframe and Micro- 
computers, along with 
GPA will he selection 
criteria. Undergradu- 
ates with employment 
potential of two years 
given preference. Con- 
tact: Joyce in Room 16 
Nichols Hall, by 5pm 
Mon April IB, 1994. No 
phone calls. 

STUDENT OFFICE manag 
er needed at K- State lo 
cation. Approximately 
IS flexible hours par 
week and approximate 
ly SS00/ month. Job be 
gins now, break* for 
summer, and resumes 
when school starts. 
Business background 
NOT required. Crest 

tob for buay student. 
: or more information 
see 'Jon's Notes' card 
on the Job Board in the 
Union. Apply as soon 
as possible 

SUMMER EMPLOY- 

MENT. Experienced 
Combine or Truck 
Drivers needed for 
custom wheat har 
vesting operation. 
Motel and Maala in 
eluded. Wages based 
on experience. Work 
from May 20 thru Au 
gust 15, 1994 From 
Texee to Montana 
Lancaster Harvesting, 
Dodge City, Kansas 
Call Now (3161227-6821 

SUMMER WORK available 
at KSU Vegetable Re- 
search Farm. OaSoto 
(Kansas City area). 86/ 
hour/ 40 hour* par 
weak. Must have own 
trensportslion to the 
farm. Contact Dr. Cha- 
rles Marr, Horticulture, 
Waters Hall 632-6170 
or Christy Nagel I same) 
for more information 

SUMMER WORK. S47Q par 
weak average. Good 

track record needed 
Call 1 800 840 2840 

THE CITY of Manhattan. 
Kansas ha* two posi- 
tion* available for Crew 
Leaders to supervise 
youth work crews In a 
variety of parks related 
activities. Salary: S5-50-- 
S6. Cell Terry OeWeese 
at 587-2767. 

THE CITY of Westmore- 
land it accepting appli 
cationa lo fill (ha posi- 
tion of pool manager 
WSI certification re- 
quired for further in- 
formation call 
1-457-3361 or request 
an application from 
City Hall 202 Main St. 
Weetmoreland 

TRAVEL FROM Texas to 
Montana on a profes- 
sions I wheat harvesting 
craw. Guaranteed 
monthly wage, bonus, 
room and board, Cali 
19131567 4649 

VARNEY'S BOOK Store Is 
now taking applications 
for TEMPORARY 

PART-TIME and TEM- 
PORARY FULL-TIME 
position* In the text- 
book department to 
assist with textbook 
buyback. Possible em- 
ployment dsle* are 
April 26 through May 
13 84,30 per hour. In 
volves helping custom 
art, moderate lifting 
and cleaning/ pricing 
book* All positions re- 
quire diligence and a 
pleasant, service-orient- 
ed attitude. College ex 
perience Is strongly pre 



ferred. Apply in person 
downstairs at Varney's 
Book Store. 623 N. 
Manhattan Ave , Man- 
hattan, KS. Deadline for 
applications Is Fri., 
April 15 

VISTA DRIVE-IN is now hir- 
ing for full or part-time 
help. Flexible hour* 
available. Apply in par- 
ton 191 1 Tuttla Creek 
Blvd. or 2700 Anderton 
Ave. 

WANTED HARVEST 

HELP Run three 1994 
Case international com 
bines. Three 1991 
Chevy Kodiak automat- 
ic twin screw trucks. 
Pay is S1 000- $1200 a 
month room and board 
is provided. Need CDL 
drivers licence. We will 
help obtain CDL over 
Spring Break. Prefer 
non-smokers, 
non-drlnkars and no 
drug user* Gaines Har- 
vesting (913W89-4660 

WEATHER OBSERVER 
needed for the Weather 
Oats Library. Must bs 
available 7- Sam and 7- 
8pm year- tound Includ- 
ing some weekends 
and holidayt. IS- 30 
hours/ week. Preference 
given to undergrade 
ataa with two years 
availability. Applies 
tiona in 21 1 Umberger 
Hall. 

WORK-STUDY STUDENT 
for F94 semester, 15- 
20 hours/ wsak. Regis 
trar'a Office. Contract 
Evelyn Larson at 
532 6254 for Informa- 
tion. 



Buslnoss 
Opp«>tiunltta>B 

The Collegian cannot 
verity the financial po- 
tential of advertise 
ment* in tha Employ- 
ment/Career cleselflca* 
tlon. Reader* are ad- 
vised to approach any 
such business oppor- 
tunity with reasonable 
caution. The Collegian 
urges our readers to 
contact tha Bettor Busi- 
ness Bureau, 801 BE 
Jefferson, Topeka. KB 
66607 1 190 
19131232-0464. 

ATTENTION STUOENTS: 
Earn extra cash stuffing 
envelopes at home. Ail 
materials provided. 
Send SASE to Midwest 
Mailers P.O. Box 395. 
Olathe. KS 66051, Im 
mediate Response. 

400 



OPEN 
MARKET 



W«rrts>d to Buy 

AUQHI VIDEO GAMES 

Buy- sell- trade. Ninten- 
do- Sega- ell systems. 
Game Guy 537-0989 
709 N. Twelfth, Ag- 
gieville- 

4101 



♦♦♦♦ ♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦a)*) 



; : Thigh Cream I ! 

'25 

Manhattan Weight 

Loss Clinic 

217 Southwlnd 

t aaao V o ^i eaaa t 



1977 HONDA Expreas mo- 
torbike, $350; three 
speed men's bicycle. 
S40, 10- speed wom- 
en's bicycle, S7S. Call 
539-3738. 

DO YOU want to gat rid of 
cellulite? Rolls of fat? 
Thoae dreaded areas 
that never go away no 
matter how much you 
diet or exerciee? Sci- 
ence now tells us there 
is something we can do 
about those problem ar- 
eas, and I have the pro- 
duct that will do just 
that- and it coma* with 
a 100 percent Guaran- 
tee! Call Cheryl 
776-5293 day, 776-7669 
evening, 

FOR SALE Mender 110. mi 
crowave $40. entertain 
ment center $60, end ta- 
bles $5, grill $10, dress- 
er S15, stereo cabinet 
S10. 539-2228. 

PIONEER CAR cassette re- 
ceiver, JS 21* car equal 
iter/ amplifier and 
Pioneer stereo speak- 
ers. 537-9344. 

SAMYANG ZOOM lens 
with Macro. 80 300mm 
Used twice, works 
great. Need money. 
$100 or bast offer, Lau- 
rie 587-0598 



Furniture) to 
ssuy/Seril 

COUCH, TWO chairs, cof 

fee labia, matching eel, 
western style, $100 539 
2866, leave message. 

MUST SELL fasti Moving 
on April 16. 1994; 
Chslr, 820; rocking 
chair, 810; kitchen table 
with chairs. 820; queen 
water bed. $175; book 
case, 160. 537-4373. 



Sporting 
Bqulpftfttt 



Bqulpmofit 



NEW PORTABLE CD play- 
er. Magnevox with car 
adaptara. Chrla 

776-1814 



Tfckotsto 
e»uy/e>a)H 



BROOKS- DUNN TICKETS. 
537-3764 Chris, or 
leave message 

BROOKS ANO Sunn tick- 
ets for sale, 537-7096. 

TWO BROOKS and Dunn 
tickets. Section eight, 
chair back*, better than 
average seats Cali 539 
1582 



5(1) 



TRANS- 
PORTATION 



Biol 



1977 BLAZER four-wheel 
drive, rally wheels, new 
tires. 19S9 Chevy 
school bus, excellent 
shape, runs good. 1955 
Chevy big window pick 
up 1937 1 1/2 Ion 
Chevy truck. 1959 
Chevy short wide bed, 
fleetsid* with Nova sub 
frame Cell 537 9287 
after 5:30 p.m or lesvs 



1984 MITSUBISHI Turbo, 
115K miles, 81400. 
two-door, power wind- 
ows, new brakes, tires, 
battery, alternator, air, 
stereo. Cell 539-3588/ 
53B-8164. 

1996 RENAULT Alliance. 
Red four-door. 108K 
miles. Very clean, runs, 
could use engine work. 
$500 or best offer, Lau- 
rie 587-0598. 

1989 PONT) AC LeMena LE 
67K. excellent condi- 
tion, 40mpg, new 
clutch and tire* $2600. 
539-2628, moving must 
sell. 

FOR SALE: 1992 Mazda 
Protege LX Five speed, 
9,100 miles, power 
windows, locks, mag 
wheels, excellent condi- 
tion. 59.150 Call 532 
2832 

8201 



Blcycli 



1992 SPECIALIZED Stump- 
jumper Silver/ gray, oil- 
air front shock, Coda 
bar- ends. Clean, excel- 
lent condition. S685 
S39-0935 leave mes- 
sage for Kevin. 



5301 



Motofcycloo 



1982 SUZUKI CS750T, 
runs excellent, new 
rear tire, very good con 
dition. $1200 or best off 
er. 776 7850. aak for 
Chris. 

1986 NINJA 600R, good, 
sound bike, brand new 
tires, brakes, battery. 
No mechanical prob 
lams. Soma cosmetic 
flaws, $1800 776-2099. 

1986 YAMAHA Radian, 
red. Excellent mileage, 
under 3000 miles, very 
good condition, like 
new. Must tee at 1838 
Anderson or call Rod 
539-2625. 

1988 HONDA Hawk GT: Ex- 
cellent mileage, under 
6,000 mile*, bought 
new in 1991. S37- 3295 

1990 HONDA CBR 500F. 
new tires, front fork 
seal*, will show m Man- 
hattan. Call John 
(9131263-3431 



TENT TWO-PERSON Cole- 
man mountaineer II. 
$100 or best offer. Chris 
776-1814 




A O Wednesday. April 13, 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Proposal still in air 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

Schapaugh said. 

The general education propos- 
al will require students to take 18 
hours in specially designed gener- 
al-education courses outside their 
majors. The proposal does not 
state that any additional credit 
requirements for graduation 
would be added. 

If the proposal is passed, new 
courses will be developed, others 
would be modified, and courses 
will be adapted to accommodate 
the focus of general education. 

Provost James Coffman has 
proposed an amount of $250,000 
to get the project moving. 



"These funds would be for 
start-up costs," Schapaugh said. 

"But to be honest, I don't 
know if that will be enough." 

If Faculty Senate can pass the 
proposal in May, work could 
begin on track one this summer. 
Track one emphasizes the modifi- 
cation of courses/experiences for 
general education. 

Schapaugh said the modified 
proposal has full support from the 
academic affairs committee and 
the Student Senate. 

An exact date for the next 
Faculty Senate meeting before the 
scheduled May meeting was not 
set. 



Committee inconsistent in handling late reports 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

they were disqualified until 
Monday morning. 

"The speech learn met over in 
Nichols Hall. We picked up a 
newspaper, and it said we had been 
disqualified." Moore said. 

Adams said they had left the 
expenditure report in the hands of 
their staff. He said there was a mis- 
communication within his cabinet. 

"1 want to explain myself to the 
student body," Adams said. "I don't 
want people to think because we 
are a sophomore and freshman that 
we entered this election on a whim. 
That's not the case. We have been 
serious from the get go. 

"I am responsible," Adams said. 



" I hope we won't have any prob- 
lems again." 

Moore said she felt the action of 
the committee was too harsh. 

"How often are presidential can- 
didates booted out of the election?" 
Moore said. 

She also said the committee has 
not been consistent in the way it 
has dealt with late expenditure 
reports. 

The deadline for the reports was 
5 p.m. April 8. Two candidates that 
turned their reports in before 
Sunday evening were allowed to 
remain on the ballot but were 
required to find people to work at 
the polls. 

Two other candidates were taken 



off the ballot but allowed to run as 
write-in candidates. 

Another two candidates were 
contacted and allowed to be present 
at a hearing on their violations, but 
they were disqualified from the 
campaign. 

Ten more candidates were dis- 
qualified but never appeared before 
the committee for a hearing on their 
expenditure violations. 

The committee members argued 
some of the reports were later than 
others and deserved different con- 
sideration. 

Kara Rogers, Election 
Committee member, said the com- 
mittee interrupted the regulations to 
mean candidates that don't flic 



Voting instructions incorrect 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

Senate Operations Committee, said 
that around 1 2:30 p.m. he and Trent 
LeDoux, Student Senate intern, 
noticed that the instructions for vot- 
ing for one-term UGB candidates 
were inaccurate. 

There are four seats open for 
one-term offices, but the ballot 
instructed voters to vote for one 
seat. 

Ed Skoog, student body presi- 
dent, said all the ballots cast before 
1 1 a.m. were pulled out and set 
aside. 

However, the Elections 
Committee was concerned that 
some students contacted would not 
be able to recast their ballots. So the 
committee decided to reschedule 
the UGB vote. 

Another student was not happy 
with her treatment by the Election 
Committee. 

Brenda Halinski, graduate stu- 
dent in counseling education, 
arrived on campus Tuesday morn- 
ing expecting to find her name on 
the ballot. 

She found that both she and 
another candidate for graduate 
school senator had been dropped. 

Halinski said because she lives 
in Wamego, she could not make it 
to the first mandatory meeting. 

She said Bailey only contacted 
her once, through her answering 
machine, about attending another 
meeting. 

Halinski said she called the 
Office for Student Activities and 
Services and left a message that she 
couldn't make the meeting because 
she wouldn't be in town until 
Tuesday, the day of the election. 

"Someone there told me it was 
fine because I had been on Student 
Senate before," she said. 

Besides missing the meetings, 
Halinski failed to turn in a candi- 
date expenditure report. 

"I didn't even think about it 
because 1 didn't do anything," she 
said. 

Even though Halinski said she 
was responsible for knowing the 
guidelines for expenditure reports, 
she said Bailey said nothing about it 
when she called about the second 
meeting. 

Halinski also was not notified 
Sunday or Monday that she had 
been disqualified from the election, 
she said. 

"I was surprised that my name 
wasn't on the ballot, especially 
since I read in the Collegian that all 
three graduate student senators 
would be on the ballot," Halinski 
said. "But there was only one out of 
three." 

Bailey told Halinski that she 
could make an appeal to the tribunal 
Tuesday night. However, Nolfi said 
that, though she would have liked 



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Friday, April 15, 1994 

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the tribunal to meet the night of the 
election, a quorum of five members 
could not get together until 
Thursday, April 14. 

Halinski said she was undecided 
about appealing her disqualification 
because of the possibility of a new 
election being called for. 

"It's really not worth it," she 
said. "The money comes from the 
students. 1 didn't really want to risk 
having another election. 

"1 don't want to cause more 
expenses to students." 



J- 
)• 
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J- 
)> 
!< 
)■ 

t TTuitSffliiy, Aprfl] 13 & WoMmMdliiy, AipirflQ 113 \ 



t 
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i 
c 



REMEMBER TO VOTE! 



President, Vice President, 
Board of Student Publications, Fine Arts Council, j ■ 

• £ A 3 ■ 

Union Governing Board, A * 

• ( ""'PJ Student Senators p^ 3 

J \ 1st floor Union 7:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. 

Vet. Med. Trotter Hall 11:30 a.m.-l :30 p.m. \ 
(In front of cafeteria) ; 

\ > ¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ < \ 



Ol'l S! IONS, 



expenditure reports are automatical- 
ly disqualified. 

Tonya Foster also filed an 
appeal with the tribunal. She said 
she felt the committee did not han- 
dle people who turned in expendi- 
ture reports late consistently. 

Poster said some people had 
been out of town and did not have 
time to be present at hearings on 
the expenditure violations. 

"They weren't consistent," 
Foster said. "The main problem 
was there were discrepancies. They 
need to be resolved. 

"Future elections need to be 
cleaned up. They desperately need 
to be cleaned up." 



( .r.ul St hool ? 



Graduate School 

HoiiiKilionul Seminar 



llnirsclii). April I 4 
4:30 p.m. 
Union 206 



,S \mluiwittl 




Ag Senator 



wm 



Let's make a difference together!" 

Paid for by the committee to elgct Shannon Alford., 



The K-State Alumni Association is now 
accepting applications for three at- 

large positions for the 

All University* 
Homecoitj})g 
Committee *A 



Applications may be picked up in 
2323 Anderson Ave., Su 
Application deadline is Monday, April 1 



& 



mni Office, 



4k 



VtrVll keep your foot a tappln* 




The K-State Singers 
SpringShow ^94 

Thursday, April 14 and Saturday, April 16 

McCain Auditorium 8 p.m. 

Tickets available from the McCain Box Office, 532-6428 




Native American Heritage Month 

Guest Speaker 

Martha Kreipe de Montano 

Manager, Resource Center of the National Museum of 
the American Indian/Smithsonian Institution 

The New National Museum of the 
American Indian: Its History, 

Friday, April 15 
Union 212, 11:30 a.m. 





with the Collegian. 



N ow you can pick up your 

Collegian day or night. Stop by 

Bluemont, Calvin, Dudand, 

Faiichild, Justin or Seaton Halls 

before your night class for the latest 

edition of the Collegian. 



KANSAS STATE 

QLLEGIAN 




• <m*I of Ik* Union) 



SM-4M0 



9 9+ * * 




WhdotWjctoi 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN WEEKLY SPORTS SECTION 



APRIL 13, 1994 



Green's fiery spirit 
denotes track life 



Coikfiw 

Nicole Green is noi mean. 
She only runs that way. 

Green's competitive fire 
transcends all friendships, 
but she said she is not a self- 
centered person — she's just 
misunderstood. 

"I guess I just don't 
socialize with new people 
much." Green said. "Most 
people don't really know me 
off the track." 

New acquaintances do 
make her somewhat uneasy, 
but after time, an open and 
confident person speaks. 

Green has one ultimate 
goal: to compete in the 1996 
Olympic Games in Atlanta. 

"All I have to do is keep 
competing well and training 
well." Green said. "There's 
no rush. I know 1 can It's 
just a matter of time." 

At the end of her 
sophomore season. Green's 
best outdoor time in the 400 
meters was 55.0 seconds. 

Last season, she cut 
nearly two seconds off her 
time, covering the distance 
in 53.5 and qualifying for the 
Outdoor Championships. 

This season. Green earned 
ail-American status at the 
Indoor championships at the 
Hoosier Dome in Indiana- 
polis. 

Green owned one of the 
top five times in the country, 
entering the meet with 55.0 
seconds. However, she 
settled for ninth place, good 
enough for the nil-American 
recognition. 

"Nikki has an absolute 
world of talent," Coach Cliff 
Rovelto said. "I think she is 
capable of being among the 
top five quarter milers in 
college and maybe even the 
rest of the nation, too," 

Green, a native of 
Springfield. Ohio, said her 
success can be attributed to a 
series of learning experi- 
ences she has endured. 

"I learned by experien- 
cing," Green said. "I made 
some bad choices along the 



way, but 1 learned from 
them." 

The teacher she said she 
learned the most from is 
Rovelto. 

During her sophomore 
year. Green said she came 
close to hanging up her 
spikes and quitting track 
altogether, but it was 
Rovelto who pushed her and 
kept her encouraged. 

Green pulled her 
hamstring that season and 
the coach who convinced her 
to come to K-State, Daryl 
Anderson, left. 

"It was a bad year. I 
wanted to quit," Green said. 
"Coach Rovelto was the only 
person that pushed me." 

Rovelto said he has had 
several heart-to-heart dis- 
cussions with Green. 

"1 tried to get through to 
her to not measure herself 
against her teammates or her 
classmates, but by her own 
potential," Rovelto said. 

Rovelto said he tried to 
make her understand the 
importance of her classes as 
well as track. 

"She is making enormous 
strides, not just in track and 
field, but in the classroom as 
well." Rovelto said. 

The entire team. Green 
said, refers to Rovelto as 
"Pops," because of his 
fatherly advice. 

"Coach Rovelto is a nice 
guy and really understand- 
ing," Green said. 

Green majors in 
sociology. After graduation, 
she plans to keep training for 
a shot at the Olympics and 
also get out into the 
community and help 
underprivileged families. 

"I want to show some of 
less fortunate people, 
especially minorities, that 
they have opportunities," 
Green said. "No one ever 
really showed me, but I was 
lucky enough to be good at 
track." 

It's true. Green is not an 
unrelenting person — she 
only runs that way. 




Nicole Green, 

pictured at th* 
toft, runs tha 200 
and 400 mator for 
tha K-State 
outdoor track 
taam. Graan 
earned all- 
Amarican status 
at the Indoor 
NCAA 

championships 
earlier this year. 

WWTU 

CoH»gUn 



Successor 
to Altman 
remains 
unknown 



MftjjN 

K-Siaie's two-week search for a 
men's basketball coach hasn't 
produced any results yet. 

Tulsa's Tubby Smith, the first 
choice for the vacancy, turned the 
Wildcats down last Friday for a 
five-year deal with the Golden 
Hurricane. 

Smith cited family reasons as a 
key to his preference of remaining 
in Tulsa. 

As of midnight Monday, the 
Wildcat Watch deadline, no 
decision had been reached on 
former Coach Dana Altman 's 
replacement. 

Asked whether a decision 
would be reached a few days from 
Monday, Athletic Director Max 
Urick said no. 

"It's been an ongoing process," 
he said Monday. 

"It's unpredictable on how 
things are going to develope." 

The advisory committee spent 
Sunday interviewing Pepperdine 
coach Tom Asbury. Other 
candidates include Ohio coach 
Larry Hunter and Duke assistant 
coach Mike Brey. 

"The list is there, and it seems 
like it has shortened, then grown, 
then shortened again," Urick said. 

"Each candidate brings his own 
strengths and weaknesses." 

One candidtate has officially 
been eliminated from the race, 
Urick said Washburn coach Bob 
Chipman's lack of experience at 
the Division- 1 level was a factor. 

K-State officials wanted to 
reach a verdict by 8 a.m. Monday, 
but with Smith's refusal, they were 
forced to prolong the search. 

The spring signing period 
begins on Wednesday. 

Most advisory committee 
members, who have been meeting 
since Monday, April 4, were not 
allowed to comment on candidates 
for the job and referred all 
questions to Urick. 




Jones puts on show 
for professional scouts 



Jones 



eCOTT 

Collegian 

K-State senior Askia Jones may 
have solidified his chances of being 
selected in the upcoming NBA draft 
with a MVP performance last 
Saturday in the championship game of 
the Portsmouth (Va.) Invitational 



Tournament. 

In an exhibition reminiscent of his 
62-point explosion against Fresno 
State in the National Invitation 
Tournament last month, the long- 
range marksman funneled in a game- 
high 30 points. 

The invitational, which is an 



annual all-star game for collegiate 
seniors, was played in front of talent 
scouts from NBA clubs and was 
televised nationally on ESPN last 
Saturday. 

Historically, the Portsmouth 
Invitational has been a proving 
ground for players currently not 
considered first-round draft picks by 
the NBA, or players from small 
colleges who haven't had a chance to 
demonstrate their talents in a national 
spotlight. 

Other players who got their 
professional start in the Portsmouth 



Invitational include current NBA All- 
Stars Scottie Pippin, Dennis Rodman 
and John Stockton. 

Jones hit 27 in a quick, second- half 
outburst during last Saturday's game, 
including an eight-for-eight mark 
from three -point range, to break open 
a one-point game and lead the White 
squad to a 1 10-99 victory over the 
Blue team. 

His long-range bombs, some as far 
out as 30 feet, drew rave reviews from 
the ESPN announcing crew. 

Jones recently participated in the 
NCAA Final Four three-point contest 



in Charlotte, N.C., and said during a 
post-game interview that after a slow 
start due to fatigue, he finally got on 
track. 

"When I came here to play, 1 was a 
little out of shape," Jones said. 

"But the team sacrificed some 
shots, looked for me and gave me 
some good screens." 

K-State teammate Anthony Beane 
also played in the championship as a 
point guard for the losing Blue squad. 

Beane scored seven points, but he 
ended the game with two late 
turnovers. 



1994 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 



Sept 3 SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA 

Sept 17 RICE 

Sept 24 MINNESOTA 

Oct. 6 at Kansas (ESPN) 

Oct 15 NEBRASKA 

Oct. 22 at Colorado 

Oct. 29 at Oklahoma 

Nov. 5 IOWA STATE 

Nov. 12 

Nov. 19 ^JKLAHOHAiTATE 




FOOTBALL 



Expectations set high for Wildcats 




ESULTS(9-2-1/4.2-1| 

NEW MEXICO STATE W 34-10 

STERN KENTUCKY W 38-13 



rtesota.. 



lebraska 

COLORADO.. 
OKLAHOMA.. 



W 30-25 

W 38-20 

W 104 

L 2845 

T 16-16 

W 21-T 



at Iowa State „„L 23-27 

MISSOURI, „._ W 31-21 

at Oklahoma State. W 21 -1 7 

Wyoming (Copper Bowl) W 52-17 



STEPHANIE FUOUA/CoM»gl«#i 



Cotklian 

What will the K-State football team do 
for an encore this fall? 

After finishing the 1993 campaign 
ranked in the top 20 and winning a bowl 
game for the first time ever, the Wildcats 
are certainly optimistic about the season to 
come. 

"I'm excited because this is my first 
spring where we really know what we are 
doing," running back J.J. Smith said. 
"There isn't as much coaching as there was 
last spring. It seems like we just took the 
pads off." 

Smith was the only player in the Big 
Eight Conference last season to rush for 
700 yards and have more than 200 yards 
receiving. He rushed for 748 yards, had 
247 reception yards and was third in the 
league in scoring with 72 points. 

"Our goal is to get to the Orange Bowl. 
I think it is really possible. We have a tot 
of talent out here." 

The Cats went back to the field Monday 
to start spring practice, which will 
culminate with an intrasquad scrimmage 
April 30 at KSU Stadium. 

But with K-State's accomplishments 
last year, Coach Bill Snyder doesn't want 
his team to dismiss what led to that 



success. 

"We're awfully careful not to approach 
it differently," Snyder said. "Differently in 
the respect that it is important for us not to 
take anything for granted. We still have to 
do the little things. We still have to have 
every bit as much discipline as we've 
attempted to have in the past. All the 
intrinsic things still have to be in place. 

"We have to realize we're not, by no 
stretch of the imagination, an empire. But 
we understand how they have fallen. It 
happens from within. It's important for us 
to be every bit as demanding and expect 
just as much as we always have." 

The Cats landed at No. 18 in the USA 
Today/CNN Poll and No. 20 in the 
Associated Press Poll. Including the final 
poll, the Wildcats were ranked in the top 
25 of the coaches poll for 10 weeks of the 
season. 

K-State topped its stellar 9-2- 1 season, 
the second best mark in school history, 
with a 52-17 rout of Wyoming in the 
Weiser Lock Copper Bowl. 

Snyder said some of the effects of the 
Dec. 29 bowl game have transferred to 
spring drills. 

"We have just put ourselves ahead in the 
spring," said Snyder, who has compiled a 
27-28-1 record at K-Statc. "I think our 



players feel we just finished practice. 
Consequently, they have retained so much 
more." 

One area of concern for the Cats will be 
the loss of four senior starters in the 
secondary — Thomas Randolph, Kenny 
McEntyre, Jaime Mendez and Kitt 
Rawlings. 

"Defensively, the obvious thing is the 
fact that we lost so many people in our 
secondary. I think we have a good group of 
young people to choose from." 

The Wildcats return eight secondary 
members from last year's squad, but none 
have seen substantial playing time. 

"They are, for the most part, very 
inexperienced youngsters," Snyder said. 
"But there is some talent there." 

K-State will bring back 97.9 percent of 
its rushing yards, 100 percent of its passing 
yards. 60.3 percent of its receiving yards, 
58.3 percent of its scoring and 61.1 percent 
of its tackling. 

The Wildcats will return seven offensive 
starters, including first-team all-Big Eight 
quarterback Chad May. May passed for 
2,682 yards last year, breaking a school 
record and setting the third-highest total in 
Big Eight history. 

Defensively, the Cats bring back seven 
starters. 




2 ************ April 13. 1B»4 



■Wildcat Watch- 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




Netters tumble in home finale 



Brooke Brundloe rMChM to return her opponent's shot during ■ 
match last Sunday. Tha Wildcat* lost to Iowa Slate, 7-2. 



Colfefian 

K-Staie's tennis team dropped its last two 
home matches of the season last weekend, bat- 
tling cold and rain against Big Eight Conference 
foes. 

The netters lost Saturday to Nebraska 9-0 
while playing indoors at A he am Field House. 
Against Iowa State on Sunday, the netters faced 
temperatures in the 50s and strong winds from 
the north in their 7-2 loss at the L.P. Washburn 
Recreational Area. 

Overall, the team struggled with the weather 
conditions and was unable to use the weather as 
an advantage. 

'The weather was a factor — it made for 
some ugly tennis," Coach Steve Bietau said. "I 
don't think it hurt us, but t don't think we han- 
dled it well enough to turn it into an advantage." 
Against the Huskers, K-State started out 
strong in the doubles competition but went 
downhill from there. Martine Shrubsole and 
Nikki Lagerstrom won the first set, 6-2, in No. 1 



doubles but dropped the final two, 6-4, 7-3, to 
Nebraska's Alison McNeills and April Y arm us 

"They just overpowered us today," Bietau 
said. "I'd like to say that if we had our girls 
playing their normal positions, we could have 
won, but Nebraska was just too strong for us." 

Brooke Brundige was responsible for both of 
the netters' points against Iowa State. The junior 
defeated Ginney Linney, 7-6 (4), 6-4, in No. 4 
singles, and she then teamed with Summer 
Ruckman to beat Angie Miller and Linney, 6-2, 
4-6, 7-6 (3). in No. 2 doubles. 

For Brundige, the weather played an impor- 
tant factor in the way she had to play the match. 

"The conditions definitely had a big bearing 
on the match today. Basically, it was a mental 
game because you couldn't count on your best 
shots to go in like they would on a normal day," 
Brundige said. 

Bietau was pleased with the way Brundige 
was able to adjust to the weather in her match. 

'The thing you have to do is play with a 
higher margin of safety and make as few mis- 



takes as possible. She (Brundige) did a good job 
of that today," Bietau said. 

Lagerstrom was the only rtetter other than 
Brundige to win a set against Iowa State. 
Lagerstrom won her first set, 6-2. against Miller 
in No. 3 singles before dropping the final two 
sets, 6-4, 6-2. 

For the seventh-straight match, the Cats had 
to forfeit matches because of injuries and ill- 
ness. Once again, they defaulted on No. 5 and 
No. 6 singles and No. 3 doubles. 

The losses dropped the netters' record to 4- 
1 4 overall and I -3 in the conference. 

The Cats will travel to face the top three 
teams in the conference next week. Two of the 
top three teams are nationally ranked by the 
Intercollegiate Tennis Association and Role*. 
The netters will meet No. 5 Kansas on 
Wednesday, unranked Oklahoma State on 
Sunday and No. 31 Oklahoma next Monday. 

The netters will face these teams again April 
22 in the Big Eight Championships in 
Oklahoma City. 



K-STATE PEOPIJEi THEN / 



Former' player says Purdue reminiscent of K-State 



He's the Big Dog's keeper now, 
but he still loves the Wildcats. 

Purdue basketball coach Gene 
Keady, a K- State graduate and for- 
mer two- sport athlete for the Cats, 
gained national attention last month 
as he led his Boilermakers and the 
Dog, Glenn Robinson, to the Elite 
Eight in the NCAA Tournament. 

Keady garnered more attention 
on the K-State campus last week 
when his name was mentioned as a 
possible candidate to replace former 
coach Dana Alt man. 

In an interview last Wednesday, 
Keady himself expressed some 
interest in the position. 

"Have you guys found a basket- 
ball coach yet?" he said. 



Asked if he were looking at the 
job, Keady said, "Aw, I probably 
couldn't tike the pay cut. No. I'm 
just kidding." 

As it turned out, Keady won't be 
returning to coach at his alma mater 
anytime soon, but he still has fond 
memories of his years as a Wildcat. 

"My time at K-State was very 
enjoyable," Keady said. "All my 
professors were great, and 1 was 
just thrilled to be playing in the Big 
Eight. Being a Wildcat was a great 
experience." 

Keady, a native Kansan who 
grew up in Dighton and Lamed on 
the plains of western Kansas, spent 
his first two years at Garden City 
Community College. 

At Garden City. Keady was a 
four-sport standout, but he found 



r 



Gkni Kiady 



Then: Keady grew up in Dtghton and Lamed arc) came to K- 
State as a transfer from Garden City Community College in 
1956. He played football, basebal and ran track for the 
Wildcats. He received his degree in biological sciences and 
physical education in 1956. 

Now: Keady is now the men's basketbal coach at Purdue. 
The Boterrnakers made the Bite Bght of the NCAA 
Tournament this year, eventuaiy being eiminated by runner- 
up Duke. He has won four Big 10 Conference titles with 
Purdue. 



his greatest success in football, as 
an all- American quarterback. 

Choosing K-State in 1 956 over 
Kansas, Colorado and Air Force, 
Keady continued to be active in 
three sports. Ironically, basketball 
was not one of them. 

"Those were the years of Jack 
Parr and Bob Boozer," Keady said. 
"I went in to see Coach Tex about 
playing, but they really didn't need 
me." 

Keady did, however, find a place 
with the K-State football, track and 
baseball teams. While the Cats of 
Keady 's time didn't rule the confer- 
ence, he said just playing in 
Manhattan was exciting. 

"Oklahoma was the dominant 
team of the Big Eight at that time, 
but the very fact that I played Big 
Eight football was a big thing for 
me," Keady said. "I was thrilled to 
be getting a scholarship to play 
back then" 

Keady received a degree in bio- 
logical sciences and physical educa- 
tion in 1938. and after a brief stint 
with the Pittsburgh Steelers, he 
returned to Kansas to coach basket- 
ball at Beloit High School until 
1964. During that time, Beloit went 
to the state tournament three times 
and posted a 58-6 record. 

Throughout the summer months 
of 1962-64, Keady was back in 
Manhattan working on his master's 
in education and picking up tips 
from K-Sute coach Tex Winter. 

After leaving Beloit, Keady 



moved on to Hutchinson Com- 
munity College, where he was an 
assistant for a year before taking the 
head coaching position in 1965. In 
his nine years at Hutch. Keady post- 
ed a 187-48 record while taking his 
team to six national tournaments. 

He went on to assist at Arkansas 
with Eddie Sutton for four years as 
the Razorbacks went 94-24. As the 
head coach at Western Kentucky, 
Keady led his team to a 38-19 
record before Purdue came calling. 

"One of the main reasons I liked 
Purdue was because it reminded me 
of K-State," Keady said. "Purdue is 
very similar to K-State. It's a very 
agricultural school, and it also has a 
vet school. The people here have 
the same philosophy that they do at 
K-State, and they love and support 
all the sports." 

In his time at Purdue. Keady has 
experienced abundant success, win- 
ning four Big Ten titles, averaging 
21 wins a year and qualifying for 
the NCAA tourney 10 times. 

"It helps to have the best player 
in the nation playing for you, but 
this year's team was a team of 
unusual chemistry," Keady said. 
"I've really enjoyed coaching 
them," 

Despite Keady 's success at 
Purdue, he has received some criti- 
cism for faltering in the NCAA 
tourney, but he said he doesn't let it 
bother him. 

"I sleep well at night." he said. "I 
love my job. and I love my wife." 




Gene Keady, 
pictured at tha 
left, played 
quarterback at 
K-State from 
1956 to 1956. 
He la now tha 
man's basket- 
ball coach at 
Purdue. 



VOLLEYBALL 



Wildcats forced to start 
from scratch in search 



Collegian 

The K-State Department of 
Intercollegiate Athletics thought it 
had the perfect candidate to fill the 
vacant volleyball coach position last 
week. 

His name was Ray Bcchard, the 
Barton County Community College 
coach. 

He was offered the job by the 
athletic department, and he prompt- 
ly turned it down after a month- long 
application process. 

"We were led to believe that this 
was his dream job," senior associate 
athletic director Jim Epps said. "It's 
very disappointing." 

Now, K-State is back to square 
one. 

"We're looking over the pool of 
candidates again and soliciting rec- 
ommendations to create an even 
larger pool," Epps said. "We have a 
couple of candidates, but I can't 
give any names right now." 

Middle blocker Suzanne Hagge 
said she is worried about not having 
a coach because spring practices 
have already began. 

"I'm concerned that we don't 
have a coach yet," Hagge said. 
"We've been kept in the dark and 
not informed about anything at all. 

"Actually, now that we've been 
practicing, it's going to be a hassle 
to have to change things around to 
fit a new routine." 

The coaching position became 
available when Patti Hagemeyer 
stepped down after three seasons 
with K-State. 

CurrenUy, the Cats are under the 
direction of assistant coach Sue 
Medley. They are spending morn- 
ings practicing and working out in 
the weight room. 

K-State has also played in a tour- 
nament this spring, and Medley led 
the Cats to two victories against 
Kansas and Missouri. 

If it were regular- season play, 
the two wins would he the Cats first 
Big Eight Conference victories 



since 1992. 

"We've been working hard since 
Christmas," Hagge said. "Sue has 
been coaching us every day at prac- 
tice. I wouldn't have any qualms 
against her being the head coach." 

The athletic department has 
established a time table for the 
selection of the next candidate. 
Epps said. 

"We should be done in a couple 
of weeks," Epps said. 




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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



-Wildcat Watch- 



Wodnosday. April 13. 1994 3 




< Jon Oiseth, southpaw 
pitcher for the Wildcat., 
took* for the sign just before 
the K -State-Missouri game 
was postponed on Saturday. 
The Cats lost the game, 
which was finished Sunday, 
8-2. 

WHtTllY 

Colegien 



▼ K - State player* start to 

cover the baseball field with 
protective covers as the 
Saturday gams ts postponed 
on account ol weather. The 
game was continued the next 
day. The Cats also tost 
Sunday's second gams, 9-1. 

WMT1 

Cottgtiri 



Errors COnfoUnd Wildcats Oiseth's expectations on the ris 




"Yesterday, 
we hail a 
scrimmage. 
Then, I went 
home and 
showered, 
had a Big 
Mac and 
came up here 
for the 
baseball 
game at 3." 

Matt Miu* 

Sophomore 
designated hitter and 
football team backup 

quaterbacfc 



Oatajm 

Sloppy weather, sloppy 
playing conditions and 
sloppy play. 

Put it all together, and 
you get the K- State baseball 
team suffering a three-game 
sweep to Missouri in 
Manhattan last weekend. 

The Wildcats, now 11-24, 
dropped further in the Big 
Eight with a 2- 10 conference 
record, while the Tigers 
improved to 23-10 on the 
year and 6-5 in the league. 

Not much went right for 
the Cats throughout the 
weekend, but Coach Mike 
Clark didn't have any 
trouble finding what went 
wrong after Sunday's games. 

"Our defense was bad, 
our relief pitching was 
horrible, our starting 
pitching was off- and -on, we 
didn't execute offensively 
and we couldn't get three 
good at-bats together," Clark 
said. 

"Nine walks, six errors, 
two balks — a pretty 
average team could have 
beat us today." 

The Tigers found a way 
to beat the Cats every day, 
capitalizing on three K-State 
errors Friday, five on 
Saturday and six on Sunday. 

Friday's starter, junior 
Adam Novak, lasted 7 2/3 
innings while allowing six 
hits and five runs. The 
Tigers took full advantage of 
the three K-State errors, 
scoring three unearned runs. 

The Cats relied on a 
couple of freshmen for most 



of their offense. First 
baseman Brad Marker went 
3-for-4 with a pair of 
doubles. Third baseman 
Todd Fereday also doubled 
twice. That bumps Fereday 
up to 27 RBIs 

Playing under gray skies 
Saturday, the Tigers had 
pulled out to a 5-2 lead in 
the top of the seventh inning 
when the rain and wind hit. 
The coaches decided to 
postpone the final innings 
until Sunday. 

That didn't help the Cats, 
as Missouri earned an 8-2 
victory. 

The Cats' Jon Oiseth 
dropped to 4-5 with the loss, 
allowing six runs on six hits 
in six innings. 

It was senior catcher 
Ryan Dixon and Harker 
again leading the Cats 
offensively, boih going 2- 
for-4 on the game. 

Sunday's third and final 
game looked promising for 
the Cats, as they jumped 
ahead early in the second 
inning. 1-0, But the Tigers 
didn't stay down for long. 
Justin Towe's two-run 
homer put Missouri up, 3-1, 
in the third. 

The Cats struggled the 
rest of the game, crossing the 
plate for the last time in the 
seventh inning. Missouri 
added three insurance runs in 
the ninth inning. 

Taking the loss for K- 
Slate was Eric Yanz (0-3). 
Right fielder Dave Hendrix 
had a 3-for-4 outing, while 
Fereday chipped in a couple 
hits for the Cats. 



Coach Clark was already 
planning Monday's practice 
as the Cats take on Nebraska 
Tuesday and Wednesday in 
Manhattan, K-State then 
travels to Lincoln for a 
three-day weekend series 
against the Huskers. 
Nebraska is silting on a 2-6 
Big Eight record. 

"We'll work out Monday, 
and we've got to come out 
and team to play every day 
no matter what the situation 
is." Clark said. "Thai's 
something we didn't do this 
weekend, and from now on, 
we've got to come out and 
do it." 

Sophomore designated 
hitter Matt Miller was one 
bright spot for K-State. as he 
extended his hitting streak to 
14 games over the weekend. 

Miller, who is also filling 
the role of backup 
quarterback for the football 
team, had a big week, 
batting .409. His .412 
average in Big Eight games 
was good enough for second 
place in the conference last 
week. 

While Miller is keeping 
busy with both sports, he 
said he's handling it pretty 
well. 

"It's real time consuming, 
but I'm getting used to it." 
he said. "Yesterday, we had 
a scrimmage. Then, I went 
home and showered, had a 
Big Mac and came up here 
for the baseball game at 
three. 

"I'm taking my vitamins 
and eating my Wheaties," 
Miller said. 




Oiseth 






When he was in high school in Minnesota, 
Jon Oiseth didn't expect much as a college 
freshman. 

When he arrived at K-Stata, he didn't expect 
to wm many games. 

Now, as the Cats* 
most successful pitcher 
halfway through the 
season, he's expecting 
more. 

"It's funny, because at 
the beginning of the year, 
all 1 wanted to do was just 
play." Oiseth said "I 
would have accepted not 
doing well, just to get my 
feet wet and get in there. 
But we were called upon 
to make a transition really fast as freshmen, so 
now I expect more of myself." 

This attitude has yielded results for the 6- 
foot-3 southpaw from Bomsville. Minn., who 
has surprised the Cats by posting a 4-5 record 
on the year white tallying 27 strikeouts. He also 
has both of K-State 's Big Eight Conference 
wins, having defeated Kansas and Iowa Stale 

Oiseth appears to be taking his recent 
success in stride. 

"In high school, I was more nervous to pitch 
than 1 am now," Oiseth said. 

"But I think that has to do with just being 
more confident in myself now. I didn't really 
nave a good fall, so I don't think anyone really 
expected me to do as well as I've done. There 
wasn't a lot of outside pressure placed on me, 
so 1 was able to just go up there and do what I 
needed to do." 

Oiseth did what he needed as a high schooler 
in Minnesota, as he pitched his way to being 
named one of the top 50 players in the stale one 
year ago. In 1993, Oiseth set a Minnehaha 
Academy record with 94 strikeouts, going 6-2 
on the year with an eamed-run average of 1 .46 
in 52-2/3 innings. 

Along with fellow Wildcat Scott Poepard. 



Oiseth played in the Minnesota All-Star ga 
and was named team captain and earned inost- 
valuable-player honors. 

Even though he had a successful prep career, 
Oiseth said knowing what it's like to fail has 
been helpful. 

"Some of the pitchers I know were all 
flawless in their high-school careers, and they 
may not be able to accept a little bit of failure," 
he said. "But I did lose in high school 
occasionally, so I know I am going to fail from 
time to time. That makes me realize thai 1 
learn more and that I've learned a lot already. 1 

He gives some of that credit to K-State 
pitching coach John Baptists. 

"I've learned a lot with him already 
year." Oiseth said. "He wasn't here in the fall, 
but some of the upperclassmen say they've 
learned more in this short time with him than all 
the years they've been here. He weeks with Bt 
one-on-one. where we're not just out the 
shagging balls." 

While K -Stale has struggled lately as a I 
Oiseth said the young Cats aren't down 
themselves. 

"We've eliminated the blowouts, and 
seem to play pretty good baseball. But we ] 
aren't winning," he said. 

"We'll out-hit a team, and we'll lose 
couple nuts. But we've had a tough 
too. I just think that we're young, and you i 
look for too many answers right now 
it's a long season, and, obviously, we're going 
to lose from time to time. For the most part, 
though, we're not getting humiliated," 

As for Oiseth's strategy for the rest of i 
season, he's looking for bigger and better I 
out of his performances. 

"Right now. I'm not satisfied with 
winning," be said. "Like against Iowa State, 
sure. 1 got the win. but I still was sort of 
disappointed in my performance. I was 
happy with some of my games when I got 
loss. 

"Now, it's not just a big thing that I'i 
actually playing at (be college level — I want i 
win." 



F 




GOLF 



Cats looking to fine tune game 



estate 

The K-Stale men's and women's golf 
teams are a study in contrast. 

The women have notched two second- 
place finishes on the year and are led by a 
dominant player having a career year, Jacque 
Wright. 

The men, on the other hand, have 
struggled to regain the success they found 
last year, mustering only disappointing 
middlc-of-the-pack finishes this spring, and 
are searching for a leader, 

"We've been playing pretty good golf 
lately and are looking forward to playing well 
in the tournament in Norman," assistant 
coach Jim Brenneman said of the women's 



The women went to Norman, Okla., for 
the Susie Maxwell Berning Tournament on 
Monday and will be banking on the 
continued excellent play of Wright to help 
them to another top finish. 

Wright has led the women this year with a 
79.8 stroke average, which is on pace to 
make 'her the first K-State woman to post a 
sub- 80 average for a year. 

Meanwhile, Coach Mark Elliott took a 
senior-heavy men's team to Birmingham, 
Ala., for the Bent Brook/Blazer Invitational 
on Tuesday. 

"We ore nearly done with our season, and 
we still have a lot of questions to be 
answered throughout our lineup." Elliott said. 

Elliott will look to answer those questions 
by sending three seniors to Birmingham in 
hopes of finding a leader. Seniors Sean 
Robertson, Will Siebert and Chad Judd were 
joined by sophomores Troy Halterman and 
Jason Losch as the Wildcats took on the 14- 



team field. 

"I was very pleased with our first round of 
qualifying last Thursday," Elliott said. "We 
had several rounds in the low 70s on a windy 
day. So, we're definitely more positive going 
to Birmingham, but we still need somebody 
to really step up and play well." 




I HAC*aWCo»»vl«n 

Sean Robertson checks the lie of the 

ball on the ureen last Saturday In Wichita. 



FOOTBALL 



Former Cats look to future in NFL; 
draft scheduled for April 24 



Colkfiui 

Success on the college 
gridiron could lead to 
a successful career in 
the National Football 
League. 

The collegiate accomplishments of 
1993 K-State football players Jaime 
Mendez. Kenny McEntyre, Andre 
Coleman, Bryan Campbell, Thomas 
Randolph and Quentin Neujahr has 
them anticipating the NFL draft on 
April 24, in New York City. 

"I'm nervous," McEntyre said. "It 
doesn't do any good to be nervous. If 1 
don't get drafted, I'll have to be a free 
agent, which isn't all that bad in the 
NFL right now." 

Mendez. who is listed as a late first- 
round or early second -round pick by 
Sports Illustrated, said he has been 
working hard to gel ready for the NFL. 

"I've been doing a lot of speed 
work that my agent recommended," 
Mendez said. 

"We run drills for the scouts, run a 
40 time, and do whatever they want 
you to do." 

Randolph is also listed as a first 
rounder by Sports Illustrated, and 
since his he is expected to go sp high 
in the draft, he signed with an agent in 




early January. This was the first from 
the group of professional football 
hopefuls. 

"He's got the speed to become an 
instant impact player," Arthur 
McAfee. Randolph's agent said. 

"He can do whatever he puts his 
mind to. He is so 
talented." 

With the draft 
open to all of the 
NFL teams, a 
player could get 
drafted by a 
team that he 
doesn't like. 

However, a 
few of the 
former Wildcats 
don't care where 
they end up. 

"It doesn't matter to me," Coleman 
said. "If I get the opportunity to play 
in the NFL. I will go anywhere that 
lets me play. 

"I'll play for any team." 

Neujahr said it also doesn't matter 
to him, either. 

"I was told that I played well in the 
Shrine Bowl," Neujahr said. 

"That gave me a chance to get 
looked over again. I would go where 
ever they would give me a chance to 
play." 

Campbell said a couple of teams 
have been looking at him, 



Coleman 



"Right now, the Raiders have me 
rated the highest." Campbell said. "A 
few other teams have expressed 
interest." 

Sports Illustrated said Randolph 
will be drafted by the San Francisco 
49ers in the first round. 

"I definitely 
think that he is 
first-round 
material," 
McAfee said. 
"He didn't play 
too well in the 
post- season 
bowl, but the 
scouts don't 
look at how he 
did in the game. 

"They look at 
how he did in the practices." 

With the aspirations of being 
picked in the draft and being a 
successful player, there is a definite 
possibility that not all of the players 
will make it in the NFL. 

"If football doesn't work out for 
me, I will come back here and work on 
my master's degree," Campbell said. 

Mendez said he will finish school 
in May. 

Graduating from K-State will help 
him in case his prospects in the NFL 
do not work out. 

"If it doesn't wurk out. (hen I will 
have to get a job in the real world." 




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75 45 



WEATHER - PAGE 2 



APRIL 14. 1994 



KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66506 



VOLUME 99A, NUMBER 136 



Like 
sands 
through 
the 
hour- 
glass 

As 11 p.m. 
slowly pastes 

by, presidential 
candidate 
Michelle Smith, 
senior In political 
science and Inter- 
national studies, 
and hsr husband, 
Mike Smith, 
sank* In nuclear 
engineering, start 
dozing off whlia 
wait! ng for the 
•taction results to 
come In. 



Co41*glm 




ELECTION RESULTS? 

Results from the election will not be 
available until 12:30 p.m. today. A sign will be 
posted in the SGA office announcing all of the 

election results. The results will also be 
broadcast on DB-92 or you can call and listen 
to a recording at 532-7290. The delay was 
attributed to few computers and the use of 
student volunteers rather than professional 
pollsters. 



Election outcome unknown; 
results expected at 1 2:30 p.m. 



"I know some 
of the 
candidate* 



disappointed, 
but this Is the 

safest way to 

dolt." 

David Fuse 
Student Body 
Vice President 



Candidates 
waited for 
election 
results for 
five hours 
Wednesday night 
before learning 
the results would 
not be announced 
until noon today. 

The Election Committee 
announced at about 12:30 
p.m. Wednesday that inex- 
perienced computer opera- 
tors and a need for valida- 
tion would delay election 
announcements. . 

The results were tabu- 
lated by hand and on com- 
puter, David Frese. student 
body vice president, said. 

"We have always used 




professionals," Frese said. 
"We are using student vol- 
unteers for the first time 
this year, and they are not 
as quick." 

Frese said the people 
who were going to count 
the ballots practiced four or 
five times before the elec- 
tion. 

"They could have 
worked all night, but then 
there would have been 
more chances there would 
have been a sloppy mis- 



take," he said. 

New computers and a 
new computer program 
were used to help tabulate 
results. 

Ed Skoog, student body 
president, said a lack of 
computers was a factor in 
the delay. 

Skoog said the delay 
could have been foreseen. 

"If we would have had 
professional key punchers, 
we would have had enough 
people," he said. 

Frese said the commit- 
tee made its decision in the 
interest of fairness. 

"I know some of the 
candidates are disappoint- 
ed, but this is the safest 
way to do it," Frese said. 

Steffany Carrel, student 
body presidential candi- 
date, said the Elections 
Committee has done a 



good job so far. 

"Running the elections 
for this University is a 
large undertaking," she 
said. "The road's been 
bumpy, but it's part of the 
territory. 1 commend them 
for doing their best" 

Nabceha Kazi. Carrel's 
running mate for student 
body vice president, said 
she was not upset with the 
elections committee. 

"It's not something they 
could have prevented," 
Kazi said. "Computer fail- 
ure is no one's fault." 

Jeff Peterson, student 
body presidential candi- 
date, said the committee 
told him it had problems 
with student staff and veri- 
fication. 

"Well, 1 guess we get to 
wait about 1 3 more hours," 
Peterson said after receiv- 



ing the call. "ltd be nice to 
know tonight, but everyone 
is in the same position as 
we are. 

"It's not like it's unfair 
to us," Peterson said. "I 
really don't have a reason 
to complain." 

Stacy Dalton, presiden- 
tial candidate, said she 
wasn't very happy, but 
nothing could change what 
happened. 

Her running mate. Dale 
Silvius, said he didn't 
understand why the votes 
couldn't have been counted 
by hand in time. 

"I'm very, very frustrat- 
ed," Silvius said. 

Taylor Miller, vice pres- 
idential candidate running 
with Ben Eastep, said late 
election results are uncon- 
trollable. 

■ See DELAY Page 14 



Committee: 
mistakes 
result of 
lack of time 



QWhjka 

Members of the Senate Election Committee 
said inadequate time to plan was a primary factor 
in election mistakes. 

Shanta Bailey, chair of the Election 
Committee, said the omission of a candidate 
from the ballot and a mistake in the instructions, 
for voting for Union Governing Board were cler- 
ical errors, 

"We checked the ballots the night before, but 
we're only human, and I'm very sorry." Bailey 
said. 

She said a lot of the other problems could 
have been avoided if the Election Committee 
was a year-long standing committee. 

The Student Governing Association bylaws 
state that the chair of the Election Committee 
must be appointed 45 days before the election 
takes place, DeLoss Jahnke, Student Senate 
chair, said. 

The committee must be formed within 30 
days of the election, 

He said Bailey was appointed sometime in 
mid-February, and the committee was formed 
through an appltcation-and-interview process in 
the beginning of March. 

Jonathan Beall, member of the Election 
Committee, said the committee's first priority 
was to look over the campaign regulations and 
try to improve them so there would be no repeat 
of the election of 1993, when the presidential 
run-off had to be repeated. 

Beall said the committee only had about a 
week to a week and a half to review the regula- 
tions. 

"We didn't have as much time as we should 
have had," he said. "We spent many nights, 
sometimes sevenfhour nights, looking over regu- 
lations to make some better. We didn't have 
enough feedback from last year, so we had to fix 



I See VAGUE Page 14 



MEETING TODAY 

Student Tribunal will have an open meeting at 5 

p.m. Thursday in the Union Council Chambers Is 
hear appeals by Jared Adams, Janelle Moore and 
Tonya Foster concerning their disqualifications 

from the SGA elections. 



Junction City teen 
convicted for attack 



Other 2 suspects 

awaiting judgement 
for attack of student 



Orefcajai 

Floyd K. Grass, 17, was convict- 
ed of aggregated battery and aggre- 
gated robbery Tuesday in the attack 
against Hai Huang, graduate student 
in regional and community plan- 
ning 

Grass attended Junction City 
High School and is the first of three 
males to be tried in the attack that 
occurred Nov. 1 8 near the Nata- 
lorium. 

Grass was tried as a juvenile and 
will be sentenced May 18. 

"We're real happy with the out- 
come of this one," Richard 
Herrman, K-Statc Police officer, 
said. 

"We're waiting to see the out- 
come for the other two." 



Herrman said investigators were 
able to connect Grass and the other 
two men to the case because of a 
bag, owned by Huang, found in a 
parking lot in Ft. Riley. 

Also, a resident spotted the car 
and was able to give a description 
and tag number. 

Police then monitored the owner 
of me car and did background work 
to learn about the owner's associa- 
tions. 

This led to the arrest of three 
suspects, Herrman said. 

Grass was al|p convicted on 
another count of aggravated robbery 
related to another incident that 
occurred the same evening in 
Manhattan. 

K-State Police worked in con- 
junction with Riley County Police, 
because Riley County had had three 
similar incidences in November and 
December in which people were 
attacked, beaten and robbed, 
Herrman said. 



News Digest 



► ENDEAVOUR TESTS 
ADVANCED RADAR 

CAPE CANAVERAL, Ra. — 
The most advancad radar aver 
flown by NASA loomed In on 
flooded Amazon forests and Icy 
Siberian lakes on Wednesday as 
Endeavour's mission neared tfie 
midway point. 

Ground controllers aimed the 
radar instruments aboard 
Endeavour at the lost city of Ubar 
in Oman, discovered by radar that 
flew on previous shuttle missions, 

Endeavour's six astronauts 
have been photographing the sites 

►STUDENTS OBJECT 

TO NAZI PAINTING 

OMAHA. Neb — A small col- 
lege should either take down a 
painting ot Helnrich Hlmmler or put 
up a notice that the artist intended 
to condemn Nazism, the Student 
Senate said. 

Some students objected to the 
painting kn the library ot Midland 
Lutheran College, The school's 



with an assortment ot cameras and 
popping new tapes into the radar- 
data recorders since arriving in 
orbit Saturday. 

'It's a challenge lor us to do the 
same thing day after day and not 
make a mistake." shuttle comman- 
der Sidney Gutierrez said. 

The astronauts reported earlier 
this week that many of Canada's 
lakes appeared to be frozen. But 
on Wednesday, they said some of 
the Ice was starting to break 

"We're pretty excited about 
this." Jobea Way, a scientist at Jet 
Propulsion Laboratory, said 



president, Cart Hansen, noted the 
students that censorship was a tool 
of Adolf Hitler. 

The Senate voted Tuesday 
night to recommend that if the 
painting isn't removed . It should be 
accompanied by a disclaimer. 

The Sonata voted to urge the 
school to take down the painting 
but took the second vote after 
Hansen wrote his letter 



Elections Committee 
lambasts coverage 



JLH. PWATWW , _^ 

CWkftaa 

Senate Election Committee 
members said they thought the 
coverage of the election and their 
committee by the Collegian was 
unfair. 

Kara Rogers, sophomore in 
journalism and political science 
and a member of the Elections 
Committee, said she thought the 
editorial on the Collegian's front 
page was inappropriate, 

"I understand thai they have 
every right to scrutinize and criti- 
cixe our performance and to see 
that the student body is receiving 
the fairest election possible," 
Rogers said. "But, in my personal 
opinion, not speaking for the 
entire committee, I feel thai it 
was wrong for the Collegian to 
tnt their front page- as an editori- 
al page. 

"The opinion page Is for opin- 



ion. They already wrote one edi- 
torial representing the editorial 
board's view. Why did they need 
two? 

"1 also felt that the cartoon (on 
the editorial page) was very out 
of line," she said. 

The editorial cartoon depicted 
a blind-folded Shanta Bailey. 
chair of the Elections Committee, 
selecting candidates for the elec- 
tion ballot by throwing darts at a 
dariboard. 

"When people see that car- 
toon, they're going to believe that 
I hand-picked the candidates that 
go on the ballot, and that's not 
true," Bailey said. 

Jonathan Beall, freshman in 
electrical engineering and com- 
mittee member, said he thought 
the coverage was definitely one- 
sided and misrepresented the 
committee. 

■ SeeCOLLEQIANPagcl2 



Q Thufwtoy, April 14. 1»»4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



# National News 



by the Associated Press 



► LOVE ARRESTED DAY 

BEVERLY HILLS, Call). — Singer 
Courtney Love was arrested and 
examined for a suspected drug over- 
doaa ttia day before her hu abend, 
grunge-cock star Kurt Cobaln. was 
found dead, police said Wednesday 

Cobain, the 37-year-old singer lor 
the band Nirvana, killed himself with 
a shotgun blast to the head. His 
body was found Friday al the Seattle 
home he shared with his wife and 
their 20-month-oid daughter, 
Frances Bean. 

Love totd Seattle TV station KIRO 
on Wednesday that Cobaln was 
using heroin when he hilled himself 
She said narcotics were found next 
to his body 

Love told the TV station she has 
had her own problems with drugs, 
but she wanted to send a message 
to Nirvana tens thai drugs don't 
solve anything. 

Beverly Hills Police Sgt Robert 
Smith said Love was arrested last 
Thursday at a hotel tor drug poeeee- 
slon and taken to Century City 
Hospital because of a suspected 
heroin overdose. 

She was released Irom the hospi- 
tal the same day and booked tor 

► LAWYER: KING WAS BEATEN 

LOS ANGELES — Rodney King 
was beaten by white police officers 
because he is black, and he should 
be awarded $15 million In a lawsuit 
symbolic ol the civil-rights move- 
ment, his lawyer argued Wednesday 

"Medgar Evers, Martin Luther 
King, Malcolm X — these people 
were all In the civil-rights movement 
voluntarily. Mr. King Is a symbol 
involuntarily, but no less a symbol," 
lawyer Milton Grimes said in closing 
arguments. 

But Deputy City Attorney Don 
Vincent told Jurors that race had 
nothing to do with the case, and he 
questioned whether a racial slur was 
really uttered during I he March 3, 
1991, beating. 

He suggested a fair award Irom 
the city would be $800,000. four 
times the medical costs King has 
incurred, but also offered a range of 
$500.000 10(1 million. 

The case was to go to the Jury 



BEFORE COBAJN FOUND DEAD 



investigation of possession of a con- 
trolled substance, possession of 
drug paraphernalia and possession 
of a hypodermic needle, Smith said 

She was released after posting 
$10,000 ball later that day. he said. 
Arraignment was set lor May 5. 

Love Is a singer with the group 
Hole. Hole's new album, which 
appeared in stores this week, is titled 
"Uve Through This.' 

Love was interviewed off-camera, 
and the TV station broadcast a tran- 
script of her quotes She said Cobaln 
was not an addict, but he used hero- 
in occasionally 

"Kurt was very depressed." KIRO 
quoted her as saying. "Some people 
juat have thin skins. He tried things 
like Prozac, but opiates were whai 
made him feel best." 

The station also spoke to Nirvana 
bassist Krist Novoselic, who down- 
played the Importance of heroin to 
Cobaln. 

"It wasn't the dope — it wee 
something Internal," he was quoted 
as saying, 'it It hadn't been heroin, it 
would have been booze or cappuci- 
no. Drugs were just a small part of 
Kurt" 

BECAUSE OF H« RACE 

late Wednesday. 

After jurors reach a compensato- 
ry-damage figure, a second phase of 
the trial will address how much offi- 
cers and other defendants should 
pay In punitive damages meant to 
punish and prevent recurrence of 
such incidents 

Vincent suggested King would 
not have been beaten It he hadn't 
been driving while he was drunk and 
speeding away from officers. He said 
King wasn't stopped because he Is 
black. 

But Grimes noted that an audio 
expert had isolated what sounded 
like a racial slur on the soundtrack of 
the beating videotape 

"Close your eyes and listen lo the 
tape." he fold jurors. "You can't close 
your eyes and pretend 'nigger' 
wasn't said on March 3, 1991, 
because you don't want to hear it." 

But Vincent said he could not 
hear the word on the soundtrack. 



► VERMONT GOVERNOR 
OKS DAIRY-LABEL LAW 

MONTPELIER. Vt. — 
Gov. Howard Dean signed 
the nation's first law requiring 
labels on dairy products that 
come from cows treated with 
a synthetic hormone that 
boosts milk production 

"Vermonters have the 
right to know what Is fn the 
food they eat,* Dean said 
Wednesday. The law will 
take effect m 00 days. 

The federal government 
recently approved use Of the 
genetically engineered 
bovine growth hormone 
made by Si. Louis-based 
Monsanto Co. 

The Food and Drug 
Administration, the American 
Medical Association and the 
American Dietetic 
Association all say milk from 
BGH-treated cattle Is sate. 

But some humane organi- 
zations and consumer groups 
question whether the drug 
poses neks that have not 
been thoroughly addressed, 
and some farmers tear its 
use could drive prices down 
and force them out of busi- 
ness. 

► MERAM EC RIVER 
OVERFLOWS BANKS 

VALLEY PARK, Mo. — 

Bank customers cleared out 
safe deposit boxes, busi- 
nesses shut their doors, and 
residents fled their homes 
Wednesday as the Meramec 
River flowed into the streets 
for the third time in a year. 

All across eastern and 
central Missouri, volunteers 
piled up sandbags, and evac- 
uees camped out in churches 
and schools. 

Streams also were out ol 
their banks from Oklahoma to 
West Virginia. In Illinois. ISO 
National Guardsmen were 
activated to help flood victims 
Wednesday. 



i. POLICE REPORTS i 

K-STATE POLICE 

These reports are taken directly from the daily toga of the 
K- State and Alley County Police departments. Because of 
space constraints, not all Crimea are I 

WIDNUDAY, APRIL 13 

At 9:33 a.m., a theft was Al 10:13 a.m.. Sgt. Sutton 

reported in Juitin Hall. Taken reported finding u container of a 
was a Tire extinguither valued al controlled substance at the job 
$23. tile north of Water* Hall. 




tarn COUNTY POLICE 



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13 

At 2:24 a.m.. Bill Beier Al 2:32 a.m.. Anthony Hays, 

reported an unwanted subject at 1923 Hayes Dr.. was arretted for 

the Mini Marl. 1 102 l.ar.imie driving under the influence He 



The subject left willingly. 



waa released on $300 bond. 



■ Intradural entry deadline for track mad and free throw will 
be al 5 p.m. today at the Recreational Service* office in *ie Rec 
Complex. 

■ Am and Sciences Ambassador* will have a Graduate School 
informational seminar at 4:30 p.m. today in Union 206. 

■ Intramural entry deadline for track meet and free throw will 
be at 3 p.m. today at the Recreational Services office la Sat Rec 
Complex, 

■ Aits and Science* Ambassadors will have a Graduate School 
informational seminar at 4:30 p.m. today in Union 206. 

■ Applications for co-boats and production staff for the call-In 
talk -radio show "A Purple Affair art available in the Office of 
Student Activities and Services in the Union and at dw DB92 stu- 
dios In McCain }I7. Applications are due by 3 p.m. April 29. 

■ Ag Student Council Committee applications are available in 
Waten 120. Applications are due 10 Waters 120 by noon April IS. 



REGULATIONS HEARING 



Parking Services will answer questions and 
hear concerns from students about the changes in 
the parking and bicycle regulations at 3 p.m. today 
in the Union Big 8 Room. 



POSTMASTER'S NOTICE 

The Kansas State Cotegian (USPS 291 020), a student newspa- 
per at Kansas Slate University, is published by Student Publications 
Inc., Kedne Hall 103, Manhattan, Kan 66506 The Collegian is pufc- 
ished w oo fc rJ sy s during the school year and once a week through 
the summer Second dass postage is paid at Manhattan, Kan. 
66502 

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Kansas State 
Collegian, circulation desk, Kedzie 103. 
I, Kan. 66506-7167. 



THURSDAY, APRIL 14 

■ Icthus will meet at t p.m. la the Union Litue Theatre 

■ Rotaract wilt meet at 9 p.m. in Union 203. 

■ Al-Anon will meet at 3 p.nt in Lafene02l. 

■ Alpha Kappa Psl will meet at T p.m. in Union 209. 

■ American Society of Civil Engineers/CEOI 3 will have s picnic 
st 6 p.m. at the City Park Pavilion. There will be free pizza for 
ASCE members, and a sand volleyball game between A5CE stu- 
dents and CE faculty 

■ Blair Jones of the U.S. Geological Survey Water Resource* 
will present "Clay Minerals in Ground- Water Environment* - at 4 
p.m. in Thompson 2)3. 

■ Dr. Epfiraim Sparrow of the University of Minnesota will pre- 
sent "Coping with Incomplete Knowledge Bases in Engineering 
Practice and Education" at 4:30 p.m. in Union Forum Hall at pen of 
the American Society of Mechanical Engineers 1993-94 distin- 
guished lecturers program. Sparrow hat B.S and M.S. degree* from 
the Matiactiusett* Institute of Technology, and M.A. and Ph.D. 
degree* from Harvard. 

■ Dr. J. Michael Scon, of the Idaho Cooperative Fish and 
Wildlife Research Unit and the University of Idaho-Moscow, will 
present "GAP Analysis: Proactive Approach to Conservation 
Management" at 4 p.m. in Ackert 221 




YESTERDAY'S HIGHS AHD LOWS 




OMAi 
42/ 



ITCRRATT, 
RUSSELL 46/33 

DLAMD S V M 

m 




S&'W 



KANSAS 
CITY 
47/ a? 



RDENCTTY 

57/38 



WICHITA* COFFEYVIJLE 



TULSA 

59/39 




Late afternoon thunderstotms In 

the east. Highs from the upper 

60s to 70s. Friday, not as warm. 



A 30 percent chance 
for late afternoon 
thunderstorms. High 
75 to 80. 



TOMORROW 



Friday, not as warm, 
with highs in the 
upper 50s to 
mid-SOs. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Finney chooses state amphibian; 
salamanders get place in history 




TOPEKA — Gov. 
Joan Finney picked a 
sunny day in a stretch of 
rainy weather to invite 
tome beady-eyed bug 
eaten to hang out on her 
front lawn. 

The barred tiger sala- 
manders probably would 
have preferred the rain. 
They rested in water dish- 
es as the sun shone 
through their plastic 
cages. 

More than 900 chil- 
dren chanted and cheered 
as Finney gave the sala- 
manders a place in Kansas 
history. 

"It's the neatest 
amphibian the state could 
possibly have," Finney 
told the children. They 
crowded together in front 
of her home, Cedar Crest, 
to watch the governor 
sign a bill into law desig- 
nating the barred tiger 
salamander as the official 
state amphibian. 

Finney grasped a cage 
containing a grinning 
salamander and hoisted it 
above her head. The chil- 
dren, many wearing T- 
shirts bearing the sala- 



mander's likeness, chant- 
ed their mascot's name, 
B.T. 

As she signed the bill, 
she said, "It's a done deal. 
The barred tiger salaman- 
der bill is now law." 

The ceremony marked 
the end of a joumey that 
began last spring at 
Wichita's OK Elemen- 
tary. 

After students in Alice 
Pons' second-grade class 
met a barred tiger sala- 
mander during a field trip, 
they decided the state 
should have an amphibian 
of its own. 

A class project to get 
the Legislature to desig- 
nate the salamander, prop- 
erly known to scientists as 
ambystoma tigrinum 
mavortium, as the stale 
amphibian turned into a 
school project. Last fall, 
they began contacting leg- 
islators and other schools. 
Schools in about 80 cities 
joined their cause, and in 
March, they trooped to 
the Statehouse to plead 
their case. 

Finney praised me stu- 
dents for participating in 
the legislative process, 
seizing the opportunity to 




promote her campaign for 
public initiative that was 
blocked by the Legis- 
lature this session. 

"It-would give you, the 
children, the ability to 
introduce bills your- 
selves," she said. 

Ostriches and emus 
were featured at the fes- 
tivities, because they 



deserve credit for the sala- 
manders ' success. 

Senators amended the 
amphibian proposal into a 
bill that classifies the' 
flightless birds such as 
ostriches and emus as 
livestock, and that's how 
the salamander slithered 
its way through the 
Legislature. 



The kids got to take 
home pieces of ostrich 
eggshell, along with auto- 
graphed photos of the 
governor and salamander 
postcards. 

The elementary school 
students traveled from all 
over the state for the bill 
signing. 



Gov, Joan 
Flnmy speaks 

to about 900 chil- 
dren Wednesday 
at Cedar Croat 
before making the 
barred tiger sala- 
mander the offi- 
cial state amphib- 
ian, (top photo) 



Cotogian 



_____ Thursday, April 1 4. 1804 O 

Students, adults test 
their knowledge of 
other generations 



CotkflM 

Older adults and middle- 
school students will have the 
chance to test their knowledge 
about each other's generations 
during a quiz bowl at noon, 
April 23, in the Manhattan 
Town Center. 

The quiz bowl Is being spon- 
sored by Project Re-Generate, a 
program that matches at-risk 
middle-school students with 
adults 55 and older. 

The Division of Continuing 
Education, Retired Senior 
Volunteer Program, UFM and 
the school district support 
Project Re-Generate and are 
also contributing to the event 

"The idea behind the quiz 
bowl is to improve communica- 
tion with youth and older 
adults," Linda Teener, UFM 
director, said. "We hope to 
recruit adults for Project Re- 
Generate to help kids who need 
it." 

The quiz bowl's format was 
decided by an intergene rational 
planning committee. 

Three eight -member teams, 
each composed of four adult 
participants and four youth par- 
ticipants, will compete against 
each other. 

"What we did is have a sepa- 
rate group of senior citizens and 
middle-school students develop 
the questions," Lori Bishop, 
RSVP director, said. "It allowed 
another group of people to par- 
ticipate." 



Interested in 
participating 
In the quiz 
bowl or 
Project 



can call 
Lorl Bishop 
at 776-0693 
or Linda 
Teener at 
039-8763. 



Islamic militant 

group bombs 

Israeli bus 



HADERA, Israel — Islamic 
militants bombed a bus jammed 
with soldiers and civilians 
Wednesday, killing six people and 
wounding 28. 

It was the second such attack in 
a week and raised fears of a new 
wave of violence. 

The Palestinian militants, who 
oppose the Isracl-PLO peace talks, 
vowed they would carry out at least 



three more suicide bombings as 
revenge for the killing of 30 
Palestinians Feb. 25 in a Hebron 
mosque. 

Officials tried quickly to reas- 
sure the Israeli public, whose sup- 
port for the peace talks is largely 
based on the belief they will bring 
security inside Israel's pre- 1967 
borders. 

Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin 
sent more troops to seal off the 
occupied Gaza Strip and the West 



Bank, where authorities believe the 
bomb was constructed. 

He said he would continue with 
peace talks even in the face of 
future attacks. 

"Hamas and Islamic Jihad have 
come to the conclusion they have 
to strike," Rabin said. 

"The real answer is to show an 
agreement can be carried out and 
there will be a different reality." 

He referred to Hamas, which 
claimed responsibility for 



Wednesday's bombing in this 
coastal city and for a bombing 
April 6 in Afula that killed eight. 

The morning explosion at the 
central bus station in this coastal 
city midway between Tel Aviv and 
Haifa reverberated across the coun- 
try at the start of an extended holi- 
day weekend, when Israel first 
mourns its 17,955 war dead on 
Remembrance Day and then cele- 
brates its 1948 creation on 
Independence Day. 



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with the Collegian. 

JN ow you can pick up your 

Collegian day or night. Stop by 

Bluemont, Calvin, Durland, 

Fairchild, Justin or Seaton Halls 

before your night class for the latest 

edition of the Collegian. 




KANSAS STATE 

LEGIAN 

t all h* U n Ion I 5 ) Z-«M0 




PINION 




In Our Opinion 



By tfH Collegian Editorial Board 




[get K» act 
at 
•taollon ttma 



SGA should learn from 



The ballots are in. But the results won't be fair. 

Students cannot be fairly represented by a gov- 
erning body that was elected under such a chaotic 
election. 

The Collegian will not remain silent concerning 
the inadequacies of the Election Committee to fol- 
low guidelines that ultimately affected results of 
the races. 

The, Collegian has made its mistakes, such as 
misplacing a photo of one candidate in the voter's 
guide. 

But once the Collegian realized it had made mis- 
takes, it did everything possible to rectify the situa- 
tion. 

The Election Committee has also made mis- 
takes. But the mistakes that the Election 
Committee, has made cannot be corrected with a 
mere apology. 

The Collegian is standing up for the rights of the 
students to be fairly represented by the Student 
Governing Association. 

What we want from the Election and Grievance 
committees is admission that their errors flawed 
the election enough to warrant a new one. 

The Collegian still supports having a new elec- 
tion. 

We realize a new election may not be a reality. 
Student Senate most approve or disapprove elec- 
tions results in three weeks. Senate has the power 




to do die right thing. 

But how can a body composed of friends of can- 
didates who were victorious make an unbiased 
decision on the validity of the election? 

It it also doubtful anyone in Senate would 
impeach committee members that they themselves 
were responsible for appointing and would be 
responsible for reappointing. 

If mis Is the case, the least SGA can do is tighten 
its regulations and get its act together at election 
time next year. 

Senate has come up with the idea to appoint the 
Election Committee earlier, but it has not set it 
down in legislation. The Senate needs to set a 
precedent for better elections in the future by mak- 
ing meaningful election reform before they leave 
office this year. 

Senate needs legislation that requires a chair of 
the Election Committee to be appointed one year 
before the election, as opposed to the 45 -day 
requirement now. It was obvious the committee 
was not organized enough to run an election in the 
time it had. 

What cannot be forgotten are the election results 
that were composed by the violations of the 
Election and Grievance committees. 

It would be an injustice to future candidates if 
SGA does not take action to improve its election 
process. 




SARA 

Smith 



Readers Write 



► EDITORIAL HUMOR 



Cartoon of Shanta Bailey 
demands apology — or else 

Dear Editor, 

This letter comes in response to the tasteless 
piece of an that was allowed publication on the 
Opinion Page in the Wednesday, April 13, edi- 
tion of the Collegian. 

We, the members of Black Student Union, 
will not tolerate libel attacks at any member of 
our community on or off this campus. 

As a family, when one of our members is 
attacked, we all suffer from the humiliation. 
With this being, we demand an apology not only 
from Mike Marlctt, but from the whole 
Collegian staff, no later than Friday, April 1 5, on 
Page One. 

If you fail in meeting our specified demand, fur- 
ther action will take place by Black Student Union. 

Javrwad*A. Ahdulhaqq, president-elect 
Syvetle Davis, vice president 
Black Student Union 

► hjctioks 

New election needed; committees 
no more guilty than Collegian 

Dear Editor, 

You are right — we do need a new election. 
However, the Election and Grievance commit- 



tees are not the only organizations that are at 
fault concerning the election mess. 

The Collegian shares the blame, for publish- 
ing untruths in Tuesday's voter edition about 
which candidates were indeed running. 

Yes, your correction made it to Wednesday's 
paper, but only after votes had been cast at tables 
where your election edition was displayed to 
inform voters. 

Jared Becker also has a valid point. He was 
terribly misrepresented by the Collegian as 
someone who did not take the time to appear at 
the photo session. 

That blank frame with your note in it influ- 
enced my vote and opinion, and possibly other 
people's as well. 

Your negligence and journalistic irresponsi- 
bility are inexcusable. So, I agree that K-State 
needs a new election, but I think you should look 
close to home when distributing blame. 

Lisa Blume 
freshman/psychology 

► CAHDiPATtTS RaSPOfftl 

Disqualified candidates 
misinformed, not just slackers 

Dear Editor, 

1 would like to respond to the editorial in 
Tuesday's Collegian in regard to "slackers'* in 
the candidate pool. I was running for a position 
on the Pine Arts Council because 1 care about 
these programs and K-State. My purpose for run- 



ning was not for a "resume booster or for social 
points." I worked hard in my campaigning and 
would have worked even harder on this council. 

At 10 p.m. Monday night, t was informed that 
1 had been disqualified from the elections 
because I failed to submit an expanditum report 
for my campaign. 

However, because I had not spent any money, 
there were no expenses to report. According to 
the only regulation form I was given ("Campaign 
Regulations"), it was not necessary to hand in a 
blank expenditure report. 

My only fault was that all regulations were 
not given to me and mat I was not aware of this 
rule. How can one meet a deadline if one does 
not know there is one? 

Why wasn't I notified earlier about by dis- 
qualification? I did not have the opportunity to 
defend myself and appeal before a committee. I 
am not* a slacker and don't appreciate being 
called one by those who do not even know me 
and haven't heard my side of the story. 

1 care deeply about K-State and particularly 
the Fine Arts departments. 

Simply put, this was a communication prob- 
lem, through no fault of mine, and I feel I have 
been made a scapegoat in this situation. 

The Election Committee needs to take a "long 
look" at its operation and make certain it is to the 
benefit of all concerned. 

Good luck to those who also care but are mis- 
led and confused by future Election Committee 
procedures. 

Mo Hie Masaieon 
junior/musk education 



Celebrity death 
never poetic 
dead is dead 



"What else should I be 
All apologies 
What else should I say 
Everyone is gay 
What else could I write 
I don't have the right 
What else should I be 
All apologies ..." ' 

— Kurt Cobain of Nirvana 

Kurt Cobain is dead, as we all know. 

This is not a column about Kurt Cobain. I wouldn't have written 
a column about him when he was alive. He is not a more interesting 
person now that he has put a shotgun to his 
head and pulled the trigger. When he 
attempted suicide before and failed, MTV 
didn't have a Nirvana blitzkrieg. Just 
because he succeeded in killing himself 
doesn't mean we should fawn all over his 
memory. 

As Jeff Goldblum said at his friend's 
funeral m the Big Chill, "They throw a great 
party for you on the day they know you can't 
come." 

And where do we go from here, in the 
wasted analysis of his musical and personal 
worth, in the party conversations debating 
his greatness, in the years to come when 
Nirvana with Cobain is just a memory? 

The answer is simple, both for those who 
are disturbed about his death and for those 
who see it as one less drag on society. 

We go nowhere. 

Nirvana fans and their parents can and will go around in circles 
about whether Cobain was a genius or a fool. Whether he killed 
himself because he lived too fast or because he got his just rewards 
for living a life of decadence. 

Well, he's still dead. 

That is not to say that nothing can be learned from death, but my 
generation and the one before it cling to the deaths of famous peo- 
ple. Not to the famous people themselves, you understand. They 
cling to the facts surrounding the death itself, hanging on to that as 
though it were an indicator of the worth of that person's life. 

Although ( can think of very few similarities between Kurt 
Cobain and John F. Kennedy, there arc a few. They both died in 
their primes, when they should have been reveling in life, and their 
deaths have done more for their post-mortem public relations than 
anything they could have done while they were alive. 

Suicide or any tragic death does not affirm celebrity status. It is 
exactly what its name implies, tragic. It's not poetic. It's not fate. 
It's a shame that Kurt Cobain killed himself, just as it's a shame 
when anyone does. 

As for Cobain, any assumptions or coffee-table talks on why he 
killed himself are a joke. We don't know. We'll never know. The 
people who were close to him have the right to moum his death. 
They may have some insight into what happened. Nobody else even 
has the right to pontificate about the reasons behind what he did. 

We can dissect his song lyrics, rip apart his marriage, and docu- 
ment his overdoses. All we'll be doing is cheapening what he was 
while he was alive and mangling what he means now that be is 
dead. 

Cobain may have been a public figure, but he was a private per- 
son in life. He should be allowed to remain that way in death. 

There is a part of me, though, that can't resist one little interpre- 
tation, not about how good Kurt was or why he chose to take his 
own life. The one clear thought I have about his suicide concerns 
what it means for my generation, and for his fans. 

Kurt Cobain and his music emulated, at least for me, the pure sti- 
fled rage of Generation X. He was angst, apathy, idealism and des- 
peration all concentrated into one person. His way was the way of 
anger. 

But. Cobain didn't have it all figured out. He self-destructed, for 
whatever reason. So the youth of America should take one lesson 
from his life and his death. 

His way was not the way. 

Sara Smith la a freshman In mass communication*. 



Classic films a vital part of history,- 
education neglectful of its importance 



Most of America doesn't understand classical 
music. A lot of you haven't read a literary 
masterpiece since we were in high school 
(that is assuming you didn't read the Cliff Notes). All 
of this is a cliche, by now. 

But, how many of you have seen a film from the 
golden age of Hollywood lately ("Gone With the 
Wind," although a masterpiece, being an exception)? 
It has to be something with a little importance, not 
some "Three Stooges" marathon on TBS. 

When you ask ordinary middle-school students 
what their favorite film of all time is, they will proba- 
bly respond with anything from "Terminator 2" or 
"Star Wars" to "Pretty Woman" or "Beauty and the 
Beast" (depending on what sex they are). 

I'm sure everyone reading this is saying. "1 love 
those movies!" Well, so do I, I enjoy most every 
movie I see. I just like movies. Most people do. That 
is why something like "Jurassic Park" can gross 
almost a billion dollars worldwide. 

However, the enjoyment of modern movies is 
where the comparisons between the average movie- 
goer and t stop. You see, I also enjoy classic movies. 
Not something done in the 1980s, but a really old film 
done before, oh, 1 960, A movie with William Powell 
or Katherine Hepburn can glue my face to the set. I 
did not just pick this up — my parents have always 
enjoyed old movies, so I naturally took a liking to 
them. 

The enjoyment of classic movies is something the 
mainstream of America has not grasped. Anything in 



black and white scares most people away from the 
screen — Spielberg's daring "Sen inciter's List" being 
the exception. 

Where does our society go 
wrong? Why don't we like to 



watch Hollywood's Golden 
Age on our TV sets? Why do 
films with merit lose to such 
recent hits as "Ace Ventura, 
Pet Detective" (yes, admit it, 
you went to that movie)? 

1 place the blame on that old 
dinosaur, that ancient institu- 
tion of learning, the fabulous, 
beacon of thought, yes, kids, it 
is ... The American 
Educational System, That 
wonderful little guy, who for 
years has pushed sports above 
the arts and mainstreamed 
dumb kids with smart kids, is 
the culprit. Before you stop 
reading in disgust, let me explain why. 

In your English class, I'm sure you probably 
watched a movie of a book you read in class. 
However, did you discuss who directed the movie? 
Who the stars were? The politics behind getting the 
movie made in Hollywood? How many people can 
say they watched a movie in school simply for the 
movie's sake? I imagine few have. 

Well, it is not your fault! Your country has failed 




RUSSELL 

FORTMEYER 



you. Now, I know a lot of people out there in the arts 
community are saying things like: "Movies aren't art! 
We barely have enough funding for dance and music, 
let alone something trivial as film." 

OK. I can sympathize with some of their argu- 
ments. Our school system ignores the arts. Period. No 
discussion. But, the sometimes snobbish arts commu- 
nity tends to look down its nose to film, as if it 
encompasses no artistic merit. Come on, guys, even 
Dali recognized the benefits of film. 

Film is something we should place pride in. 
Americans have been the best filmmakers in the world 
since the craft was invented. Our movies shape inter- 
national thought and influence countless directors. 
This is something even the Japanese can't take away. 
It is hard for me to understand why students do not get 
taught how to appreciate this awesome heritage. 

Our English classes should include film as part of 
the curriculum. Educators should teach the history of 
Hollywood to their students. How is a film made? 
What kind of equipment is used? How does a script 
go from a book or idea and into a movie? These ques- 
tions could be answered very easjly, given the time. 

Orson Welles' masterpiece "Citizen Kane" should 
be taught right along with Mark Twain's "The 
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." This way, students 
could analyze the film the same way they would a 
novel. They would recognize that both the novel form 
and the movie form have their, merits. They might 
even become better movie-goers and start being a lit- 
tle pickier about what they choose to spend $6 to see. 

Some educators could pull a sly one and make 
their students watch a musical like "West Side Story," 
in which they would get a healthy dose of dance, liter- 
ature, music and superior filmmaking. 

What about comedy, you say? Well, the *30s 
arguably produced the best comedies ever on film. 
Take the "Thin Man" series of films. William Powell 



NOTEWORTHY FILMS 


The Birth of a Nation" (1915) 




The Tot Commandments" (1923, 1956) 




"Greed" (1924) 




The Jazz Singer" (1927) 




"tt Happened One Night" (1934) 




"Modem Times" (1936) 




'Snow White and me Seven Dwarfs* (1 937) 




The Wizard of Oz (1939) 




"Gone With the Wind" (1939) 




•Citizen Kane" (1941) 




•Casablanca* (1942) 




"Sunset Boulevard" (1950) 


i 


#AiM 


fif 



KATIE WAUCER/Cotegto 

and Myrna Loy (who just passed away this year) 
romp through these murder-mystery films, based on 
books by Dashiell Hammett, dropping one-liners and 
enough hilarity to last the year. These are but a few of 
the films awaiting you. 

By instigating film education, our schools would 
finally be taking note of something that has been 
overlooked far too long. They Would also be creating 
a new generation of film-lovers that would preserve 
our extraordinary heritage for future Americans. 



BuMtll Foftnwyw la ■ 



In architectural 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, April 1 4, 1 994 K 



Regents answer student questions, 
advocate qualified admission policy 



Collegian 

Qualified admission would 
reduce closed classes and the num- 
ber of dropouts, members of the 
Kansas Board of Regents and K- 
Stale student leaders said. 



An informal question-and- 
answer session was conducted in 
the K-State Union as students 
voiced their concerns and opinions 
regarding such topics as qualified 
admissions and faculty tenure. 

"Qualified admission to a 
regent school is gaining popularity 



in the state," Ed Skoog, student 
body president, said. 

"It has been a topic on the state 
level for several years." 

Do to the rise in high school 
graduation, K-State and other area 
universities are experiencing 
greater enrollments. As a result. 



there has been a greater number of 
closed classes and students who 
can't enter their major. 

"The high school graduation 
rate in Kansas is increasing, and 
more and more students are going 
to college," Dale Silvius, senior in 
management, said. 

"The way things are going, you 
have an increase in students and an 
increase in closed classes." 

Many members of the board 
said they felt that qualified admis- 
sions is not only needed for the 
universities, but also a way for 
high school students to look more 



at the future and what it will take 
for them to get into college. 

Once students enter a state uni- 
versity, one-fourth of them will 
leave within the first year. 

"Even though enrollment is 
going up, students still leave the 
stale universities at a rate of 26 
percent after their first year and 56 
percent after their second year," 
Steve Jordan, executive director of 
the board, said. 

"Not all students are leaving 
college. They are just transferring 
to another university." 

Currently, federal law prohibits 



the tracking of a student on a 
national level, but tracking within 
the state is a possibility as long as 
all the schools agree to it. 

David Frese, student body vice 
president, said the issue of closed 
classes is not so much a serious 
problem as it is an inconvenience. 

"I've never had a problem get- 
ting into a class that I really want- 
ed," Frese said. 

"If a class k closed, you must 
learn how to work around the sys- 
tem. Talking to the teacher is the 
first thing a student should do to 
try and get into the class." 



Officer 

values 

ethnicity 

MM —mpoiA 

CoJtefiaA 

Fort Riley's commanding officer 
said he thinks the international rep- 
resentation of students at K-State is 
impressive. 

"I'm impressed with the interna- 
tional representation here," Major 
General Josue Robles said. 

Robles gave a speech about mul- 
ticultural sm as part of international 
week on Wednesday in Forum Hall. 

Multicultural ism is an important 
aspect in our society, he said. 

He has served for 28 years in the 
U.S. Army and has seen many 
countries, including Cambodia, Iraq 
and Spain. 

"I've really had the chance to 
observe up close and personal many 
cultures," he said. 

He also said he's had great 
opportunities to look at multicultur- 
alism and attributes that to being in 
the army. 

"The army is a microcosm of the 
world — there are many cultures in 
the army," he said. 

One of the points he made was 
the importance of education, espe- 
cially in another's culture. 

"We in the United States Army 
are a culture, and we try to bridge 
the cultures day to day." he said. 

The army has its own version of 
international week. Rather than 
having one week to try to represent 
everyone, it has one month devoted 
to one culture, he said. 

People need to learn more about 
other cultures' customs, traditions, 
foods, dance and dress, he said. 

He also said everyone needs to 
understand the people, their dialects 
and the dos and don'ts of a culture 
— especially when in that culture. 

Understanding each other is 
what will bridge the gap between 
cultures, he said. The common 




denominator in cultures, he said, is 
education. 

The more people learn about 
themselves and in general, the bet- 
ter they will be able to handle their 
responsibilities, he said. 

"Education is important — it's 
truly a way to bridge culture," 
Robles said. 

Throughout his speech, he spoke 
about minorities, which upset one 



audience member who said she had 
recently become a U.S. citizen and 
resented the word "minority." 

But Robles said he doesn't think 
the term minority is degrading — it 
simply means it's not the majority, 
he said. 

"I'm a minority, and I'm proud 
of it," Robles. who is Hispanic, 
said. 



»' * 

i t 
■ 



! '- 
t S 




the* 




» VVUttrft CWI.war/Ln Anicville 4j!) 



The Loft 

Is Closing with 

Style & Spirit 

Spring Collection 

30%- 50% off 



Fall Collection 

"0% off 



All Accessories 

50% off 



All Swimsuits 

75"" 



I// Uniques A Display Items In 
Priced To Sett. 

Ml Saiis I in.il 



tauicvilk' 



5.VJ- 1 .11 «) 



Council cm Tteffic, 




win 




Operations 



annual hearing on Thursday 

Lpril 14,1994 at 3 p.m. 
tig 8 Room, K-State Union. 
The public hearing is being 
conducted to receive comments 

on the proposed changes to 

the KSXJ Parking Regulations 

and to the proposed Bicycle Regulations, k 

The proposed changes were published 

in the March issue of the Kansas Register and 

are on UNICORN. I 




K-State President Jon Wefald 
and Major General Josue Robles 
speak with one another after 
Robles' speech on cultural diver- 
sity In the military. 

WtMTLaY 
CoSegtan 





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astf* 



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PORTS 



® 



ROYALS FINALLY WIN, 2-1 

KANSAS CITY, Mo (AP)- Rookie Bob Hun*, who has replaced George 
"Brett as Kansas City's designated hitter, hit a two-run home run with one out in me 
ninth inning Wednesday night, raHying the Royals to a 2-1 victory wer the Boston 
Red Sox. 

The Royals were routed 22-11 by the Red Sox on Tuesday night. 



APRIL I 




Players may walk 



9mm 

,\: least DM K-Siaea WiUku' •! 

pta*?*** Foes ■■■■ five othm 
iIm be mJdcrirtj -•• fern .... 
HoUtog •> offl :isJ yet, io :< 
Ih ..'-'fti' fur rs* u .-.1.1,-vo' 
in il*em, ' cosch Brim ^gltet Mid 
wbea reacted Wednesday *gta 

;rc til COB* IOl rrimiUllCJ'. ' ilk 

Mi i aver* (hnwgKiui tn* »|v. 

The prt* m var* mm fe [u-ri "4J 
Oi ■ -jdemicAfly related. PVt)rirtjj u>* 

i be Das ley to dar tunc 

"We ife tryrasj to keep 




foppy wiih *hat Ihcy are doing right 
no*: Agler said. "This is ecfwetalry 
true fa ut ciitlcf pUyerv " 

Mylar's anast ended the seeao* 1 • 
[4 C*«r*0 and 5-10 ta rht '.> if Ei(rbJ 
is,<- Ca" suffered « flm ru md lust 
t«e Big FJghi Tournament 
OUMtoHM Sbwt 

Tljht season wu Agler' s fttt w 
the Cats. He pnoved to State from 
«J»ckto| po*itioo with MUeonri 

KMHSCI'.v 

-Wl t)SVC JOOd :.i:.,u,^hh'..!, •., 

bctweea ua sod oor player* A }k 
said. "We j\»* need to keep everyone 



Netters drop match to Jayhawks, 9-0 



CRAJO PHHURTOM 



When -playing short-handed and 
against the No. 5 team in the nation, it's 
bound to gel ugly. 

K-State's women's tennis team fell to 
the fifth-rated Kansas Jayhawks, 9-0, on 
Wednesday in Lawrence. The loss drops 
the Wildcats* record to 4-15 on the sea- 
son, I -4 in conference action. 

The netters didn't roll over and play 



dead, though. Both of the Cats' doubles 
teams put up a fight but were no match 
for the highly rated Hawks. 

Marline Shrubsole and Nikki 
Lagerstrom fell to KU's Abby Woods 
and Kim Rogers, 6-4, 6-2 in No. I dou- 
bles. 

Summer Ruckman and Brooke 
Brundige also lost, by the same score, to 
Amy Trytek and Bianca Kirchhof in No. 
2 doubles. 



Knee sidelines May during spring 



Colkgiw 

First team all-Big Eight quar- 
terback Chad May has reportedly 
undergone arthroscopic knee 
surgery, sources inside the K- 
State football program said. 

May's knee was injured in a 
football -related activity, and he 
has not practiced this week. 

Wednesday, K- Slate football 
coach Bill Snyder issued a press 
release stating that May will miss 
the rest of spring drills. 

"Chad injured his knee in a 
football- related drill," Snyder 
said, "and in all likelihood will 



be out for the remainder of the 
spring." 

Because K-Slate's athletic 
trainer's would not comment on 
who the football team doctor is. 
Brad Begnoch, a physical thera- 
pist at the Physical Therapy 
Center in Manhattan, was con- 
sulted to find out more about this 
type of surgery. 

Begnoch said the surgery is 
used for any type of knee injury 
other than a fracture, and it is a 
common procedure in today's 
athletics. 

'The actual process involves 
inserting visual devices into the 



knee joint," Begnoch said. 
"Then, a doctor can probe the 
knee and see if cartilage is intact 
or if there is any loose debris. 

"With the scope, they can also 
stick instruments into the joint to 
fix the problem.*' 

Begnoch said the recovery 
time from arthroscopic knee 
surgery can vary from person to 
person. 

"If it is only a small tear in the 
ligament, then the normal recov- 
ery time is three to six weeks," 
Begnoch said. "It all depends. 
though. 

"Then, some people never 



fully recover. It depends on what 
they find in the knee." 

Snyder said May will not be 
back in top shape for several 
weeks. 

"He should be back to full 
strength by mid-to-late May," 
Snyder said. 

That would give May four to 
six weeks to heal his knee, which 
woutd be considered normal 
healing time, Begnoch said. 

May was unavailable to com- 
ment on his injury Wednesday, 
and K -State's head athletic train- 
er, John Thomas, refused to com- 
ment on May's condition. 



MEN'S BASKETBALL 



Blue-chip recruit may go elsewhere 



CoHefian 

The signing of Tom Asbury from 
Pepperdine may not be all good news for 
the Wildcats. The team may lose its top 
prospect in the form of 6-foot-6 Mark 
Young from Baton Rouge, La. 

Young said Tuesday, as reported in the 
Kansas City Star, that he may forego his 



signing with K-State. 

"Most likely, I will not be headed up 
there." Young told the Star. "It's almost 
definite that I won't be there." 

Young was the top signec brought in by 
former coach Dana Altman and his staff. 

Young turned down a scholarship from 
Arkansas. 

K -Stati- assistant coach Ken Turner, who 



himself is unsure of his future with the 
Wildcats, said he hoped Young would stick 
by his decision to come to Manhattan. 

"I just hope that we don't lose Mark 
Young," Turner said. "1 would hate to see 
him lost. He is a great player, the level we 
haven't seen here in a while." 

As a senior. Young averaged six steals, 
eight rebounds and 17.9 points per game. 
While he has not yet passed the entrance 
exam for K-State. he did re-take the test 
Saturday. 




M*HK LamNQWILL/Cotegisn 

Kirk Fraw attempt! the bunt during K-State'a game against Nebraska on Wednesday at Frank Myers Field. The Cats loet the first gam* ot 
the doubleheader, 14-4. In the second game, the Cat* loet 15-1. K-State will now travel to Nebraska lor two games In Lincoln, Neb. 



MEN'S BASKETBALL 



Cats' woes continue 



casta** 

His hands were grasping his hair as he 
watched the Wildcats lose by 10, and then 14, 
in a doubleheader against the Comhuskers. 

This wasn't the ordinary K-State baseball 
fan — it was K-State coach Mike Clark, whose 
team lost both games to Nebraska. 

The Huskers won the first game 14-4 and 
the second 1 5- 1 . 

Clark has watched his team lose 19 of its 
last 2 1 games. 

K Sunt, 11-26 overall and 2-12 in the Big 
Eight, has lost its last six contests, while 
Nebraska moved to 21-16, 5-7 in the confer- 
ence, and has won nine of its 10 games. 

The Wildcats did have a chance to win the 
first game. K-State was down 6-1 going into 
the bottom of the seventh inning. 

Matt Miller extended his hitting streak to IS 
games with a single, and Brad Harker followed 
with a double. 

Nebraska starter Troy Brohawn (2- 1 ) was 
relieved by Mike Bellows. Chris Hess hit a sac- 
rifice fly to Darin Erstad that scored Miller. 
Then. Todd Fercday came up and hit a two-run 
home run to pull the Cats within two runs, 6-4. 

Cat pitcher Sean Pedersen shut out the 
Comhuskers in the eighth, but K-State could 
not tie the game. 

Miller had a two-out single to right field. 
Harker was at the plate for the tying run, but 
Bellows struck him out to end the inning. 

Clark said his team felt it could come back 
in its next at bat. 

"I thought we had the momentum going into 



the ninth inning," Clark said. "If we turned the 
double-play ball going into the bottom of the 
ninth, everything looks great." 

After an error by shortstop Scott Poepard, 
Pedersen gave up a 400-foot homerun to Erstad 
to cushion an 8-4 lead. 

After a Matt McKay fly-ball out. Pedersen 
gave up a single and a hit a batter. 

Then, Poepard committed two more errors. 
David Johnson was sent to the mound to 
replace Pedersen. 

Johnson walked two batters and was 
relieved by Jake Voos. 

Voos walked a batter, then Comhusker Jed 
Dalton got a single before Erstad' s sacrifice fly 
to center field for the second out of the inning. 
Voos was able to get the last out, but K-State 
wasn't able to get any runs in the ninth and lost 
the game. 

Kevin Wicker (0-4) went 5-2/3 innings for 
the loss, and Bellows collected his seventh save 
of the season for Nebraska. 

Fercday said he couldn't believe the 
Comhuskers scored eight runs in the inning. 

"I said to myself, 'Wow, we're down 6-4.' I 
thought we had a shot to win one," Fercday 
said. "I definitely would like to see us get 
things together and start winning. 

"It just isn't happening right now." 

Nebraska used the momentum of the first 
game to get three runs in the first and four runs 
in the third inning of the second to help them- 
selves to a 15-1 win. 

While Nebraska's offense was hitting the 
ball. K -Siate got just two hits off of Tom 
Bergen (3-1) — singles from Dave Hendrix in 



CATS DIAMOND DATA 


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the fourth and Jay Kopriva in the sixth. By the 
time Kopriva finally got his hit, Nebraska led 
12-0. 

K-State only got three more hits in the game 
— a double by Chris Hess in the seventh, a sin- 
gle by Kopriva in the eighth and a solo home- 
run by Fereday in the ninth. 

The home run by Fereday was his third of 
the day and fifth of the season. 

Adam Novak (0-3) gave up six runs in two 
innings with the loss. 

The two teams will play again at 7 p.m. 
Friday at the Buck Beltzer Stadium in Lincoln, 
Neb. Clark said his team has to keep fighting if 
it wants to start winning games. 

"We talked and told them we've got to keep 
going," he said. "If anybody wants to quit or 
anybody starts doubting things, please, turn in 
your uniform, and we'll keep after it. 

"1 believe in the kids. I believe we can start 
turning things around and start winning some 
ballgames," 



New coach brings 
new questions 




Catsjhe 

Tom Asbury is the new coach of 
the K-State Wildcats. He is 48 years 
old. That much is for certain. 

Beyond that, however, some of 
the details and effects- of Asbury *s 
move to Manhattan may not 
become clear for several days. 

K-State Athletic Director Max 
Urick said 
some of the 
precise con- 
tract points 
have not yet 
been final- 
ized. 

"Weil, a 
1 lot of the 
specifics 
haven't 

been A,buf Y 

worked out yet," Urick said. 
"Basically, it is a five-year contract 
with a base salary of SI 1 5.000. 

"The rest will depend on the 
radio, television and shoe contracts, 
which still need to be worked out. I 
think it will work out to $250,000 a 
year." 

Former coach Dana Altman 
earned about $200,000 a year with 
base salary and incentives. 

Asbury seems to be well worth 
the money. In the six seasons he 
coached at Pepperdine. he led the 
Wave to two National Invitation 
Tournaments and three NCAA 
Tournaments. 

The Wave also had four 20-win 
seasons during Asbury' s tenure. 

This season, the Wave took 
Michigan into overtime during the 
first round of the NCAA tourney 
before losing to the Wolverines. 

"He will definitely earn every 
penny of that money," Urick said. 

The money K-State is spending 
on its new coach so far is buying it 
a positive reaction from the alumni. 

"The reaction has been excel- 
lent," Urick said. "I was on the 
phone last night until quarter after 
1 1 with congratulatory calls." 

The positive response from 
alumni bodes well for the new 
coach. Altman was not well 
received by some soon after his 
arrival. 

Asbury coaches a fast game of 
offense, emphasizing the run and 
shoot. This style of offense differs 
from the defensive strengths which 
Altman relied upon. While coached 
by Altman, the Cats were solid 
defensively, but many fans com- 
plained that the offense lacked flair. 

The change in offense should 
help the Wildcats' recruiting. 

"I mink it is good thing." K-State 
assistant coach Ken Turner said, 
'That is what the players want, and 
that is whal the fans want. He runs 
an up-tempo game, and I think thai 
is what helped him get 'he job. 

"It is fun and exciting to watch, 
and that is what the fans like." 

Assistant coach Pete Herrmann 



agreed with Turner's assessment 

"Asbury has been in a good 
coaches league." Turner said. "He's 
done a lot of coaching against older 
coaches and is a very good winner. 
A lot of coaches think they have all 
the answers, but Asbury is a very 
good winner. I think he will adapt 
to the Big Eight and to Kansas State 
very well." 

Reaction from the coaching staff 
members who have remained since 
Al (man's resignation and move to 
freight on has been positive overall. 

"His background and everything 
is good," Turner said. "He has been 
a winner with Pepperdine. He is 
hungry, and I don't think the stan- 
dards are going to drop here at all." 

Turner himself was interested in 
the position, and after Altman's res- 
ignation, many of the current K- 
State players pitched hard for him. 

Nothing came of the overture 
Turner made to Urick, however. 

"I was never interviewed for the 
position," Turner said. "I had talked 
to him about being interested in the 
job. My association with Altman's 
staff may have been the reason. 

"I was trying to get the job. 1 
think they will still fulfill the com- 
mitment that they have made with 
me, but it is up to the head coach." 

Urick said that K-State would 
abide by the current contracts the 
coaching staff had, but it would be 
by Asbury's discretion as to any 
changes on (he bench. 

"Dana has offered his staff posi- 
tions at Creighton, but I am not sure 
what their reaction to that has 
been," Urick said. 'Their contracts 
will definitely be honored by K- 
Siate It is up to the head coach to 
set his staff, hut K-State will honor 
the contracts." 

Turner did not say what his plans 
were for the immediate future other 
than keeping his options open. 

"You are always working with 
new people, and that is part of the 
job." Turner said. 

Herrmann also said that he 
would talk to Asbury. 

"I'll talk to Coach Asbury as 
soon as he gets in." Herrmann said. 
"We are going to talk. I am pursu- 
ing a few head coaching positions at 
Division-I schools. My feelings, 
though, are to stay at K-State.'* 

Reaction on the Pepperdine cam- 
pus has been mixed between sad- 
ness for his departure and happiness 
for his future success. 

Damin Lopez, senior basketball 
player with the Wave, said 
Asbury's departure was double- 
edged. While Lopes will not feel 
the effects of Asbury leaving, he 
said many of (he players were sur- 
prised by their coach's decision. 

"A lot of them at first were upset 
that he was leaving," Lopez said. 
"But then they realized that it was a 
good move for him. They realized 
that if they all stuck together, they'll 
be ok." 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



ThuwdwK April 14. 1—4 y 



Final say on academics 
rests with Faculty Senate 



AMY 

Collefian 

Papers are shuffled, eyebrows 
arc wrinkled and a range of voices 
breaks the silence of the Big 8 
Room. 

A day in the life of Faculty 
Senate is filled with decisions, 
debates and policies. 

The 81 members of the Senate 
are the driving force behind acade- 
mic proposals and curricular 
changes. 

"The Faculty Senate shares in 
the governance of the University 
and sets policies for both academics 
and outside of academics," Aruna 
Michie, president of Faculty Senate, 
said. 

Senators are elected from each 
college within the University, the 
administration, extension services 
and Farrell Library. 

The number of senators repre- 
sented depends on the number of 
eligible voters in each unit. 

Mary Rakowsky, secretary for, 
Faculty Senate, said the senators are 
elected every year and serve a 
three- year term. 

A faculty member must work at 
least half jime and must be sta- 
tioned on campus to meet the 
demands of a position in Faculty 
Senate, Rakowsky said. 

Michie said the Senate has 
evolved into a more active role for 
faculty through the years, 

"If the administration does 
something we disagree with, we 
don't have to take things lying 
down. We have channels to dis- 
agree," Michie said. 

Michie said the Senate and 



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administration work side by side on 
policies and rulings. 

"We try to work with the admin- 
istration as cooperatively as possi- 
ble, but the other side of the coin is 
that we also represent faculty's con- 
cerns and interests,*' Michie said. 

Michie said the Senate and the 
administration try to have a partner- 
ship without having a hierarchy. 

"The administration will almost 
never make an administrative move 
without running it through us," 
Michic/aid. 

"We don't see each other in a 
hierarchy, but rather work as equals 
recognizing that the University 
legally has the power." 

The Senate has the final say on 
academic matters and handbook 
changes, but it must consult the 
Kansas Board of Regents on mat- 
ters concerning new programs or 
degrees. • 



A proposal must go through an 
extensive review before it hits the 
floor of the Senate and is included 
in the agenda. 

The course and curriculum com- 
mittee collects research on a pro- 



posal and covers the packet with a 
green sheet of paper which includes 
the time, date and place where the 
college will consider the document. 

A proposal is said to be in the 
green-sheet stage when the prelimi- 
nary document has not yet been 
approved by the college. At that 
time, the proposal : s open for 
changes and modifications. 

[f the proposal concerns the wel- 
fare of the entire University, such as 
the general education or diversity- 
overlay proposal, a series of hear- 
ings would be arranged to get feed- 
back from the students, faculty and 
administration. 

The green- sheet proposals are 
reviewed in hearings, but they can 
also be considered privately by 
individual deans, department heads 
and faculty senators. 

"During the green -sheet stage, 
the proposal circulates for com- 
ments and shows whether or not 
there is duplication or if we are 
stepping on someone's toes." 
Michie said. 

After the green-sheet proposal 
has been accepted by the college, it 
is sent to a committee for review in 
the white-sheet stage. 

"At this time, we're still in the 
input stage," Bill Schapaugh, chair 




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of the academic affairs committee, 
said. 

"We encourage input and reac- 
tion and try to respond to them 
before we pass it on to Senate." 

Schapaugh said by the time the 
proposal gets to Senate, most of the 
problems have been resolved. 

Schapaugh said if a group of fac- 
ulty wants to have an item dis- 
cussed by the entire body of Faculty 
Senate, that group can gel five sig- 
natures and bypass the committees. 

"When a proposal goes through 
a committee, we can modify and 
improve it so we can bring the best 
possible ideas to Senate," 
Schapaugh said. 



Faculty and staff of the 
University comprise the majority of 
the Senate, but three students also 
have an active voice in the develop- 
ment of policies and procedures. 

The student body president, 
chair of Student Senate and the 
Faculty Senate representatives are 
allowed to vote on the floor of the 
Faculty Senate during main meet- 
ings, but they can't vote in commit- 
tee. 



Steffany Carrel, who was nomi- 
nated and elected by the Student 
Senate as a Faculty Senate repre- 
sentative, will introduce a proposal 
in May to permit the students to 
vote in the three standing Senate 
committees. 

"If we can vote on the floor of 
the Senate, it's only fair thai we 
should be able to vote in commit- 
tee," she said. 

Carrel, who had a crucial role in 
overturning the plus/minus grading 
system proposal, said the Faculty 
Senate wants to hear from students. 

"The whole goal of having a 
Faculty Senate representative is to 
execute communication and power 
of students within Faculty Senate," 
Carrel said. 

"We are the sole voices of stu- 
dents in that body." 

■ Student representatives active 



tors are and what the issues are. I've 
seen it vary." 

Carrel said she feels she has 
redefined the importance of the role 
of Faculty Senate representative. 

"I've enjoyed it and am making 
it • position that people respect, 
she said. 

"I would like someone to contin- 
ue the tradition and be equally 
involved next year." 



Michie said the involvement of 
the Senate representative varies 
from year to year, 

"Some are more active than oth- 
ers, but clearly this year, with the 
plus/minus proposal, they have 
been more active," Michie said. 

"It all depends on who the sena- 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Residence halls to try 24-hour validine 



The 

Department 
of Housing 
and Dining 
Services 
looks Into 
Installation 
of validine 
system. 



Colfcfiin 

The Housing 
department 
at K-State 
maintains a. 
pro-active stance in 
combating prob- 
lems that may occur 
in residence halls. 

For this reason, the 
Strong Complex is experi- 
menting with a 24-hour 
validine system. Alex 
Delgadillo, residence life 
program coordinator, said. 
To enter a side door, or 
main door unattended by a 
receptionist, students must 
use their ID card for admit- 
tance this semester. 

At the end of the semes- 
ter, students and staff will 
evaluate the success of the 
program, and in the future, 
all residence halls may 



change to a 24-hour vali- 
dine system. 

This year, there have 
been three fires in the resi- 
dence halls. Two of the 
fires occurred on the ninth 
floor of Haymaker Hall, 
and the third occurred in a 
trash chute in Ford Hall. 

■ Haymaker Hall flrai 



The first fire in 
Haymaker was probably 
started by a cigarette 
smothering in the couch, 
Delgadillo said, but there 
are still questions about 
how the other two fires 
were started. 

Delgadillo said housing 
took full responsibility after 
the second fire in 
Haymaker and offered to 
wash smoke-filled sheets 
and clothes. If students 
requested it, housekeepers 
also cleaned students' 
rooms contaminated by the 
smoke and students were 



relocated to another room 
on a different floor. 

In both instances at 
Haymaker, Delgadillo said 
the staff responded quickly, 
preventing more problems 
from occurring. 

Late last semester, the 
main stairwell and eighth 
floor of Moore Hall were 
covered with graffiti from 
permanent markers. 

"At first, we thought it 
was gang-related," said Joe 
Weisenberger, Moore Hall 
president at the time of the 
incident "But then we fig- 
ured out it was basically 
high school gang wanna- 
bes that had friends living 
in the hall." 

Three weeks after the 
graffiti appeared, an invol- 
untary seminar concerning 
gangs and graffiti was held 
in the dorms. 

Side doors in Moore 
Hall were then locked 24 
hours a day and the front 
and back doors were locked 



from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m., 
instead of 12 to 8 am. 

Other colleges have sim- 
ilar policies. 



■ KUlMi 

I Hi 

At the University of 
Kansas, all residence hall 
guests must sign in at the 
front desk and leave a stu- 
dent ID or driver's license. 
From 1 1 p.m. to 7 a.m., 
guests are required to use a 
student ID in the validine 
system for admittance. 

Fred McElhenie, associ- 
ate director of housing at 
KU, said the university's 
Crimestoppers program has 
been the most useful tool in 
preventing problems such 
as false fire alarms in the 
residence halls. 

"It*s very effective," he 
said. "We remind students 
about the program when 
problems occur." 

In terms of crime. 



McElhenie said they have 
not seen an increase in the 
past few years in the resi- 
dence halls, but they have 
seen an increase in the 
number of people fighting 
and insulting each other, 

"We feel we're doing a 
fairly good job now in the 
way we do things, but 
there's always room for 
improvement," McElhenie 
said. "The installation of 
the validine system is one 
of the best things we've 
done." 

At KU, staff members 
roam the halls with walkie- 
talkies directly connected to 
the police. If an accident or 
emergency takes place, 
police arc notified faster 
then if 911 was called. 

This year, McElhenie 
said there have been a few 
incidences of harassment in 
the parking lot, but they are 
very rare. McElhenie said 
there is not a forma) escort 
program at KU. 



Woman killed 
by outlawed 
Protestants 



BELFAST, Northern Ireland — Three men 
were charged Wednesday with murdering a 
Protestant woman who may have been mistaken 
for a Roman Catholic at a rowdy drinking club. 

Two other men and a woman were charged 
with aiding and abetting the murder of 31 -year- 
old Margaret Wright on April 6. 

The charges came a day after an outlawed 
Protestant paramilitary group said it killed one of 
its own members who admitted shooting Wright. 

Charged with murder were Christopher 
Sheals, 27, David Jess, 20. and Stephen Rules, 
28. Rules also was charged with possession of a 
s a wed-off shotgun, and Jess was charged with 
belonging to the outlawed Red Hand 
Commandos, a Protestant group. 

Rules told Belfast Crown Court, "1 didn't kill 
that poor girl. I only guarded the door because I 
was told to. I am sorry for the family and every- 
thing that has happened." 

Charged with abetting the killing were 
Stephen Sailers, 21, Warren Neil Gibson, 21, and 
Allison Elliott, 24, all from Belfast. 



$9 biUion 
crime bill 

I 

endorsed by 
House, Reno 



WASHINGTON — The Clinton 
administration endorsed a $9 billion 
fund for crime prevention and reha- 
bilitation as the House began wad- 
ing through dozens of amendments 
on an election-year crime bill 
Wednesday. 

"If the administration had not 
endorsed the prevention package, 
they could well have lost the entire 
Congressional Black Caucus," Rep. 
John Corners, D- Mich, said. 

He released a letter from 
Attorney General Janet Reno 
spelling out the administration's 
support of the programs. 

They range from midnight sports 
to boot camps to drug treatment for 
prison inmates. 

The overall S 1 5-billion bill con- 
tains new death penalties for almost 
70 crimes and a three-strikes provi- 
sion that would send three-time 
felons to prison for life without 
parole. 

It envisions spending $3 billion 
for state prison grants and $3.45 
billion for 50,000 more police on 
the streets. I 

House leaders have indicated 
they will accept the higher figures 
included in the Senate-passed crime 
bill — $8.9 billion for 100,000 
police — when a compromise is 
worked out. 

Rep. Bill McCollum of Florida, 
a senior Republican on the House 
Judiciary Committee, criticized the 
bill's priorities as illustrated by the 
crime prevention efforts. 

"Our first job here is to take the 
criminals off the streets," McCol- 
lum said. 

He said the government should 
address the root causes of crime, 
"but when you only put $3 billion 
towards prisons, and you put $8 bil- 
lion towards root causes, you've got 
the cart before the horse, and it's 
very wrong." 

The endorsement from Reno 
came despite barbs from numerous 
Republicans about spending bil- 
lions for midnight sports — which 
would get $50 million — and other 
programs to keep at-risk young 
people busy and safe. 

"There are, for the first time in a 
crime bill, significant resources 
devoted to crime prevention 
through giving youth employment, 
education and recreation alterna- 
tives to crime and violence as well 
as assisting state and local govern- 
ments in their vital efforts to do the 
same," Reno said in a letter to 
Conyers. 

"The administration strongly 
believes that an effective crime bill 
must include these prevention pro- 
grams, and thus, we support the full 
authorization level, in the aggre- 
gate, for the crime prevention pro- 
grams," she wrote. 

Conyers brought the letter to the 
attention of fellow members of the 
Congressional Black Caucus, who 
had been on the fence about the bill 
because of its death penalties and 
other punitive aspects. 

Under a rule approved 
Wednesday for considering the 
crime bill, 68 amendments will be 
allowed: 43 Democratic, 21 
Republican and four bipartisan. 

Many of those amendments arc 
expected to be voted on as one 
package. Debate on the death penal- 
ty provisions is scheduled today. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thur«^y, April 14, 1994 Q 



Cultural 
clothes 

A student walks 

down the runway 

during a fashion 

• how Wednesday 

morning In the K- 

State Union 

Courtyard. Students 



Elementary School 

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Cotagtan 




Baha'i group i 
returns tp K-State 




Cotkfiwi 

Although many peo- 
ple yearn for world 
peace, one religion con- 
centrates on the mes- 
sage that it is possible 
and that it will come. It 
is me Band') faith. 

Shane Etzenhouser. 
sophomore in computer 
engineering, is trying to get the Baha'f College 
Club on campus revived. 

The club has been around since the late 
1970s, although there had been a decline in 
Baha'f followers on campus,. 

The numbers are up again, said Houchang 
Khatami an, associate professor in horticulture 
forestry and recreational resources. 

Khatami an is adviser to the Baha'f College 
Club. 

"Basically, it's a religion that believes that 
there's only one God and that all the different 
religions have come from that God," 
Etzenhouser said. 

"Through the different religions, God guided 
them through the ages. 

"We believe all the religions are true and have 
come at different times to serve different needs 
of the world at that time. 

"Baha'f is the most recent." 



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Support Your Local 
Brewery! 



Finally... a real alternative. Fresh brewed 

beer and home-style cooking. Not to 

mention live music every week. 

Check cut this entertainment ... 

Tonight: 
Steve Strong and the Strength 

And remember, Tuesday u 
Winn & Pitcher Night! 

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Also: 

4 Pint Growlers for $7 

and Beer to Go! 

In Westlooe 





Heather Walks Amy Shay Cher! Parr 

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4 Q Thurmday. April 14. 1994 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Containers aid campus safety 



"Only on* or 
two 

individuals 
novo boon 
stuck by 



since 
tho program 4 
bogan In 

Stive Galitzer 

industrial 
Hygtenist 



Oriaja* 

When campus custodians 
empty trash cans, they used 
to encounter unnoticeable 
dangers, but not anymore. 

In 1991, Steve Galitzer, 
industrial hygienist in the 
department of public safety, 
started a Sharps Disposal 
Program at K-Scate to pro- 
vide containers for the prop- 
er disposal of sharp objects. 

Three years later, 
Galitzer said he has seen a 
positive change in the acci- 
dent reports because of the 
program. 

"Only one or two indi- 
viduals have been stuck by 
needles since the program 
began in 1991." Galitzer 
said. 

Needles, syringes, razor 
blades and scalpel blades 
used to be thrown in the 
trash cans, placing the cus- 



todians at risk, Galitzer said. 

Before the program 
began, people like science 
students, architects or lab 
professors threw razor 
blades and needles from 
experiments and projects 
into the trash. 

Custodians were then in 
danger of injury by the 
sharp materials in the trash 
cans, Galitzer said. 

The department of public 
safety led initiation of the 
program because of its 
responsibility for all safety 
at the University. 

"We work with any 
issues related to public safe- 
ty including student and 
employment safety." 

The sharps containers are 
now located in laboratories 
and buildings on campus 
that regularly use syringes 
or needles. 

"We give them to chem- 



istry, biology and any kind 
of research lab where any 
kind of science ts done. We 
also give them to Lafenc, 
occasionally to some labs at 
the Vet Med Center and to 
the Rec Center," Galitzer 
said. 

Galitzer said there was a 
great need for the program 
on campus to prevent 
injuries and accidents to the 
employees. 

"One or two custodians a 
month came upon a needle 
and were stuck by it. We 
couldn't convince people 
who were using the sharp 
objects to dispose of them 
properly, so we came upon a 
Sharps Disposal Program." 

The department of public 
safety obtained plastic con- 
tainers from the Food 
Service and Housing and 
covered each of them with a 
bright orange biohazard 



label. 

People can take advan- 
tage of the sharps disposal 
program by removing the 
top of a disposal container 
and dropping the razor blade 
or needle inside. 

After the containers are 
full of razors and needles 
and other biohazardous 
sharp materials. Amy 
Ratzcnberger, employee in 
the department of public 
safety at Ward Hall and 
senior in industrial engineer- 
ing, collects them and 
replaces them with new con- 
tainers. 

A medical waste compa- 
ny then picks up the sealed 
and packaged waste materi- 
als and incinerates them. 

"The needles and 
syringes are melted together 
so they can't be used again," 
Patricia flooding, nurse at 
Lafene. said. 



Crime boss killed in 
Russian 'mafiya' war 



MOSCOW — Gunners burst 
into the apartment of a reputed 
crime boss and killed the man and 
his wife in bed, the latest murders in 
a mob war that has broken out in 
the Russian capital. 

Criminal gangs have flourished 
in the chaos that followed the col- 
lapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, 
and gunbattles, car bombings and 
assassinations have become nearly 
routine as "mafiya" groups carve up 
their turf. 

Mobsters have elbowed their 
way into Russia's business world, 
killing dozens of businessmen last 
year arid extorting millions of dol- 
lars through protection rackets. 

With the stakes rising, organized 
crime groups increasingly are tar- 
geting each other. 



Suicide note found 
after pilot attacks 2 



MEMPHIS, Tenn. — An off- 
duty pilot accused of using ham- 
mers and a spear gun to attack the 
crew of a cargo jet during a flight 
was planning to commit suicide, a 
court document said. 

The off-duty Federal Express 
pilot. Auburn Calloway, 42, is 
charged in an FBI complaint with 
endangering an airliner. 

He remains in serious condition 
in a Memphis hospital with injuries 
suffered in a bloody fight with the 
DC- 1 0' s three-man crew. 

The assigned pilot managed to 
safely land the big jet, heavily 
loaded with cargo and fuel for a trip 
from Memphis to California, while 
two injured crew members fought 
with their attacker. 

a Nets rsvsals Calloway 
planned to commit suicide 

An FBI affidavit filed with a 
request to search Calloway's 
Memphis apartment says a note was 
found aboard the plane. 

"The contents of this note indi- 
cate the high potential that 
Calloway planned to commit sui- 
cide on the flight and also indicate 
thai Calloway may have made 
financial arrangements to take care 
of dependents and family members 
in connection with his planned sui- 

Vatican says 
girls can be 
altar servers 
during mass 



cide," the affidavit said. 

It said Federal Express officials 
told the FBI that "Calloway had 
made changes in insurance benefi- 
ciaries concerning insurance that he 
had with the company." 

a Federal Express refuses to 
comment on attacker's motive. 

Federal Express has refused to 
comment on the attacker's motive 
or what he planned to do with the 
plane if he got control of it. 

But Frederick Smith, chief exec- 
utive officer, has said he believes 
the attacker was bent on killing 
himself. 

"It's clear the guy was trying to 
commit suicide. The guy just went 
berserk," Smith told The Associated 
Press during an interview on an 
unrelated topic. 

The DC- 10. with Calloway as its 
lone passenger, took off from 
Memphis bound for San Jose. Calif. 

The crew put the plane through 
dives and turns in an attempt to 
knock their attacker off balance. 

For a short time, the airliner was 
on automatic pilot as the crew 
members struggled to get the 
attacker out of the cockpit. 

Pilot David Sanders, 49, blood- 
ied in the fight, managed to land the 
DC- 10 unassisted while his col- 
leagues continued their struggle all 
the way to the ground, authorities 
said. 



aooca a o o ooooo oca ooo o ooc 



PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS 
HAVE YOU CONFUSED? 

Ask all your questions at a 

Presidential Run-off Debate 

Tuesday, April 19, 7:30 p.m. 

Big 8 Room 




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VATICAN CITY — Both girls 
and boys will he officially allowed 
to act as altar servers at Roman 
Catholic Masses, the Vatican said 
Wednesday. 

It will be up to individual bishops 
to decide whether girls can serve in 
their jurisdictions, papal representa- 
tive Joaquin Navarro said. 

Altar servers, generally aged 8 (o 
14, assist the priest while he is cele- 
brating Mass, lighting candies, 
preparing the altar or handing him 
water or wine. 

In many American parishes, girls 
have been altar servers for years. 

Prelates from the United States 
and other countries suggested in 
1987 formally opening up the post of 
altar server as part of their urgings to 
the church to give women a greater 
role. The Vatican began studying the 
possibility a year ago. 

Archbishop Francis Stafford of 
Denver, Colo., applauded the 
change, saying it would ease confu- 
sion by Catholics who expected such 
a decision for some time. 

"My hope is that those on both 
sides of this sometimes controversial 
issue will now unite in faithfulness 
to the guidance of the Holy Father," 
he said in a statement. 

Navarro said that in making the 
change, the Vatican decided that a 
church law allowing lay people to 
serve at Mass should be interpreted 
as referring to both men and women. 

Navarro said the decision 
resolved a pastoral question and did 
not involve doctrinal issues, such as 
those barring women from becoming 
priests. 



Healing the Planet 

featuring 

Mark Cherrmgton 

of Earthwatch 

Tuesday, April 19 
7:30pw 
Umberger Hall 105 

Kansas State University 




Avtandil Chicklaidze. a 38-year- 
old ethnic Georgian, was killed at 7 
a.m. Tuesday along with his wife by 
gunmen who fired automatic 
weapons, the ITAR-Tass news 
agency reported. Their child was 
shot in the arm but survived. 

Chikhlaidze, also known by his 
nickname "Kvezho," reportedly 
worked for a company that sells for- 
eign cars, ITAR-Tass said. 

Reputed mob chieftain. Otari 
Kvantrishvili, was shot to death as 
he was leaving a public bath and 
sauna complex in a central Moscow 
district reportedly under his control. 

The business newspaper 
Commersant, citing unidentified 
police sources, described 
Kvantrishvili* s death as a profes- 
sional hit. Commersant also said he 
was carrying nearly $30,000 in 
cash. 



(H I SI K )NS*ibtuit ( ir.id School? 



Graduate School 



;il Seminar 



riuirsil;i\. April 14 
4:30 p.m. 
Union 2()C> 

In \ A S \iiibiiwiith>r\ 



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1974 CHRYSLER SKI BOAT A 103 HP OUTBOARD 

1967 MARINETTE, ORIGINAL CONDITION, ALL MARINE ALUMINUM, 

318 CHRYSLER 223 HP 

1986 CONDOR TX19 JET BOATWTTH 454 CHEV 

1 972 LARSON 20' WITH 350 CHEVltO 

1979 19' BAJA A 200 HP JOHNSON 

1988 7-EBCOMONTECARLOAUOHPEYINRUDE 
1963 13-CHRESTUNERA73 HP JOHNSON 

1989 JETSIAR SKI BOAT 30 HP SUZUKI INBOARD 
1973 14'RtCHUNE ALUMINUM A 10 HP EVJNRUDS 

1973 COLEMAN POPUP CAMPER 

1976 NU-WA 23' TRAVEL TRAILER 

1971 SCOUT 16' TRAVEL TRAILER 

H'NEWHORIZONTAL TRAVEL TRAILER 

1991 CAB OVER SUP IN CAMPER 

1977 FL25qCCODESSEr(4WHEELATV) 

■ignmenb Wilt Be Received 9 A.m Friday Till W A.m. Saturday 

No Small Hem, Boats & Cimpes Sell At 1 1:00 Sharp, Auctkmeert 

Not Retpomlbk For litmt Withdrawn From Auction, 

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337-3500 539-3802 

YOUR MARKETING ADVANTAGE! 





J 



mti^\m*totoWwtf\ikttnM»Tvito 
disappear? How will we feed ourselves H the world! 
population continues to grow exponentially? How 
many species can we afford to low before the Earth's 
ecosystems collapse? How can we repair our damaged 
planet? 

Even as you read this, there are scientists, researchers, 
and ordinary people working on the front lines of the 
world's most pressing environmental problems. As the 
editor of the International magazine Earthwatck 
Mark Cherrington has worked with and written about 
hundreds of these projects In every part of the world. 
HIi slide show features reports from those front tines, 
showing that we can solve many of these problems 
wfth understanding of how the Earth works. 

Among the topics he addresses are... 

Rainforests Endangered Species 

Mobal Warming Food Production 



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L«arn the difi*r*nc* between management and 
leadership, and how to us* both to accomplish your 
professional goals. Begin to develop a personal mission 
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strategies that effective leaders us* daily. 

Angela G. Hayes, M.S., Coordinator, Employee 

A ■■ is! a nee Program and Bui in ess Consultation ReiourcM, 

will lead this three-hour workshop. 

Tktee continuing education unite (contact hount tor noma) 
arm approved lor RN'a, LPN't, wocial worker* and other*. 
The cost it $21 tor thit workthap which begin* at 12:45 
p.m. April 20 in Manhattan, April 27 in Junction City. 

To register complete and mail registration loitn with 
payment or call 507-4326. 



♦ 



PAWNEE 

Mental Health Services 







DAY'S ENTERTAINMENT SCENE 

^TKg^-n^irtnlMF^ItaMttilbMlnLEiMSaikin 

». «f«tt Ct** 
^<rf»aWoi1ir(f*siQ«iJioner^^ 

(acoustic guter) - • P «. ri Union Stafcn 





11 






IVERSIONS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 







CROSSWORD 



Eugene Sheffu 



ACROSS 
1 Sal« 

pftchM? 
SWItnaa- 

Md, ate 

Tweaty 
• Track 

•vent 

12 Kilauaa 
ourtlow 

13 Cantab'* 
competitor 

14 Concern- 
log 

15 Augury 

16 Wanton 
the lam 

17 Tennis 
term 

18 Dentist's 
target 

20 Reacted 
in honor 

22 The 
Greatest" 

23Wea,to 
a Scot 

24 Gladys 
Knight's 
backup 

27 Bug 
catcher 
of a sort 

32 Pitching 
•tat. 

33 This — 
recording* 

34 Freudian 
concept 

35 Annoying 

F 



wound 
38 Desire 
» TV Tarzan 

Ron 
40 Matter- 

horn, e.g. 
42 Actor 

Granger 
45 Backyard 

chatter 

49 Garage job 

50 Firewood? 

52 Common 
French 
verb 

53 Pour — 
(exagger- 
ate) 

54 Shooter 
ammo 

55 Implement 

56 1992 
Robin 
Williams 
movie 



67 Sun Yet- - 
66 Rational 
DOWN 

1 Whodunit 
. essential 

2 "-line- 
man for 
the county" 

3 Eternally 

4 Year-end 
depart- 
ment store 
staff 

5 Great 

6 Chicken- 
king link 

7 Building 
extension 

• Bad 
atmo- 
sphere 

• Book 
feature 

10 Canal 
zone 



■11 Be inclined 
19Cappor 

Capon* 
21 dec's 

kilter 

24 Verve 

25 George's 
brother 

26 He's a 
news 
caster? 

28 Baton 
Rouge 
sen 

29 Double- 
curved 



Solution time: 23 mine. 




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Yastarday's answer 4-14 



30 Future 
flamingo 

31 Caviar 
base 

36 Barkin and 
Burstyn 

37 Catcher's 
place? 

38 Unex- 
pected 
defeats 

41 "Behold I" 

42 Move like 
a butterfly 

43 Jam 
ingredient? 

44 Shrill barks 

46 Old portico 

47 Unyielding 

48 Soccer 
legend 

51 Compre- 
hend 
W 




CRYPTOQUIP 



DJOH YSNYWDPASF PZYFWUPP 

JX ZJQJNWCO AJQXWNU: "OX'D 

JFF DW QSX JCH HNOPH " 

YseasfdaVs Cryofoqulp: SAID LON CHANEY, THE MAN 
OF A THOUSAND FACES, "I'M NOT MYSELF TODAY." 
Today's Cryptoojuip Oue: H equals D 



Brooks and Dunn to perform 



■H Q O W l PATTMMO W 

ofipai 

Dust off your ropers, pull out 
the Stetson and get ready to scoot 
those boots. Brooks and Dunn are 
coming to Bramlage Coliseum 
Friday night. 

With two albums — "Hard 
Workin' Man," a certified double 
platinum, and "Brand New Man," 
a triple platinum — and four No. 
1 singles — "Brand New Man," 
"My Nexi Broken Heart," "Neon 
Moon" and the popular dance 
track "Boot Scootin' Boogie" — 
Brooks and Dunn are among 
country music's most successful 
duos. 

Recording artists Aaron 
Tippin and Toby Keith will open. 



country 



Show starts 8 p.m. Friday 
al Bramlage Coliseum. 
Tickets are $20 and can be 
purchased In Manhattan at 
Bramlage, Town Center 
information booth, K-State 
Union Bookstore and 
McCain Box Office. 



SNIPPETS 

BEWARE OF DOLPHIN 

A mm who was bitten by tn Ocean World dolphin 
was awarded $20,000 by i jury. 
The man testified hot arms went retting on ■ fence 
during a mfl when another visitor touched the 
dolphin^Nfl Bssjeajpjke and bit him on 




rewarded $15,000 In 
damages and 15,000 m puffih« damageav 
Asked on the jury form how they would app 
blame, the jurors said: "Defendant Ocean world, 4 
percent; plaintiff Ernest Coraliuzzo, 96 percent* 

N. STEWART ANPEHSOWCoJteflten 



Source: Aaaocialed Prec* 

CALVIN. AND HOBBES 



DOUBLE-BARRELED daiyl busi/coukian 




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LUST TIME 5 ' 





JIM'S JOURNAL 






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H»5 «SH0E/.i\CE WtlS miK>. 




Illinois bastard, bra collector need help 



Writs to Cassandra, 
116 KedzieHall. 

Manhattan, Kan 
66506. 



Dear Cassandra, 

I work with this girl who 
discriminates against me 
because of a circumstance 
that is totally beyond my 
control. This particular girl 
discriminates against me 
because I am from Illinois. 

She says that she is from 
Wisconsin and lhat every- 
one in Wisconsin hates 
people from Illinois. She 
calls me "FIB," which 
stands for "F**king Illinois 
Bastards." 

Signed, 

FIB, Friendly Illinois Boy 



Dear FIB, 

I would not worry much 
about her comments. Look 
where they are coming 
from, a person from 
Wisconsin. If she starts crit- 
icizing the quality of dairy 
products you purchase, then 
you have something to 
worry about. 

DearCassie, 

For the last five years, I 
have amassed a wide cot* 
lection that many may find 
strange or perverted. I have 
collected 24 bras. Most of 
them I have found, but 



some have been given to 
me by their owners. They 
are all shapes and sizes. I 
don't wear them. I just col- 
lect them. 1 guess I could be 
collecting stamps, but they 
just don't interest me. 

Thank you, 
Bra-zarre 

Dear Bra-zarre , 

I have one question. 
Stamp collections are kept 
in books. Butterfly collec- 
tions are kepi in cases. How 
would you display a bra 
collection? 



APRIL 14. 1994 



Book offers 
quirky advice 
for travelers 




afejtai 

If you thought you were too 
broke, too uninformed, or 
just not interested in going 
to Europe, you might change 
your mind after reading "Let's 
Blow Thru Europe." 

"Let's Blow Thru Europe," published by 
Mustang Publishing, was written by Thomas 
Neenan and Greg Hancock. The book takes after 
the ever-popular "Let's Go" travel series, finds 
the cheap way to do everything and adds a sense 
of dry sardonic wit that has been compared to 
David Letterman's. 

Whether you want to 
go "across the pond" or 
not, this travel guide 
makes for hysterical 
reading. 

A typical traveling tip 
is one given about a 
street in Paris known as 
rue de la Huchette. The 
authors describe it as an area of Greek restau- 
rants serving "greasy ... pig blubber on the end of 
a stick" (sbish kebabs) and seafood that, after 
being kept in storefront windows, will give a 
prospective gourmand "some exotic French para- 
sites camping in [the] small intestine." 

Munich's Frauenkirche, the largest church in 
the city, is aptly described as "a church all right. 
It's big, it's empty ... pretty bare. OK, that's the 
churches out of the way." 

Written with us college students and our bud- 
gets in mind, "Let's Blow Thru Europe" not only 
is chock full of witty, well-written recommenda- 
tions and warnings like how ugly Amsterdam's 
hookers are, but it also finds the cheap way to do 
things without necessarily making you complete- 
ly homeless. 

The authors recommend sleeping anywhere 
from bed-and-breakfasts to train stations. They 
recommend using American Express traveler's 
checks for currency, suggest some travel agents 
who specialize in European destinations, and 
even describe how to get along with Canadians 
(rule of thumb: If you spot maple leaves on 
someone, that person is Canadian, in spite of the 
American appearance). 

One problem with the book is its suggested 
itinerary. By following what the book says, one 
would visit (in this order) London, Amsterdam, 
Paris, Nice, Munich, Rome, the Greek island of 
Corfu, Athens and then head home in only 15 
days. Such speedy traveling can be done by, 
sleeping almost exclusively on trains and ferries 
— not the best advice for obviously American 
tourists who make easy targets for thieves. 

The authors justify this suggestion: "You're* 
not on a vacation, you're on a mission." 
Nonetheless. I'd recommend taking the time to 
enjoy each city and, yes, sleep if you have the 
money. Why go to a city but depart before seeing 
it? 

Descriptions of Moscow, Prague, Budapest. 
Vienna, Venice, Florence, Dublin and even 
Cancan, Mexico, are included for day trips along 
the way or, in Cancun's case, just for shear hedo- 
nism. 

College is a time of life that is rather ripe for 
travel for some people. With long summer vaca- 
tions, students sometimes have that last chance 
to see the globe before entering the "real world" 
of year-round toil. Europe is quite a popular des- 
tination, and "Let's Blow Thru Europe" can keep 
the college traveler informed and humored 
throughout marvelous adventures to the Old 
World. 



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The K-State Singers 
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McCain Auditorium 8 p.m. 

Tickets available from the McCain Box Office, 532-6428 




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Entry Deadline: 

Thursday, April 14 at 5 p.m. 




Ilntt'i ;il I In 1 Ui'C ! 

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12 



Thursday April 14. 1004 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Bill may lead to smoking ban 



, Manhattan stores and restaurants may 
have to adjust their policies on smoking 
indoors. 

Kansas Attorney General Bob 
Stephan joined the attorney generals of 
22 other states in supporting the Smoke- 
Free Environment Act recently. 

The federal legislation was initiated 
to reduce the health risks caused by sec- 
ond-hand smoke. 

According to the American Medical 
Association, second-hand smoke kills 
more than 50,000 Americans each year 
through cancer and heart disease. 

If passed, the Smoke-Free 
Environment Act would require smok- 
ing in public buildings to be banned or 
limited to designated rooms with sepa- 
rate ventilation systems. 

The bill defines public buildings as 
those which are entered by 10 or more 
people per week. The act is currently in 
subcommittee and may be voted on in 



the next week. 

Owners and managers of Manhattan 
restaurants, who may be forced to elimi- 
nate designated smoking areas, said they 
have mixed emotions about the bill. 

Libby Oberdorf, Westloop 
McDonald's store manager, said the 
does not intend to eliminate smoking 
areas in her store until she is required to 
do so. 

"We have a lot of customers who do 
smoke," Oberdorf said. "But we'd have 
to do it if the bill's passed" 

The McDonald's Corporation has 
already announced its support of the 
Smoke-Free Environment Act, as well 
as the National Council of Chain 
Restaurants. 

Harry's Uptown Supper Club owner 
Julie Haynes said she wouldn't expect 
to lose any customers if the act is 
passed. 

"Very few of my customers smoke 
anymore anyway. It's just a considera- 
tion," Haynes said. "People are more 



conscious than they were 20 or 30 years 
ago." 

Harry's Uptown does not offer a non- 
smoking section. Haynes said the ceil- 
ings are so high that smoke moves 
throughout the restaurant even if smok- 
ing is restricted to a certain area. 

"We would have to adjust to whatev- 
er laws are made, but it could cost me a 
lot of money," she said. "Some of my 
clients only smoke when they come in 
for a cocktail before dinner." 

Customer flow at Giorgio's Italian 
Restaurant would most likely not be 
slowed, John Laugh I in. store manager, 
said. 

"TRe law is not going to affect us 
much here. Manhattan seems to be a 
non-smoking community, which is 
rare," Laughlin said. "But as far as our 
other stores are concerned, it probably 
will." 

The attorney generals of Iowa and 
Oklahoma have also given their support 
of the Smoke-Free Environment Act 



Clinton questioned on Whitewater 



WASHINGTON — For 

once. President Clinton 
enjoyed a speech about 
Whitewater, although the 
mood didn't last for long. Not 
when he heard a suggestion 
that he hadn't done home- 
work enough to answer all 
the questions in the case. 

"The implication of your 
remarks, sir, is that ... I 
should stop being president 
and do my homework on this 
issue," he snapped at a ques- 
tioning editor. 

The two faces toward 
Whitewater, one beaming, 
one stern and irked, were dis- 
played when the president 
spoke first to the broadcast 
news establishment, then, on 
Wednesday, to the American 



Society of Newspaper 
Editors. 

Il was a sequence that dra- 
matized his nagging problem 
with the whole controversy, a 
case that's become like the 
low-grade ailment that 
doesn't take hold as a real 
sickness but doesn't go away, 
either. 

First, Clinton delighted in 
the pointed humor of 
Garrison Keillor, the author 
and radio humorist who 
called Whitewater a yuppie 
sort of scandal. 

"It's all about perception, 
and it's all superficial," 
Keillor told the Radio and 
Television Correspondents 
Association at a black-tie din- 
ner Tuesday night. 

His audience was the tar- 
get of his monologue. 



"As Will Rogers said, all I 
know is what I read in the 
papers, so Whitewater is a 
mystery to me," he told the 
broadcasters. "As is most of 
what happens in Washing- 
ton." 

Keillor said Washington 
journalists are treating the sit- 
uation the way his parents 
treated him when he was 16 
years old. always assuming 
he must be doing something 
wrong. Elsewhere in the 
country, he said, people don't 
think that way about Clinton. 

The president joked, gin- 
gerly, about the case, too. 
"Most of you have spent a lot 
more time on my taxes than 
your own," he said. Then-he 
sat back to revet in the 
Keillor routine. 



Administration wants to shift forest protection 



WASHINGTON — The Clinton 
administration wants court approval 
for a plan to protect three-fourths of 
the Northwest's old- growth forests 
and end a three-year-old logging 
ban on millions of acres where spot- 
ted owls live. 

The government today intends to 
ask U.S. District Judge William 
Dwyer in Seattle to lift the logging 



injunction, said Will Stelle. assis- 
tant director of the White House 
Office on Environmental Policy. 

"This is one of the most signifi- 
cant events in forest management in 
the United States since the estab- 
lishment of the national forest sys- 
tem," Stelle said. 

Clinton's plan would protect 75 
percent to 80 percent of the remain- 
ing old-growth forests in Oregon, 
Washington and Northern 



California, Assistant . Interior 
Secretary George Frampton Jr. told 
The Associated Press on 
Wednesday. 

"We want to get the (logging) 
injunction lifted as soon as possible. 
We will ask him to do it as fast as 
possible consistent with due 
process," Frampton said. 

Logging has been banned in 
forests with the threatened northern 
spotted owl since May 1991 when 



Dwyer ruled the Bush administra- 
tion was deliberately violating U.S. 
environmental laws protecting fish 
and wildlife. 

The Bush administration failed 
in repeated attempts to craft a plan 
that was legally acceptable to 
Dwyer, and the judge gave the 
Clinton administration until today 
to come up with a new plan. 

Stelle said the plan is largely 
unchanged from the government's 



most recent preferred plan calling 
for logging to fall to about 1.1 bil- 
lion board feet a year in forests with 
spotted owls. 

That is about one-quarter the 
level of the 1980s but more than 
double the harvests that have been 
carried out since the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service declared the owl a 
threatened species in June 1990. 

A board foot is one foot square 
by one inch thick. It takes about 



10.000 board feet to build a typical 
single family home. 

"Nobody is happy that the pro- 
jected sales levels are as low as they 
are," Stelle said. "But 12 years of 
major mismanagement of national 
forestlands has left us fundamental- 
ly with not a lot to work with." 

"The whole reason for this plan 
is that those harvest levels were not 
sustainable and were illegal," he 
said. 



f The K-State Allftfifi 
accepting applica 



i AssAM 



ion is now 
three at- 



large posrflwp 

All University* 

Homecortjjjag 

Committee »j2» 



Applications may be picked up in 
2323 Anderson Ave., Su 
Application deadline is Monday, April 1 



& 



mni Office, 



4± 



AUDITIONS 



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K-STATE SINGERS 

\i <u r-, Sopi lIHi i, Alii i U'lli >r |»,Inn 

MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

\lu-.h -ins 1 hr t ivihl 

WOMEN'S CLEE CLUB 



\ItiNi, in" I hr i 



\|Mll 12 



We Tame the Tough Ones 





LASSIFIEDS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



OUR BASIC RATI 

To run 20 worts or hat lor on* rjsy 
is ». For each port war 20 tdd 20* 
par word CaM MMM tor t 
deyr 



MOW TO MY 

Cle*sJ*K) ad* rrxjatb* placed t» UcaHasMsmsjIbipaWIn 

noon thadw baton tadsttfMH eAameaiaftsMywaman 

runs. Ctoadtod display to* natt bs wt rtfNd account wMi Student 

pujced by 4 pjn.lwo working day* PubafeBona Caeh, enact, UsMwCsrd 
betommdr 



1Mb dan Owed runs. 



or Visa an 



Call 532-6555 
to place your classified. 



000 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 



0101 



Anneunc«m»nt« 



'HOWARD STERNS' need 
ed for co-hoiti or pro- 
duction start po»i!ioni 
for the talk- radio thow 
*A Purple Affair ' Appli 
cations evailsble at Iha 
SGA Office or DB92 Hu 
dioi (McCain 317). 

ACCC AO ALUMNI RE- 
UNION Bat. April 
It, 2:30p m Col. 
I a a* Farm. For mora 
Information contact 
Tarry Powelson or Bac 
Nilges, (31«)365-5116 

ADVANCED FLIGHT Train- 

ing. Multionglne prl- 
vata. commarclal. or 
ATP In Twin Comertch* 
with HSI. RMI, GPS. 
Storm Scope. Hugh lr 
vi n, 539-31 29. 

COME FLY with ua, I Stat* 
Flying Club hat four air 
plane*. For boat p tic at 
Clll Sam Knipp, 539 
8193 aftar S:30p m 

DON'T LOSE track of 



Buy a Campua Direc- 
tory today. Available In 
103 Kodile. S2 with 
■tudant ID, S3 25 with 
faculty/ eteff ID. $4 oth- 
er*. Ca mpua G 



□lease purchase from 
KSU Office Supplie* at 
the Union Bookstore. 

INDIGO GIRLS "Swamp 
Ophelia.' On tela 5/10 
For mora Information, 
dial 1-80O-457-3027 



Found ad* can ha 
pleeed free far rare a 



FOUND: SET of keys on 
•Idawalk at 14tn and 
Fairchild. 539-6062. 

OMl 



Par»onala 



We require a form of 
picture tO (KSU, drlv 
• r • llcenee Of other) 
whan placing a per- 



MEN OF Acacia- Good luck 
at greek game*. Love 
your Alpha XI Coeches- 
Janelle. Amy, Julia, 
Gretchen and Tiff any 

SHANTA, KEEP your chin up) 
Love Ye. 

0M| 



Parttwa-n-Mor* 



CREATE HOT w*f memo 
rlea with your next par- 
ty. Wat N Wild Mobile 
Hoi Tub Rental!. Year 
round availability 537 

int. 



10J0 



HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 



For Rami- 

APARTMENTS. MOBILE 
Home*, furnished, on 
furnlahad, quiet aur- 
rourtdinga tor study. 10 
Or 12-month leaaai. 
June or Aug. No pat*. 
537-8389 

AUGUST LEASE- next to 
campu*. acroti Martatt 
and Goodnow Hall 
11632 CI ail in) one/ 
two-bedroom. 
539-2702 evening*/ 



AVAILABLE JUNE 1 Urge 
two-bad room apart 
mam. 6400 SIB Oieg* 
water/ treeh paid, dieh 



, garbage di*po 
**l. low utllitia*. 

776-2393 

AVAILABLE NOW, sum- 
mar and (all. Vary nice 
(wo, three and 
four-bedroom apart 
manl complex** and 
houaaa. Naar campu* 
with great price* 
637-1668, 537-2919. 

FOR AUG. Nan to KSU. De- 
luxe Iwo-bidroom 
apartment, S485 Pay 
only electric. 539-2482, 
■ftar 4p.m. 

FOR RENT, two room*, 
non-tmoklng, partly 
furnlahad, (rath paid, 
one-fourth utilltie*. 
Cloaa to campua, call 
537-9764 

LARGE TWO and 

three-bedroom apart- 
ment* doe* to campua, 
Aggievlll* *nd City 
Part. Available June 1, 
536-1713. 

NEAR KSU tummer laate 
only. Nice two-bed- 
room baaement apart 
mtnt. S300, 539-2482, 
oftor 4p m. 

ONE-BEDROOM STUDIO 
in complex. 1219 Claflin 
next lo campu*. S3I0 
plu* electric, plu* d» 
poirt. Aug. year lea**, 
no pet*. 637-1 (80. 

TWO. THREE and 

four-bedroom . Very 
good condition. Wind- 
ow air, go* beet and 
carpeted Available in 
June 537-7334, 

TWO STORY duplex with 
patio. One and one-half 
block* aaat of Ford Hall, 
two full bathroom*, 
four off-atreet parking 
itall*. 1401 McCain 
MOO par month. 
539-7993 

TWO BEDROOM, LUXURI- 
OUS epartmant* naar 
campu* and oppoilt* 
city park at 1200 Fre- 
mont for June or Au- 
gust. Carpeted, central 
air, cHahwao h er and dfa- 
poaal. No pata. $466. 
S37442S 

UNUSUALLY LARGE near 



room, two bath edla 



ilh edia- 

beautffui 



139-0373 




814 THURSTON atudlo w»- 
tat/ train paid. No pets/ 
(mokar*. J una I lea**, 
S270 Call 539-6130. 

AVAILABLE IMME 

DIATELY, nice two bed 
room. 617 N, 12th, 
S575. witar, traah paid 
Clo*a to campua. 776 
3804. 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1. 
One-bedroom S3*0, 
two-bedroom $610 
1666 Collage Height*. 
Water/ tr*ah paid. Doe* 
to campu*. 776-3804. 



AUGUST LEASES 

•'riant A**. **n it in V 

•Ukw Hflfkl. 

L»r«f t Bedroom Haiti 

53 7-90*4 

Wr?kdari 9 a.m. -4:30 p m. 



AVAILABLE MAY 1, 
one-bedroom. 1024 
Lara ml* 1325 including 
all utililiet, ona-year 
la***, no pat*, AJeo one 
and two-bad room for 
Aug. th* Houalng Co. 
630-2266. 

AVAILABLE NOW, 

one-bedroom. 1022 
Suntet, S346. Water/ 
train paid. Cloie to 
campu*. 776-3804 

AVAILABLE NOW. lum- 
mer and fall. Vary nice 
two, three end 
four-bedroom apart- 
ment complex** and 
houaa*. Neer campu* 
with graat price* 
537-1 666, 537- 29 19 

AVAILABLE NOW, 

three -bedroom, cloaa 
to City Park. 300 N 
11th. S435 Upitaln 
unit Water/ trash paid. 
776-3804. 

AVAILABLE NOW, 

two-bedroom by City 
Park. 1026 Osage I486. 
Water/ tre*h paid. 
776-3604. 

AVAILABLE NOW. Spa- 
clou a two- bed room. 
CIom to campu*. 1829 



Collage Height! $680 
Water/ traah paid. 
776-3804. 

CHASE MANHATTAN 
APARTMENTS OFF- 
ERS YOU ALL THE 
COMFOHTS OF NEW: 

modem Interior*, di*h- 
washer*, microwave*, 
clubhouse with swim 
ming pool, aun deck, 
laundry, lounge, and 
workout fecllltla* In- 
cluding atalrmaeUr*. 
exerciee bike*, weight! . 
and TVl Occupancy 
naarlng 100 percent. 
Don't mi«* outl Call to- 
day! 776-3663. 

JUNE AND Aug. availabili- 
ty. One, two and 
four-bedroom 1017- 
1029 McCollum S3S5- 
$800 Cloaa to*c»mpui 
776-3804. 

LARGE TWO- three-bed- 
room apartment 10 
minute walk from Sea 
ton Hall With washer/ 
dryer 220 air condition, 
1650/ month. Call 
937-7142 (pet* a 
maybe). 

NOW LEASING for Aug. 
1001 Bluamont S7B0 
Very large two-bad- 
room, two bath. Nica 
unit*. Cloaa to Ag- 
glavHIe. 776-3604. 

ONE-BEDROOM AVAIL 
ABLE April 15 1322 
Laramie $325 All utlli- 
tia* paid. Cio*e to cam- 
pu*. 776-3804. 

ONE-BEDROOM BASE 
MENT apartment 820 
Oiaga $210 Availabla 
April 15 Water/ treah 
paid. 776-3804. 

OVERLOOK CAMPUS, two- 
bedroom , dlahwaaher, 
fireplace, laundry facili- 
ty. Available Aug- ' 
$810.537 2266 

PARK PLACB APART 



Ing one, two and 
three bedrooms 
636-2961. 

TWO-BEDROOM AVAIL 
ABLE In Jun*. 112SFre 
mont SS10. Traah paid 
Dlahwaihar. garbage 
disposal, laundry fee 11 1 
tie* on-site, Cloaa to 
City Park and Ag- 
gleville. 776^604. 

TWO-BEDROOM UNFUR- 
NISHED, two block* 



east of campu*. Avail 
able June I, 1984. On* 
year lease. $350/ 
month. 539-2116. 

TWO-BEDROOM, CLOSE 

to campua. Avallabl* 
Aug. 1, no pat*. 
539-2661 

TWO THREE-BEDROOMS 
one and one-half bath. 
central air, laundry, 
near campu*, available 
June Or Aug. 537-8800 

TWO, TWO- bedroom 
apartment*. $585 per 
month. One month de- 
posit Includea traah and 
lawn care. Waaher and 
dryer hook- up*, ap- 
pliance*, central air and 
heat, two full bath* 
Lease* begin May 1 or 
June 30. Carl 538-8800 

VERY NICE tour-badroom 
houaa available Mey 1. 
1817 Collage Heights, 
S1200 All utilities paid. 
Close to campu*. 
778-3804 

VERY NICE. Next to cam- 

fiu* One, two. three, 
our -bedroom houaaa 
and apartments with 
washer/ dryer central 
air S33S- $800 837-6643. 




FOR RENT: one or 
two- bedroom* of a 
haul*. Close to cam- 
pus. Rant $138. Laun- 
dry. June 1 leaea. Call 
Sara or Kelly at 
776-6740. 



FOUR-BEDROOM HOUSE. 
waat of campu*. central 
•lr, appliance*. For 
Juna 18800.637-1269. 

FOUR-BEDROOM UNFUR- 
NISHED house, June 
lea**. 539-1 875 

NON-DRINKING AND 
smoking, for two and 
three -bedroom piece* 
No pal*. Raforsncai. 
638-1664 



THREE-BEDROOM 

HOUSE, new wither/ 
dryer, dilhwaeher. cen- 
tral air, heal, Closa to 
campua. 639-2914. 

II 



OUIT PAVINO RINTl 

Nica older home cur- 
rently duplex. Three 
bedrooms plus and stu- 
dio with HW/ solar. 
Converts lo large home 
or May a* i* *nd EARN 
RENT. Clot* to park, 
downtown and KSU. 
Student! take Ihii to 
your parent*. 1 800 
593-0519. After 7p.m. 
Priced In the 50'*. 



14X70 THREE-BEDROOM 
Mobil* Home, one-half 
acre lanced for hot hi. 
Furnlahad/ unfurnlahed 
available June I, 
637-7901. 



ForaVata- 



1882 CHAMPION Mobil* 
Home, three-bedroom, 
two bath, central heat 
and air, dock, etorage 

•had, *ppii»nc*s, 
off-*tr«*t parking, ap- 
proximately $325/ 
month, located In Colo- 
nial Garden*, 776-3433 

COUNTRYSIDE BROKER 
AGE will aell your mo- 
bile home for you. Wa 
have fantastic results. 
Wa do Our own financ- 
ing. Cell 639-2326. 



TIRED OF paying rant? Buy 
my 70X12. two-bed 
room. 1987 Skyline Mo 
bile Home tot only 
64000, ce" 539-2328. 



FEMALE ROOMMATE for 
•umrnar needed lo 
•hare fully furniihad 
two-bedroom apart 
mam. $250/ month. Wa- 
ter/ traah paid. No pet*. 
776-9869 Heather 

MALE ROOMMATE need- 
ad for summer. Own 
bedroom, Nice I Next to . 
campu*, 6150 plu* utill- 
tle*. Call Dave at 
687-0726 

MALE ROOMMATES need 
ed to ahare a three bed 
room house Cell 539 
3726 , **k for Mirk. 

NEED FEMALES to share a 
summer sublee** on a 
three- bedroom apart- 
ment. Furnished, water/ 
traah paid. Very cloaa 
to campu*. Call 
776-2286 

NON- SMOKER TO iha'* 
four-bedroom house, 
cloaa to campua, SIM • 
month plua one-fourth 
light cable end phone 
Mult have a sans* of 
humor. Call 776-0847 
or 632-2244. 

NON-SMOKING FEMALE 
roommate wanted to 
ihere vary nica two- 
bedroom apartment 
with Architecture major 
•tudant, atartlng In 
June or Aug. own 
room, wathtr/ dryer. 
$220 ■ month plu* one 
helf Utllitia*. Cell 539 
1874 or leave 



Ih roe-bad room, pool 
aide apartment with 
two mala roommate!. 
Fall 94- apring 96. $210/ 
month plu* one -third 
utllitloa. Non-*mok*r. 
Call Brian 532-5184 or 
Mike 632-6482. 

WANTED NON -SMOKING 

and non-drinking mala 
for basement furnlahad 
private bedroom. Walk 
to KSU. S1S0 Share 
utilrfie*. 539-1554 

WANTED: ROOMMATE to 
•hara a two room apart 
mant in Crastwood 
Apartment* 6220 a 

month. Vary now and 
very nice. On top of 
Stage Hill. Call 539 
4937, ask for David. 



1004 MCCOLLUM St., iunv 
mer lublease, two large 
bedroom I. On* block 
from Durtand Hall. I860 
plu* utilities. Cell 667- 



NON SMOKING ROOM- 
MATE naadad. Baee 

mant In a hou**. Own 
room. Free cable. $100 
plu* hi H utilities. Call 
638-7087 
NON-SMOKING ROOM 
MATE to ahare house. 
Own room, own bath, 
own living room, waah- 
er, dryer, central air, 
yard. Mac, 7766723. 

ROOMMATE NEEDED to 

•hara five-bedroom 
hou**. $150 per month 
plu* one-fifth utlllli**. 
Cloaa to campua. Call 
637-1631. 

ROOMMATE WANTED: 
male or female Share 



1828 COLLEGE Height* 
Summer *ubleet* 

two-bedroom, tufty fur 
niihed, dlahwaaher, 
central elr. Up to four 
people. Rant negoti- 
able. Call r~ 



AVAILABLE M1D-MAY- 
Aug. Subieeeera need- 
ed for two- bod room 
apartment. Cloia to 

campu*/ Aggieville Fur- 
nlahad with waaher and 
dryer. Rer 
776-4036. 

AVAILABLE MID-MAY 
through lata August 
One-half block from 
campu*, Hunting Ave- 
nue partial ry furnished, 
wsahar. dryer, ana-haff 
utllitia*, rant negoti- 
able 776-4031. 

CHEAP! FEMALE naadad 
for summer. S120 par 
month, one-third utlli- 
tia*. Your own room, 
one block from e»m. 
PUS 537-3846 

CHEAP Rf NT for turn mar 
•ublaaae. Vary nice 
apartment. Ona block 
from campua. Only 
$130 • month. Naadad 
either May or June 
until Aug- 1. female 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, April 14, 1904 4 O 



Collegian Classifieds 



roommate pral»rr«d 
Call 776-14*5. Ait for 
Oku, 

DESPERATELY NEED fe- 
male to lubteeee Wobd- 
wsy, four-bad loom 
Halt prlcel 1100/ 
month. New pool. Avail 
abla May la Laurie. 



!' 



DESPERATELY SEEKING 
summer sub leaser* for 
two-bedroom apart 
mam. Close to campus 
and Aggieville. No rea- 
sonable offer refueedl 
537-3531 

female Roommate 

naadad. Mid-May (o 
July 31. May rant paid. 
Woo** ay Apart rtient* 
(ISO plu) one fourth 
utllltia*. Call Ann 
017-1489. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
na*d*d. Available 
mid-May to July 31. 
May rant ia paid. Wood- 
way Apartmanta. $150 
plua ono-third utilitte* 
Call Michelle 776-71S1. 

FEMALES NEEDED for 

three-bedroom Watar. 
trash paid. S1507 month 
plua one- third utllltiaa. 
Off-atreat parking. 
Clo*e to cempus 
MR 

FOR SUMMER, ono room 
In three-bedroom 
apartment at $170 a 
month plui one-fourth 
utllltiaa. Call after 7pm. 
•at tor Amy 539-6491 

HOT DAMNI Wanting to 
live In luxury over tha 
aummar and not have 
to pay for it? Curiou* 
about Cfiate Manhat 
tan Apartmanta? We've 
got tha anawer for you 
Pool, sundeck, buk el 
ball, lounge, weight 
room, huge room*, 
laundry, private balco- 
ny for partial- exciied 
yot? Three- four-bad - 
roome. Call quick and 
•nap *er upM 539-1261. 

HOT DAYS, need new 
pool. We need •ummer 
aubtaaaarlal for 

three-bedroom at 
Woodway, furniture/ 
rant negotiable. Call 
532-212<Jor 532-3375. 

JUNE ANO July sublease. 
Nice, clean two-bed- 
room, one bath. Wash- 
er/ dryer. Cloaa to cam- 
pua. Call 776-3144. 

MALE/ FEMALE roommate 
needed for eummer 
with option for longer 
Free waaher/ dryer. 
Cloia to Aggieville 
Welk to campui. (200 
plua one-fourth utili- 
ties 776-4148 leave 
meaaaga tor Chris. 

MALE/ FEMAL?*ubleeser 
mid-May- Aug. Own 
bathroom, utllitiea 
paid, except one-helf 
KPL and phone. Mey 
rent free $150/ month 
537 3069, Stave. 

NICE TWO-BEDROOM. 
1326 N. Manhattan, 
Mey or June until July 
31. No pet*. S525 776- 



NON SMOKING FEMALE 
10 aubleaaa mid-May to 
Aug. Two-bedroom 
$210 plus one- half utili- 
ties two blocki from 
cempul 539-4266. 

ONE-BEDROOM APART 
MENT Available from 
May 1- Jury 31 Rent ia 
1300 One block from 
campua. Pleaie call 
587-0117 after 5p.m. 

ONE BEDROOM basement 
apartment available 
mid-May through mid 
Auguat. Rant S200. 
Waaher, dryer, air con- 
ditioner, partly fur- 
nished. Close to cam- 
pus scroll from Ford 
Hell. Cell evening* at 
778-0835. 

ONE-BEDROOM SUB 
LEASE June and July at 
Perk Place $330 a 
month. Two pools. Can 
renew lease. Call Mike 
at 539- 3556. 

ONE BEDROOM, June- 
Jury, $185/month nego- 
tiable Call 539-3683. 
m for Bob. 

ONE-BEDROOM. LOW 
rent, one-third utilities, 
with pool. From May 
10 Aug. 776-0665. J* 



ONE BLOCK from campus 
Furnished. Dishwasher 
waahar/ dryer. Own 
room Mey 12 to July 
31. No pete. 776-9659. 
Heather 

OWN ROOM In two-bad 
room apartment, two 
pool*, washer* and dry- 
era. $141.87, plua one- 
third utilities. 537-4030 
or S37-8067 sak for Jen 



SPACIOUS TWO-BED 
ROOM apertment. 
Large master bedroom 
Acrose from campus, 
near Aggievilla. $480 
per month. 537-6104. 

SUBLEASE ONE-BED 
ROOM of two-bed- 
room apartment in 
quiet building Avail- 
able now- Jury 31. All 
utilities paid, except 
electric, central air, cat* 
allowed. Call 539-8506. 

SUBLEASE SPACIOUS 
two-badroom apart 
ment, end of May 
through July. Fur- 
nlehed, three block* 
from campua. Rent ne- 
gotiable. If interested 
call 537-3585. 

SUBLEASE, FEMALE 

roommate wanted, 
own room, can be fur 
nlshed, $175/ month 
plua half utilities, eloaa 
to 'villa and campua. 
Non smoker wanted 
776 1301. leave mae- 



pool 
beetc 



SUBLEASE, THREE-BED- 
ROOM In Woodway for 
June and July. New 
. $450 e month or 
I oftar. 776-6663. 

SUBLEASE: SPACIOUS 
three-bedroom one 
end one-half balh. 
Great aummar location 
June end July Nego 
HeM*. Call 637-3981 



SUMMER SUBLEASE 
large, two-bedroom 
epertment; two blocks 
from cempus, on* and 
one-half blocks from 
Aggktvill*; rent negoti 
able; call 776-3483. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 
roommile needed, 
own room $300/ month 
plus utilities, weaher/ 
dryer, close to campus 
and Vet Mad. 537-1681 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 
Spadous two-badroom 
apertment. 

Non-smoker* only. 
539-4909 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- Slu 
dlo apertment right 
nail to campus. Fur 
nlehed, water and trash 
paid. Available Mey 15 
Aug. 1. $300. 538-8303. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- to 

share three-bedroom 
epertment. $200/ 

month and one-third 
militias Call Teleyne 
537-2538 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 

Two-bedroom house 
Just across street from 
Arby's on Bluemont. 
Available mid-May. Call 
778-8567 and leeve 
message. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE from 

mid-May- July 31. 
Close to cempus end 
Aggie vi Me, rent negoti 
abla. 587-0893. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE In 
Royal Towers to share 
furnlehed four-bed- 
room epertment Mey- 
Aug. Price negotiable 
Cell 539-6614 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, 
nice, negotiable, 

two-bedroom, two 
bath, very close to Ag- 
gievlile Mid-May- July 
31. Can 638-4133. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, 
ona-badroom. $2*0/ 
month ecros* from 
Aheern Natetorium 
778-6378. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, 
roommate to shir* two 
bedroom apartment 
close to cempus. 539- 
8489. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, spa 

clous, three-bedroom 
apartment. Two blocki 
from cempus. Available 
mid-May. Price negoti- 
able. Call 537-8074 and 
leeve meeeega. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, two- 
badroom partially fur- 
nished, dose to cempus 
end Aggieville. June/ 
July $315/ month, utili- 
ties end deposit. 539- 
9133. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE. Fe- 
male to share four-bed- 
room epertment in 
Royal Tower*. Own 
room cloaa to campus 
Available thru July 31, 
$175/ month. Call 
Heather 776-3550. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE: Fur 
nlshed one-bedroom, 
two blocks from cam- 
pus, available mid-May 
through Aug., weleY 
and trash paid, rant ne- 
gotiable call 587-0669 

SUMMER SUBLEASE: two 
bedroom furnished 
apartment $255 plu* 
Cell 539 8750 



SUMMER SUBLEASE: 
two-bedroom fur- 
nished apartment, two 
block* from Aggievilla. 
close to campus. Rant 
negotiable. Available 
mid-May through July 
31 776-5098 

SUMMER SUBLEASE: very 

nice three-bedroom 
apartment one block 
from campus end one 
block from Aggievilte. 
Available mid May 
through Auguat. Vary 
reasonable rent. 537 
3572. 

THREE-BEDROOM APART 
MENT for *umm«r. 
Clot* to campui, wash- 
er and dryar, lot* of 
room, price negotiable 
call 539-3854. 

THREE-BEDROOM SUB- 
LEASE $175 per room. 
June 1 to Aug. 1. Cell 
532-2891 

TOWNHOUSE SUMMER 
sublease option (o rent 
Five-bedroom*. 2.5 
bathrooms, wesh«r/ 
dryer. Available on or 
after May 1. $165/ 
month/ person 

$37-3027 

TWO-BEDROOM HOUSE 
Available mid-May to 
July 31. Option for 
1994- 95 ichool yeer. 
No pet*. 539-3497 

TWO BEDROOM, FUR- 
NISHED, one block 
from campua Air con- 
ditioner, di*hwa*h*r. 
All utilities paid. Rant 
negotiable. Call/leave 
mesaaga, 776-3036. 

200 



SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



Ratum*/ 

T yp"*t 

DATA SHEETS, term pa 

t*r», dissertations. 
asar printer Fast, ac 
curete service 12 years 
experience. Mr*. Bur- 
dan, 539-1304 

RESUME RESUME RE- 
SUME end all your 
other word processing 
need*. Later printing 
Call Brands, 776-3290 

WORD PROCESSING don* 
In my home. Pepen. 
reiumes, letter*, re- 
ports, the***, etc Con- 
tact Cerol anytime et 
776-4396. 

WORDPROCESSING SUP- 
PORT for your scad* 
mic end professional 
naede. Pepers, 

reiumei, letter*, re- 



ports. Contacl Peggie 

(evening* | st 539- 1191 



Prsgnewicy 



PREGNANT? 



Free Tests 
Free Counseling 



M Options MscussesJ 




Pregnane) 
Irsiing Center 

539-3338 



•I IIV I'tV'.'M.llKX 



•S,ii:iiLl\ ILNllIb 
< '.ill !H',lj*Y WW lk.111 



wimtni- in 
VikkTMin Villa* 



Mon.-Fri. 

9 ii.m.o p. in. 



Automotive 
Repair 



NISSAN- OATSUN Repair 
Service. 22 year* ex- 
perience . Mazda*, Hon- 
da* and Toyota* also. 
Auto Craft, 2612 Dipper 
Lane, Manhattan, Kan- 
*at. 537-5049. 5a.m.- 
5p.m. Mon.- Fri. 



Ottior 

Sonrlco* 



INTERNATIONAL STUD 
ENTS: DV-1 Greencerd 
Program. Sponsored 
by U.S. Immigration. 
Greencerds provide 
U.S. permanent resi- 
dent status. Citizen* o* 
almost ell countries are 
allowed. For informa- 
tion and form*: New 
Ere Legal Services, 
20231 Stagg St., Cino- 
ge Perk. CA 91308 Tel: 
(8181772-7168; t 

1818)998-4435. Mon- 
Sun. to* m - 11p.m. 

PROMPT CONTRACEPTIVE 
end abortion services. 
Dele L. Clinton, M.O., 
Lawrence, 
1913)841-5716. 



Insurance 



HEALTH AND Auto cov 

erage. Call us before 
purchasing The Uni- 
versity Health Plan. Tim 
L. Engl* Agency 3528 
Kimball Ave. (Candle 
wood Shopping Cen- 
ter) 537-4661 KSU 
gred 1988 



30© 



EMPLOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 



Help Watited 

The Collegian cannot 
verify the financial po- 
tential of advert)** 
manta In tha Employ 



ment/Career elaself lec- 
tion. Reader* ere) ad 
vlied to approech any 
such employment op- 
portunity with reason 
•hie caution Tha Col 
leglan urges our read- 
era to contact tha Bat- 
ter Business Bureau. 
BOI SB Jefferson, To- 
pake, KS SBS07-11SO. 
(8131232-0464 

1SSS CALENDAR Con- 
teat. Send photo* to 
P.O. Box 491. Manhat 
tan, XS 66502 or call 
776-5649. 

AEROBICS- EARN money, 
while you exercise. In- 
structor training 
course April 23 and 
30.1964.1816)561-6933 

ALASKA SUMMER EM- 
PLOYMENT- fisher 
lea. Meny eern $2000 

filua/ month In cenner- 
•■ or S3000- $6000 
plua/ month on fishing 
vasaele. For informa- 
tion call: 1206)545-4155 
oxi A5788. 

AN EXCELLENT career op- 
portunity exists in 
northeast Kansas tor a 
herdsmen in our breed 
Ing facility. Our 1500 
low farrow to flntih 
unit Is totally confined 
end utilize* the latest 
technology. We era 
looking for serf-motivat- 
ed, responsible teem 
player* who an joy end 
respect animals and are 
looking for job security 
if you have an animal 
science degree or farm 
background you may 
be Just the person wa 
are looking for. Experi- 
ence with Artificial In- 
semination would also 
be helpful. Salary with 
lick leeve, peid vaca- 
tion and Insurance. 
Send resume to: Agri- 
Butlnes*. Rt. 7, Box 97, 
Washington, Kanaas 

APARTMENT MAIN- 

TENANCE carpentry 
and painting experi- 
ence require full-time 
In aummer part-time 
during school. 

537-8800 

ARGANBRIGHT HAR- 
VESTING. Wanted, 
clean cut parson tor 94 
harvest run. Best equip- 
ment and pay m id- May 
through mld-Aug. 
Thed. 1-363-2737 

ATTENTION GREEKS: 126- 
year- old firm has 20 
spots available for sum- 
mer work. Make excel- 
lent career contact* for 
future job seerchee. 
over f 1,500 per month, 
reel world experience. 
For information call I- 
800 6402840. 

ATTENTION: STUDENTS, 
Full-time aummer em 
ployment. 40- 50 hours 
per week. Must be 18 
years and have two 
I.D.'s (driver's, S.S. or 
Stela I.D.I. Drivers, 
packers, and helpers 
needed. Apply in per- 
son, Coleman Amef I 
can Moving Services 
-415 S. Kth in Manhat 
Mn 

CAMP COUNSELORS 

wanted for private 
Michigan boy*/ girl* 
aummer camps. Teach: 
Swimming, canoeing, 
•ailing, waterskiing, 
gymnastics, riflery, 
archery, lennie, golf, 
sport*. computer*, 
camping, crafts, 

dramatics, or riding 
Alio kitchen, office, 
maintenance Salary 
S1 150 or more plus 
R&B Camp LWC/GWC, 
1765 Maple. North fie Id, 
IL 60093 (7081446-2444. 

COMPUTER NETWORK 
Administrator Assis- 
tant part-time »tud- 
ent position, mostly 
regularly scheduled 
hour* with limited 
emergency trou- 

bleshooting hours. As* 
1st* in overseeing 
G5-compuler Macin 
toah network, including 
troubleshooting, harif 
ware meintenance, soft 
ware backupe. end 
records meintenence. 
Should be familiar with 
Macintosh operating 
systems 6 and 7 end 
trnvc good generel 
knowledge of Mecin 
tosh software. Network 
experience with local- 
talk and ethernel pre- 
ferred. Beaic herriwire 
and software trou- 
bleshooting skills need 
ad. Minimum wage. Po 



anion to ttart early Au- 
gust. Pick up applies 
tion at 1 13 Kedile. Ap 
plicetion deadline is 
3p m on Frl., April 
IB. 19*4 

CRUISE LINE entry level on 
board and landtide po- 
ysiiions available Sum- 
mer or year round. 
great benefits, free trev 
el. 1813)229-5478 (Flori- 
da). 

CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIR- 
ING- Earn up to $2,000 
plua/ month working on 
Cruis* Ship* or Land- 
Tour companies. World 
travel. Summer and 
Full-time employment 
available. No experi- 
ence neceisary. For 
more information call 1 - 
206434-0466 *xt. C5768 

DELIVERY DRIVERS warn 
•d for the KC Metro 
Area. Put your vehicle 
to work for you. Full- 
time day*, graat sum 
mer job. Cell Quick De 
livery (913)888-8627. 

EARN OVER 5100/ hour 
processing our mail el 
Roma. For information 
_ Call (202)310-5958. 

HARVEST HELP wanted. 
Need combine and 
truck drivers for sum- 
mer wheat hervest. 
Board, room, and good 
pay. Home before 
school itarts 

1913)877-2094. 

HELP WANTEO- INSPEC 
TOR of utility poles 
Will train. Require* a 
tot of walking along util- 
ity line* in rural Hutchi- 
son area Approximate 
ty three month* work. 
Start in May. $7/ hour 
altar training. Phone 
(303)482-6550 for addi 
lional information and 
application. . 

HELP WANTED for custom 
harvest- combine op- 
erator* and truck driv- 
ers. Experience pre- 
ferred. Call 
(303)483-7490 evenings. 

INTERNATIONAL EM- 
PLOYMENT- Make up 
to 52000- $40000 plua/ 
month teaching basic 
conversational English 
In Japen, Taiwen, or S. 
Koree. No leeching 
beckground or Asian 
language* required For 
information call: 

(206)632-1148 
*xtJ5768. 

LABORERS NEEDED for 
construction work. 
Start immediately Call 
19131841-6347. 

LABORERS NEEDED. Land- 
scape and retaining 
well experience re- 

3ulr*d. Start imme- 
lately, cell 

[913)841-8347 

NANNIES WANTED- Po*i 
tion* nationwide, sum- 
mer or yeer round, ex- 
perience not required. 
Great pay and benefit*, 
free trevel. 

(612*543^4399 

NANNY/ CHILDCARE giv 
er. Mature, responsible, 
loving person. Wantad 
(o care for one and 
three year old girla at 
our home Monday- Fri- 
day, 7:30a. m - 5:30pm 
beginning Mey 16, 1994 
or August 1994. Perl- 
time al*o a possibility 
Permanent position, 
good pey. Call 776-8336 

NEWSPAPER ADVER- 
TISING SALES Mont 

K ornery Publications 
si en opening for an 
advertising sale* repre- 
sentative to service ac- 
count* in our multi-pub- 
lication area. Must be 
responsible, well- or- 
ganiiad eelf- alerter 
who cen produce re- 
sults with mini met tu 
pervielon Previous 
media *ale* experience 
preferred. Base salary 
plus commission and 
mileage allowance. 
Send resume IN CON- 
FIDENCE lo Daily 
Union, P.O. Box 129, 
Junction City, Kansas 
66441 or fill out ipplice 
lion st 222 Will 6th 
Street 

NON-SMOKING DAYCARE 
provider wanted for 
two kids age* 2 end 5 

Part-time or full-time 
776-0681 

PART-TIME ORAFTSMAN 
needed tor residential 
construction 539-6840. 



PART-TIME MAIN- 

TE NANCE person need- 
ed May IS for 60 apart 

menu, basic plumbing. 
electrical, and carpen- 
try skills needed. Re- 
spond to P.O. Box 1286 

Manhattan 

RILEY COUNTY has an ss- 
needad part-time (12- 
18 hours/ week I posi- 
tion to work with PC us- 
ers, could be full-lime 
summer. Require* PC 
knowledge with DOS, 
Windows, help desk 
■nd database develop- 
ment experience. De- 
sire experience with tha 
following a pp 1 1 cation s: 
Word, Excel, Lotus, 
Quattro Pro. and Word- 
Perfect. Pay is 56.17/ 
hour. Apply at Person 
net and Information 
Systems. 110 Court 
house Plaza, third floor. 
through April 18, 1994 
EEOE. 

STUDENT CONSULTANT: 
Experience with both 
Mainframe and Micro 
computer*, elong with 
GPA will be selection 
criteria. Undergradu- 
ates with employment 
potential of two yeer* 
givan preference. Con 
tact Joyce in Room 16 
Nichols Hall, by 5p.m., 
Mon April IB, 1994, No 
phone carts 

STUDENT OFFICE monag 
er needed at K State lo 
cation. Approximately 

15 flexible houra per 
week and approximate- 
ly S500V month Job be- 
gins now, breaks for 
summer, end resumes 
when school Herts. 
Busines* background 
NOT required. Greet 
job lor busy student 
For more information 
see 'Jon's Note*" card 
on the Job Board in the 
Union. Apply as soon 
as possible. 

SUMMER EMPLOY- 

MENT. Experienced 
Combine or Truest 
Drivers needed for 
custom wheat her 
veeting operation. 
Motel and Meale In- 
cluded. Wages based 
on experience Work 
from May 20 thru Au- 
gust 15, 1994 From 
Texas to Montana. 
Lancaster Harvesting, 
Dodge City, Kansas 
Call Now (3161227-8821. 

SUMMER WORK available 
at KSU Vegetable Re 
search farm, DeSoto 
(Kansas City area) 56/ 
hour/ 40 hours par 
week. Muil have own 
treniportetlon to Ihe 
farm Contact Or Che 
rles Marr, Horticulture. 
Water* Hall 533-6170 
or Christy Nagel (samel 
for more information. 

SUMMER WORK $470 per 
week eve rage Good 
(rack record needed 
Call 1 600-840-2840. 

THE CITY of Manhattan. 
Kansas has two posi- 
tions available for Crew 
Leaders to supervise 
youth work crews in e 
variety ol parks related 
ectivrtie* Salary $550- 

16 Cell Terry DeWeeee 
at 587-3757. 

THE CITY of Westmore- 
land is accepting appli- 
cations to fill the pon 
tion of pool manager 
WSI certification re- 
quired for further in- 
formation call 
1-467-3361 or request 
an application from 
City Hall 202 Main St. 
Westmoreland 



T 

TRAVEL FROM Tax a* to 

Montana on a prole*- 

- sionel wheat harvesting 

crew. Guaranteed 

monthly wage, bonus, 
room snd board. Call 
(9131567- 



VARNEY'S BOOK Stora Is 
now taking applications 
for TEMPORARY 

PART-TIME and TEM- 
PORARY FULL-TIME 
position i in the text-. 
book depertment to 
assist with textbook 
buyback Possible em- 
ployment dele* are 
April 26 through May 
13. $4 30 per hour. In- 
volve* helping custom- 
er*, moderate lifting 
and cleaning/ pricing 
books. All positions re- 
quire diligence end * 
pleasant, service orient 
ed ettitude. College ex 
perience is strongly pre 
ferred. Apply in person 
downstairs at Var nay's 
Book Store. 623 N. 
Manhattan Ave., Man 
hattan, KS. Deadline for 
applications is Fri.. 
April IS. 

VISTA DRIVE-IN i* now hir- 
ing for full or part-time 
help- Flexible hours 
available. Apply in per 
■on 1911 Tuttle Creek 
Blvd. or 2700 Anderson 
Ave. 

WANTED HARVEST 
HELP. Run three 1994 
Ceee international com- 
bine*. Three 1991 
Chevy Kodiak automat- 
ic twin screw trucks. 
Pay is $1000- $1200 a 
month room and board 
i* provided. Need COL 
drivers license. We wilt 
help obtain CDL over 
Spring Breek. Prefer 
non-smokers, 
non-drinker* and no 
drug users. Gaines Har- 
vesting (913)689 4660 

WEATHER OBSERVER 
needed for the Weather 
Deta. Library. Must be 
available 7- 8em snd 7- 
8pm yeer- round includ- 
ing some weekends 
and holidays. 15- 30 
hour*/ week. Preference 
given to undergradu- 
ates with two years 
availability, Appllca 
tion* in 211 Umberger 
Hall. 

WORK-STUDY STUDENT 
for F94 semester, 15- 

30 hours/ week. Regis- 
trar'* Office. Conlrect 
Evelyn Lanon et 
533-6354 lor inform* 
lion. 



OpportunltJ— 

The Collegian cannot 
verify tha financial po- 
tential of advertise- 
ments In tha Employ- 
ment/Career classifies 
tion. Reader* ere *d- 
vl**d to approach any 
■ uch bueinae* oppor- 
tunity with reasonable 
caution. The Collegian 
urges our reader* to 
contact the Better BueJ- 
neee Bureau, BOI SE 
Jefferson, Topekta, KS 
66607-1 1*0. 
19131232-0454 

ATTENTION STUDENTS: 
Earn exlr* cash stuffing 
envelope* et home. All 
materials provided 
Send SASE to Midwest 
Mailers PO. Box 395. 
Oletha, KS 66051. Im 
mediate Response 



WintsXl to eaeiy 



AUOHI VIDEO GAMES 

Buy- sell- trade. Ninten 
do- Sega- all ivstems 
Game Guy 537-0989 
709 N. Twelfth, Ag- 
gieville. 



409 



OPEN 
MARKET 



Item*, for 



CAP AND gown Phd 
length 56: 18-foot 
Grumman aluminum 
canoe, old time pid- 
dles; two Sentoucl lit* 
jackala. vests and pil 
lows, 539-4113 

DO YOU want to get rid of 
celluiite? Rolls of fat? 
Those dreaded arees 
that never go away no. 
matter how much you 
diet or exercise? Sci- 
ence now tells us there 
is something we can do 
about those problem ar 
eas, end I hive the pro- 
duct that will do just 
that- and it comes with 
* 100 percent Guaran- 
tee! Call Cheryl 
776-5393 day. 776-7669 
evening, 

FOR SALE blender $10. mi- 
crowave $40, entertain 
ment center $60. end ta- 
ble* $5. grill $10. dr**« 
er SI 5, stereo cabinet 
$10, 539-2228 



■'♦♦«04)»00*>04>»00- 

: j Thigh Cream ! I 

!! *25 It 

; I Manhattan Weight j I 

< > Loss Clinic < » 
;: 2!7 Southwlnd ',', 

< > 539-7 700 ( • 



PIONEER CAR cassette re 

ceiver . JS 2 14 car equal - 
iier/ amplifier and 
Pioneer stereo •peak- 
era. 537-9344. 

SAMYANG ZOOM lens 
with Macro. 60 300mm 
Used twice, works 
great. Need money. 
$100 or best offer, Lau- 
rie 587-0598. 

418 

Furniture to 

mnmtut 

COUCH. TWO chairs, cof- 
fee table, matching *et, 
weetern style, $100 539 
2856, leeve message 

MUST SELL couch, chair, 
limp end super single 
weterbed 539 0550 

MUST SELL fasti Moving 
on April 16, 1994 
Chair, $20; rocking 
chair, $10; kitchen table 
with chairs, $20; queen 
waterbed, $175, book- 
case, $50, 537-4373 

SIMMONS QUEEN alia 

mattress $60, queen 
lire mattress and box 



ADVERTISING PRODUCTION 



Publication Practice 
JMC 360 

Get training and gain experience while earning one hour of 
credit this fall. Attend class one day a week from 8:30 a,m.- 
1 1 :30 a.m. The day of the week is your choice based on 
availability. Only Iwq positions left so sign up early. The 
instructor's permission is required. 

The experience you earn in the fait would qualify you to apply 
for a paid position in the spring. 

° 8 a.m.-3 p.m. «* 
for more information and syllabus ■ 



Classified Directory 



ofJo 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 



01ft AmcxitxarTierit. 
mo Lost and Found 
040 Personals 
040 Meetmgs/Evonts 
060 Partjes-n-More 




HOUSING 
REAL ESTATE 



100 ForRant- 

Apl Furrirshed 

110 FOfflesn- 

Apt. Urtumjihed 



111 Rooms AvailaWe 
ISO For Bent - htouats 
1SB For Sale -Hoot** 

IM For Rem - 

Mobile Homes 

198 ForSale- 



140 For Rent - Garage 

148 Roommate Wanted 

180 Sublease 

188 StaMPattui 

180 Office Space 

188 LandlorSale 




SERVICE 
OlAECfQRY 



888 Tutor 



810 Resume/Typing 

818 Desktop Pi*W»ng 

S30 Sewnp/AMerations 

838 Pregnancy Teshrtg 

880 Lawn Care 

888 Child Care 

840 Musicians/DJs 

848 Pel Services 

880 Automotive Repair 

888 Ofliei Services 




EMPLOYMENT, 
CAREERS 



110 Heip Wanted 
880 voiuniaers Needed 

880 Susmeas 

Cpportuntbaa 



4u% 



OPEN 

MARKET 



408 WantedtoBuY 

410 Items lorSale 

418 Furniture to Buy/Se" 

420 Garage/Yard Sales 

488 Aucton 

480 Antiques 

'488 Computers 

440 Food Specials 

448 Muse iMtrutnarita 

480 Pets anrj Supplies 

488 Sporting Equipment 

480 Steteo Equipment 

488 TM(6titoBuyS«l 



5lk 



TRANS- 
PORTATION 



810 AulornoMas 

880 Bicycles 
88ft Motorcycles 
.840 Car Pool 




810 Tour Packages 
880 AJrpltraTfckfjtt 
880 Train Tickets 
840 Bue Tickets 



CATEGORIES 

To help you find what you are 
looking for. the classified ads 
have been arranged by category 
and sub-category. All categories 
are marked by one ol the large 
Images, and sub-categories are 
preceded by a number 
designation. 

TIPS FOR 
WRITING A 
CLASSIFIED AD 

Always pul what item or 
service you are advertising first. 
This helps potential buyers find 
whal they are looking lor 

Don't use abbreviations Many 
buyers are confused by 
abbreviations. 

Consider including the price. 
This telle buyers if they are 
looking at something in their price 
range. 

WE DO NOT USE PHONE 
NUMBERS OR LAST NAMES IN 
PERSONALS. 



spring*- sat tor $50, 
sofa- $60 or best offer, 
coffee teblee- SIS * 
pi*c*. 776-7863. leave 
message 



Ster«o 

Hqtflpnrsfrt 

10 inch SUB woofers, 
RCA VCR four-head 
with VCRPLUS. Call 537 
1724 after 5pm 



Tickets to 



BROOKS AND Dunn Tick- 
ets for sale. Two in sec- 
tion nine, row 16 end 
one In aactlon eight 
row three. Cell Toby 
Rueh 532 52)2 

BROOKS ANO Dunn tick- 
ets for sale, 537-7096. 

TWO BROOKS and Dunn 
ticket*. Section eight, 
chair backs, better than 
average seats. Call 539 
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TRANS- 
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Automobiles 



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tire*. 1959 Chevy 
school bus, excellent 
shape, run* good. 1955 
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Chevy short wide bed, 
fleetside with Nova sub 
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after 5:30 p.m. or leave 
menage. 

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battery, alternator, air, 
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1986 CAMERO, V 8. needs 
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a message. 

1986 NOVA, white, an. 
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1986 RENAULT Alliance. 
Red four-door. 108K 
miles. Very cleen, run*, 
could use engine work. 
$600 or beat offer. Lau- 
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1989 T-B1RD Turbo Coupe. 
Excellent condition, au- 
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seats, windows, 

five-speed, ground ef- 
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mile*. Must sell. $4000, 
cell Russ 776-3231. 

FOR SALE: 1992 Meide 

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9,100 miles, power 
windows, locks, meg 
wheels, excellent condi- 
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leave message. 



Motor c ycleta) 

1962 SUZUKI GS750T, 
run* excellent, new 

rear tire, very good con- 
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under 3000 miles, very 
good condition, like 
new. Must see at 1838 
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1988 HONDA Hawk GT: Ex- 
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6.000 miles, bought 
new in 1991.537-3295. 

1990 HONDA C8R 600F. 
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0LLEGIAN 

Ktdzi* 101 532-eSSS 



4 A Thursday, April 14, 1904 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Vague rules hamper process 



"I personally 
think the 
■lections 
Committee 
should be a 



That way, 
when there 
are problems, 
there's time 
to do 

something 
about It." 

Shanta Bailey 

Elections Committee 
Chairperson 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

them as well as we could." 

Bailey agreed the elec- 
tions process needed more 
time. 

"I personally think the 
Elections Committee should 
be a year long," she said. 
"That way, when there are 
problems, there's time to do 
something about it." 

a lltctlon Commit!** 
could be appointed In 



Jahnke said the way the 
rules were written, the 
Election Committee could 
technically be appointed in 
September or October. 

"Next year, the thing I 
will suggest looking into is 
having the chair selected 
during the fall," Jahnke said. 
"I would be pretty sure that 
you'll see something like 
that next year." 

Regarding the charges 
that the Election Committee 
violated the Kansas Open 
Meetings Act and failed to 
give students due process, 
Bailey said it was purely 
accidental. 

a Mooting was not 
closed Intsnlonally, com- 
mlttoo mombor says 

The Elections Grievance 
Committee disqualified 
three members of the Wild 
Turkee Workers' Party 
Thursday, April 7. because 
they had violated campaign 
guidelines by campaigning 
as a party even though they 
were not registered as a 
party. 



However, the committee 
failed to contact the candi- 
dates before disqualifying 
them, thus denying them a 
hearing. 

They also did not notify 
the Collegian of the meeting, 
which is a violation of the 
Kansas Open Meetings Act. 

The act states anyone 
requesting the time, date and 
place of a public meeting 
must be provided that infor- 
mation. 

Kara Rogers, a member 
of both the Election and 
Grievance committees, said 
a Collegian reporter was at 
the meeting earlier in the 
evening while the committee 
was trying to get things done 
for the election. 

A complaint had been 
filed against Wild Turkee 
Workers* Party members, 
Rogers said, but they did not 
have enough members of the 
grievance committee present 
to take any action. 

At about 1 1 :30 p.m., after 
the committee had decided 
to adjourn and the reporter 
had left, another member 
was found at the last minute. 

"We made a decision," 
Rogers said. "We voted to 
remove them from the bal- 
lot." 

The Collegian reporter 
was not notified that the 
meeting had resumed. 

"We were focussed more 
on the grievance than on the 
Collegian," Rogers said. 
"We didn't mean to deny 
access to anyone." 

Bailey said the candidates 
weren't notified. 

"Only because the meet- 



ing was so late," she said. 
"We didn't follow procedure 
on that, and we owned up to 
it. It wasn't a malicious 
attack on them personally. 
We saw a violation of the 
-rules and tried to get things 
done." 

The candidates were put 
back on the ballot because 
they were denied due 
process. 

Problems also arose when 
some candidates were taken 
off the ballots because they 
failed to rum in expenditure 
reports. 

There were complaints 
that some candidates had 
turned in expenditure reports 
late and remained on the bal- 
lot, while others were taken 
off. 

a Probtems caused by 
vague regulation proco- 



Beall said the problems 
were caused by the vague- 
ness of the regulation proce- 
dure for turning in expendi- 
ture reports late. 

The regulations state that 
not turning in an expenditure 
report will result in the 
removal of the candidate's 
name from the ballot. 

"It doesn't say anything 
about being late," Beall said. 
"If it had just said something 
about being late, we 
wouldn't have had this prob- 
lem." 

Bailey said she didn't 
know it was the committee's 
job to call candidates and 
tell them they didn't turn in 
their expenditure reports. 

She said she contacted 



everyone who was dismissed 
from the ballot. 

Some of those candidates 
came to the Sunday night 
meeting to appeal their dis- 
missal, and some didn't call 
back at all, Bailey said. 

"The illusion was that we 
were trying to be secretive," 
she said. "It wasn't that we 
were trying to deny anyone 
due process. If we were con- 
tact] ng people and waiting 
for them to call back, the 
committee would be on duty 
24 hours a day." 

Bailey said the committee 
did not meet until Sunday to 
review the reports because 
that was the only time they 
could get a quorum. 

Bailey said all candidates 
recieved an information 
packet with the rules and 
regulations when they regis- 
tered for the election. 

a Skoog didn't foresee 
overturned election or 



Ed Skoog, student body 
president, said he didn't 
foresee an overturning of the 
election or an impeachment 
of the Election Committee. 

"I cannot imagine any 
scenario in which the 
integrity of the Election 
Committee goes to a Senate 
vote," he said. 

Skoog said this year's 
election was less flawed 
than last year's. 

"Speaking as an expert, 
this election went much 
more smoothly than last 
year's election," he said. 
"And the result will be a 
very fair election." 



■> 



Delay prompts 
mixed feelings 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

"We can't control that," he said. 
"We'll deal with it tomorrow." 

Student body presidential candi- 
date' Michelle Smith and her run- 
ning mate, Patrick Robben, said 
they did not blame the Election 
Committee, 

"I'm just kind of disappointed 
that we won't know tonight." Smith 
said. "I know it's not their fault, but 
it's too bad there is no closure." 

Presidential candidate Jeff 
Peterson said he didn't understand 
why students this year did not get 
the ballots counted. 

"It's always been a student staff, 
to I don't understand," Peterson 
said. 

A candidate for Student Senate 
characterized this election as 
"incompetency run rampant at K- 
State." 

James McCracken, candidate for 
Student Senate in the College of 
Business Administration, said he 
received a call from the Senate 
Election Committee at around 9 
p.m. He said he was told the results 
would only take another hour. 

McCracken also said he was one 
of the students told Tuesday that he 
had to revote on Wednesday 
because of the mistake on the 



Union Governing Board ballot ; 

'This is just a joke. In my opin* 
ion, they should just refund the 
expenditures for trie campaign and 
do the election all over again." 

McCracken said he is worried 
about how the accuracy of the tally 
is going to be perceived by the stu 
dent body. 

"I'm just afraid that students are 
going to say to themselves, 'Are 
these the people who got the most 
votes?'" 

He said he thought the Electiod 
Committee's adjournment until this 
morning showed a lack of commit- 
ment, However, he said he'd rather, 
they did that than make a mistake. j 

McCracken said he felt the com- 
mittee had failed K-State .students 
who had gone to the trouble to pari 
ticipate in this election. 

"I appreciate people who did 
vote and put up with the hassles," 
he said. "The level of involvement 
that we're getting from students is 
excellent, but I just hope this 
doesn't happen again." 

The following staff members 
contributed to this story: 

Crist ina Janney. JR P rather, 
Renee Martin, Tawnya Ernst, Philt 
Spiker, Andrew Tomb and Aaron 
Graham, 




Look in Friday's Collegian 
for the results of the general 

election and 

continued coverage of the 

1994 student election. 



Collegian 
coverage 
criticized by 
committee 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

"One of the things that was mis- 
understood was the editorial making 
fun of how the Elections Committee 
doesn't know two-thirds of five," 
Beall said. "It seemed like it was a 
personal vendetta, 

"The Collegian made it sound 
like we stayed there for hours figur- 
ing out two-thirds of five. It was 
only brought up for a minute." 

Beall also said the Collegian 
shouldn't be so quick to criticize 
other people's mistakes. 

"As far as UGB clerical mistakes, 
we made mistakes with the ballots. 
How can (the Collegian) criticize us 
for making clerical mistakes when 
(it) made errors in the Voter's 
Guide?" Beall said. 

"If we hadn't had expenditure 
problems and clerical problems in 
the ballot, then, from what I've 
heard, a grievance might have been 
brought up about candidates' mis- 
representation in the Voter's Guide, 
arid we would have had to call a new 
election," he said. 

Beall said many student senators 
were supportive and sympathetic to 
what the committee was going 
through. 

Ed Skoog, student body presi- 
dent, said Election Committee mem- 
bers were the unsung heroes of 
Student Senate. 

"Election chairs do it because 
they were conned into it or did it out 
of the goodness of their hearts," 
Skoog said. "In the process, they get 
dragged through the mud." 

Bailey said the committee never 
intended to keep people in the dark. 

"We're not sneaky. We're not 
secretive. We're not an ti -Collegian. 
We're not against the judicial 
process," Bailey said. 

"We didn't throw darts at a dart- 
board. We felt like we were follow- 
ing the rules." 



Have a 
hot news tip? 

us a 
call. 

532-6556 



Flowers are 

more fun 

than taxes. 




G THOMAS JEWELERS 

"FOR. THE GIFT OF 

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MANHATTAN SHOE REPAIR 

3 doors up the alley from Downtown Burger King 

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315 Poyntz 




DUERFELDTS 
DIAMOND CONNECTION 

We buy direct so our prices are 

LOWER EVERY DAYIlt 

For All Your Jewelry Needs 

LOOK FOR THE BRIGHT GREEN AWNING 

M.T.WF- 9 30 I m -«:00 p m. COQ OOOR 
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Hair Styling, Tanning, Nth, and Supplies 



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532-9009 





fffSnift CLOTHIERS 

English & Western Tack and Supplies 

9-5:30 Mo n. -Sat • Until 8 p.m. Tnurs 
Sunday: 1-5 p.m. 

537-8810 317-B Poyntz Ave. 



And over the years some 

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town-especially Downtown! 

With over 300 businesses, 
shops and restaurants, we're 
the largest and most diverse 

shopping district in town. 

Discover Downtown. 



V. — ?DOWMTOWM 

China Silver Collectibles Crystals 

Wedding invitations St announcements 
10% to 20% off now through May IS 

9th ST Poyntz Bridal Registry 776-9067 



SHOE 




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SHOE FIT COMPANY 1 Door Wet of Burger King 




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Two Locations 
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776-5900 539-6227 



CRumi 

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(81 J) 778-4784 1-800-887 78M 
FSX (818) 778-448* 







Exp. Date 00/00 
Kansas State Historical Society 
Newspaper Section 
120 1 10th 
Topeka KS 66612 



■■ m'niyr- 




("* KANSAS STATE 
^OLLEGIAN 





APRIL 15, 1994 



KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66506 



VOLUME 99A, NUMBER 137 



jej* is/ : 




Jeff Peterson, candi- 
date for student body 
president, shakes 
hands with Taylor 
Miller In the K-State 
Union after the results 
were posted. 

CAftY COMOVWt 

CoHagian 



Dale Sylvius, 

candidate for 
student body vice 
president, looks at 
the election results 
after they are post- 
ed Thursday after- 
noon In the SQA 
office. 

oaky cottovm 

Cotogian 





«r 


^' ^•e] 


a>, H , 


Bh r9J 


V 


^sW |P ^^*^^*^^^ 

It At 




SQMUU 



PRESIDENT/VICE PRESIDENT 


Jeff Pfrtersoo/Brtd Rnkekfel 


1,462 


Stacy DaKon/DileSllvius 


719 


Steffany Carrei/Nabeeha Kaa 
Ben Eastep/Taytor Miller 


386 
244 


Michelle Smith/Patrick Robber 


127 


Bold designates the candidates who will 
compete In next week's run-oft 



Here are the winners of the Student 
Government elections and the 
number of votes they received. 

AGRICULTURE ARCHITECTURE 



Brent Wiede man 
Trent LsDoux 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



211 
208 



WARD Of STUDENT 

PUBLICATIONS WINNERS 


Aaron Otto 


1,470 


Tamara Jordon 


1,105 


Jermine Alberty 


887 


Richard Cherra 


889 


Tonya Foster 


35 



Two referendums were decided by the 
student elections. The referendums 
dealt with Union enhancement and 
student ID cards. 

■ UNION EXPANSION 

The Union referedum needed 
60 percent of the vote to pass. 
It received 59 percent. 

1 ,823 59% " 
1,268 41% 



YES 
NO 



STUDENT IDs 

Mew K-State student IDs were 
voted on, the choices being a 
Willie the Wildcat (A) or a Power 
Cat (B). The Power Cat won. 



A 

B 



1,027 
2,011 



m. 



Liz Ring 


386 


Aaron Otto 


385 


David Frese 


332 


Brent Coverdale 


293 


Scott Rotting ha us 


292 


Rachel Smith 


285 


Brandon Clark 


243 


Michael Henry 


245 


Pat Carney 


237 


Mai* Tomb 


231 


DanLewerenz 


228 


Sarah Louise Engler 


219 


Jared Becker 


214 


Becca K or phage 


213 


Kori Keeton 


211 


Jennifer Higerd 


210 


Laura Bathurst 


209 


EDUCATION 




Chris Glenn 


143 


MattSlodner 


136 


Jermine Aberty 


128 


Doug LaMun yon 


120 


Jereme Brueggeman 


5 


Sharon Moreland 


4 


FINE ARTS 




COUNCIL 




Greg Roth 


694 


Heather Schoenberger 666 


Dennis Brooks 


543 


HUMAN ECOLOGY 


David Winkler 


87 


Michelle Bennett 


84 


Brad House II 


71 



Christopher Jones 75 

FayePremer 59 



BUSINESS 

Michele Meier 159 

Casey Carlson 134 

Clayton Wheeler 115 

Derek Krertels 112 

Chuck Haynes Jr. 100 

John Reidel 104 

Steve Weatherman 83 



ENGINEERING 

Todd Lakin 221 

Philip Mudd 169 

Brian Lee 167 

Brian Bowen 151 

Jason Mitchell 143 

Amber Sumpter 142 

Chris Flanigan 136 

Paul Hrencher 134 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Chuntao Yan 
Shuoham Maheshwari 
Karen 1 1 aster 

Gerry Manke 
JeflNewtson 
JoePareell 



63 
12 

e 

5 
5 
5 



Rodney York 



28 



Source: SludeiH Governing A»*oci«tK>n 



SARA S»»rrHrtoHeaieri 



Proposal requires 
bike registration 



A proposed 
bicycle fee 
was dis- 
cussed 
Wednesday at an 
open meeting. 

The Council on Traffic. 
Parking and Police Operations 
had its annual hearing to dis- 
cuss the proposed changes for 
the 1994-95 school year at 3 
p.m. in the Union Big 8 Room. 

According to the bicycle 
proposal, all people parking 
bicycles on campus must regis- 
ter them with the K-State 
Parking Services and pay a S3 
fee. They alio must display a 
registration sticker on their 
bicycles. 

Ed Skoog, student body 
president, said the proposal 
should be changed so there 
would be free bicycle registra- 
tion next year. 

"There Is a great deal of stu- 
dent concern," he said. "A lot 
students are upset about the $5 
fee. 

"Bicycle registration is 
absolutely essential considering 
the Increase of bicycle acci- 
dents on campus," Skoog said. 

There are two significant 
reasons some people think the 
proposal should be revised. 

"It discourages bicycle rid- 
ing on campus when we should 
be encouraging bicycle riding 
on campus," Skoog said. "The 
fee would not generate any- 
where near the revenue 
required to enact the bicycle 
codes." 

Philip Cook, research assis- 



tant for the forestry and recre- 
ation resources division, has 
ridden his bicycle or walked to 
and from work for more than 
six years. 

"Bicycles are a means of 
transportation that have been 
long neglected here at Kansas 
State University," he said. 

Cook said the proposal is 
not specific in the objectives it 
is supposed to accomplish. 

"It does not specify how the 



permit funds will be used," he 
said. "Many of the regulations 
treat bicyclists unfairly com- 
pared to drivers of other vehi- 
cles." 

Other people addressed con- 
cerns about bicyclists potential- 
ly being threats to pedestrians. 

Tim Schrag. K-State police 
officer, said bicyclists need to 
be aware of how their actions 
can effect others' lives. 

"It all boils down to 
respect," he said. "It is a matter 
of respect and courtesy for 
other people." 

Other changes proposed at 
this year's hearing include 
increases in the misuse fee, 
parking meter fee and reserved- 
stall permits. 



Info Center funds debated 



TAWMYA 



Student Senate experi- 
enced a little bit of deja vu 
Thursday night. 

The budget for next year 
is still anybody's guess. 

Funding, or the lack there- 
of, for the K-State Info 
Center was cause for debate 
and held up action once 
again. 

The current budget pro- 



STUDENT 



SENATE 



posal, which eliminates all 
student funds for the Info 
Center, was vetoed by Ed 
Skoog, student body presi- 
dent. 

"I will veto any scenario 
that closes the doors of U- 



LcarN," Skoog said. 

An attempt was made to 
overturn it, but it failed just 
shy of the two-thirds needed. 

A new budget proposal 
was then presented to re- 
instate funding for the Info 
Center at about $7,650. This 
proposal was axed when 
amendments to cut the 
money passed again. 

Eventually, after other 
amendments to split the Info 



Center funding from the main 
budget and an attempt to 
rename the center Lazarus 
failed. Senate upheld its orig- 
inal budget proposal to bring 
the center's funding to $0. 

Skoog said it is likely he 
will veto it again. 

Sarah Caldwell, Finance 
chair, said student groups 
want to know what is hap- 

■ See SENATE Page 8' 



The battle for a parking 
spot in the K-State Union 
heated up Wednesday and 
Thursday due to some 
reserved spots set aside for 
special activities in the 
Union. 

Carl Lundeen, freshman in 
speech, was mad that the 
already-cramped lot was even 
worse. 

"I'm mad because this lot 
is for us," Lundeen said. 

"1 realize conventions are 
a money-making opportunity. 
I would be willing to take a 
tuition increase if it didn't go 
toward Union expansion but 
toward a bigger parking lot." 

Lundeen bought a parking 
permit for the fall semester 
but decided against buying a 
spring permit because of the 
luck he had finding a space. 

"You pay $50 buying a 
parking pass, then you are 
totally screwed trying to find 
a space," Lundeen said. 

At noon on Thursday, 



cramp parking 

Michele Meier, junior in 

business and Student Senate 
candidate, was waiting for a 
parking space so she could 
quickly check election results 
in the Union. 

"I just live a block from 
campus," Meier said. "I 
walked most of the time last 
semester." 

Even faculty members 
sometime find themselves 
without parking spaces. 

Beverly Murray, assistant 
professor of journalism who 
parks near Calvin, said her 
space isn't cheap, and she 
doesn't appreciate people 
parking in it. 

"My space costs me 
$21.50 a month," Murray 
said. 

Wednesday, she was lste 
for class and was forced to 
call a tow truck because 
someone had parked in her 
stall. 

"I drove around for 15 
minutes looking for another 
space," Murray said. 



Tribunal deliber ates grievances 

JJ^tmATm* qu»lific*iionb«n« other*. * "1EMWiLagiferV"| " "O 



"•efts 
Sroden Tribunal h*ard 

:■■■-,,.■,., he „.••<•..■ ,ni*e 

Mudeed who _h»rged that 
the Seastf Election 
Colintd tta* fti 1 ■: - t ride 
-..,. tfocei* m d : stu- 
de»< 



quali ticAuoo but not other*. 

Mo*! also made charge? 
that the committee had 
dented them doe process by 
not allowing them a fair 




' Shsnta Bailey, chair of 
:■ - Election Committee, 
explained why the commit- 
tee had allowed two student* 
«> #uy in the race and laid it 
had wemptsd to b* flexible 



hdattf^Ejp^EJ 

uV Elivtat Qwuauiwc 

<rary dccJalcnai 

sotaa 

i to be 




Bailey answered < 
charges by (tying the gnv. 
ehes coasmfcue made i 
decision* ov* of r»«r«*t 
jll iht whet candidatai that 

'. m ■-■- .' - •- ■ - i • ■ 

he t eirpettdjfun rty 
, tss tltnc 

l! ■>■ Ud'l the • ■'.' •■■in : ■ 
Ye*Vs lauust te deny due 
ks*»v" Bsitty tsad. "Pas 
>o» If other option would 

the parties t»< 
and bow fair would lh*l 43 j-,. 

».ipp.: 

TV open hearings were Leo Wall 

snihroi 




Q PrUimv, MHtl 16, 19»4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



©National News 




by the Associated Press 



■ 



► JUOCi SAYS EROTIC-MUSJC UW IS UMCOIMSTmmONAL ►LEAD€ffS NEPHEW 



OLYMPIA, WMh - A stata taw 
dsatgnsrj to kMp chlldran from buy- 
ing recordings with orotic lyrics vio- 
lates tha froa-apaach rights of adults 
and Is unconstitutional, tha state 
Supreme Court rulad on Thursday. 

Tha law, baaavad to ba lha flrst of 
Its kind in tha nation, navar took 
affact. it would have asowsd a coun- 
ty prosecutor to asK a ludge lo 
declare that a particular recording 
appealed to minors' prurient interests 
and offended community standards. 

H the judge agreed, the recording 
would have been forced to cany an 
"aduns-onry* label 

A dealer who refused to label and 
restrict tha recording's sales could 
have been fined $500 and sentenced 
to sot months m jal. 

Although tha state constitution 



permita tha Legislature to regulate 
speech' it conaidera harmful to 
minors, the erotic-music law also 
applies to adults and is an unconsti- 
tutional prior restraint of their protect- 
ed expression , Justice Charles Smith 
wrote in tha unanimous ruling. 

Adults may refrain from exercis- 
ing their rights for fear of sanctions 

The music industry warned that 
attempts at what they called censor- 
ship would be mounted. 

This decision wont stop people 
who are propone nta of this type of 
legislation," Washington Mualc 
Industry Coalition representative 
Richard White said. 'We are aura 
those people will try and And some 
loophole in tha law and will once 
again propose this type of censor- 
ship.* 



t> PRIEST APOLOGIZES TO GOD, VICTIMS FOR SEX CRIMES 



WHITE PLAINS, NY. — A 
Roman Catholic prlaat waa sen- 
tenced to the maximum eight years 
in prison Thursday tor taking at least 
11 boys out of the state for sex. 

Rev. Edward Pipala exhibited 
willful and evil behavior over a long 
period of time, U.S. District Judge 
Charles Brieant said. 

Pipala. a former priest at St. John 
the Evangelist Church In Goshen 
and Sacred Heart Church in Monroe, 
pleaded guilty last Jury to one felony 
count of transposing minora across 
state lines for sax between 1963 and 



MM. 

The boys ranged from ages 12 to 
16. Pipala said he took them to New 
Jersey and Cape Cod. 

Pipala admitted that he organized 
a club called the Hole" in which he 
supplied liquor and beer to boys, 
then engaged them in sex. Ha had 
the boys swear an oath of secrecy, 
authorities said. 

The priest apologized to God, his 
victims and parishioners. 

He also pleaded guilty in county 
court to sodomy and sexual abuse 
and will be sentenced today. 



► ARAFAT SAYS VIOLENCE DESIGNED TO DESTROY TALKS 

WASHINGTON — In a letter to to succeed. 



President Clinton, PLO Chairman 
Yasser Arafat strongly rejects 
attacks on Israeli civilians and says 
the violence is designed to destroy 
Arab-Israeli negotiations 

Tha letter was sent to tha White 
House through the U.S. Embassy in 
Tunis on Tuesday night. On 
Wednesday, another in a aeries of 
attacks look the lives of six Israelis 
on a bus in northern Israel. 

Clinton issued a statement con- 
demning the new attack in H sclera 
as a further attempt by extremists to 
derail the peace process. 

He said they must not be allowed 



White House press secretary Dee 
Dee Myers said Clinton telephoned 
Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin 
to express condolences over the 
Wednesday bombing and stressed 
the urgency of completing Implemen- 
tation of the Israeli- Palestinian peace 
accord. 

During the seven-minute conver- 
sation, Rabin agreed with the presi- 
dent on the need to reach prompt 
agreement, and cRnton made clear 
the United States Is ready for its part 
to ensure negotiations reach a suc- 
cessful conclusion as rapidly as possi- 
ble, Myers said in a statement. 



MORGAN CfTY, La. -A 
nephew of the president of 
Gabon abducted his ex-girt- 
friend, took her to a motel, 
then apparently committed 



Police responding to a 
call Wedrteaday found Jean 
Martin Alssat -Bongo, a 25- 
year-old student at the 
University of Southwestern 
Louisiana, dead of an appar- 
ently self-inflicted gunahot 
wound. 

The woman was not 
harmed. Her name was not 



AJaaat-Bongo was arrest- 
ed last month after a break-In 
at the women's home In 

Lafayette, about 70 miles 
from Morgan City In south- 
central Louisiana. 

► TEAMSTERS RALLY 
TO RESUME TALKS 

OVERLAND PARK — 
Striking Teamsters rallied 
Thursday outside the head- 
quarters of Yellow Freight 
System Inc., one of the "big 
tour* among trucking firms hit 
by a walkout last week, say- 
ing (hoy want talks to 



Union and management 

representatives announced In 
Washington they would 
return lo the bargaining table, 
possibly by Monday, with the 
strike to continue during the 
negotiations. 

The union had accused 
trucking company manage- 
ment of refusing to return to 
the table, while management 
said many employees want 
to go back to work. 

Several hundred 

Teamsters and sympathizers 
marched peacefully for less 
than half an hour In Iron! of 
the Yellow Freight htadquar' 
tera in this Kansas City sub- 
urb. 



K-STATE POLICE 



These reports are taken directly from the dally logs of the 
K State and Riley County Police departments. Because of 
apace constraints, not all Crimea are I 

THURSDAY, APRIL 14 

At 11:13 i.nt., Scott Hcrmrcck. E. Peicn Recreation Complex. 
1531 Ctmput Road, reported the Loss wis $91 
theft of his wallet it the Chester • 



RILEY COUNTY POLICE 



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13 

At 12:26 am , Robert ). diipute it Rusty'i Lui Chinee, 



Lingenfelter, 301 Poliiki Lane, 
ml arrested for battery follow- 
irtg * diipute with hii ton. Shane 
M. Lingenfelter. 301 Pol lit a 
Line, Bond wu set at $300. 

At 1:28 am, Adam 1. Mize, 
1507 Harry Road, was arret ted 
for [JUL Bond wu set at $500. 

At 1:59 a.m.. Michael I. 
Puppas. 1837 College Heights 
Ave., wis arretted for battery 
and disorderly conduct during a 



1 122 Mo«> St. Bond wu set it 
$300. 

At 3:26 a.m.. s dumpster fire 
waa reported by an employee of 
Burger King, 1328 Laramie Si. 
The Manhattan File Department 
wu dispatched and services 
were rendered. 

At 4:16 a.m., Jimiion 
Cawley. 299 Redbud Unites, 
wu snested for DU1. Bond wu 
setalSSOO. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



■ Administration of the mock LSAT will be from 1 1 :J0 am. to 
5 p m today In Union 206. 

■ Intramural free-throw contest will be at 6 p.m. Sunday in the 
Rec Complex large gymnuium. 

■ Ag Student Council Committee applications ire available in 
Waters 120 Applications are due to Waters 120 by noon April IB. 

■ James Lowell, consulting petroleum geologist from -Littleton. 
Cok>.. will present ■ lecture about structural styles in sedimentary 
basins from 6 lo 8 p.m. today in Thompson 213. 

■ Applications for co-hosts and production staff for the call-in 
uJk-radto show "A Purple Affair" are available in the Office of 
Student Activities and Services in the Union and at the DB92 stu- 
dios in McCain 317. Applications are due by 5 p.m. April 29. 



Find a mistake In the Collegltn. 
Cot Hi M W% COT OflTtCt It 



TOSTMASTER'S NOTICE 

The Kansas State Cotegian (USPS 291 020), a student newspa- 
per at Kansas Stale University, is published by Student Publications 
Inc., Kedzie Hal 103, Manhattan, Kan. 66506. The Cotegan is pub- 
lished weekdays dumg the school year and ones a *eek through 
the sumtner. Second cuss postage is paid at Manhattan, Kan. 
66502 

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Kansas State 
Collegian, circulation desk. Kedzie 103, 
Manhattan Kan 66506-7167. 



FRIDAY, APRIL IS 

■ InlerVinity Christian Fellowship will meet at 7 p.m. on the 
south side of the Union to cirpool to the barn party at the Swihuts'. 

■ K-Siaie Aikido Club will meet from 7 to 8:30 p.m. H 1 108 
Laramie St. 

■ KSU Women's Lacrosse will meet at 4 p.m. tt Memorial 
Stadium. No experience is needed to join. Call Miry it 587-4157 
for more information. 

■ Dr. Blair Jones, research geochemisi with the U.S. Geological 
Survey Water Resources Division, will present "Normative Analysis 
of Natural W«n" it 9:30 am in Thompson 213 

SATURDAY, APRIL IS 

■ Native American Student Body will meet it 6:13 p.m. in 
Union 202. 

■ Mirlatl Hill will have "Beach Bash" from 8 p.m. to midnight 
on the Marian third-floor lobby. 

SUNDAY, APRIL 17 

■ KSU Women's Lacrosse will meet it I p.m. in Memorial 
Stadium. 

■ Students for Disability Awareness will meet it 6 p.m. in 
Leisure 001. 

■ Pre -Occupational Therapy Club will meet at 9 p.m. in Union 
204 for officer elections 




YESTERDAY'S HIGHS AND LOWS 




SAUNA TOfEIH 



CfTY 



WICHITA* COFFtyytfJXE 

c/a» ■ *y 



TULSA 



TULSA i 
BS. as I 



Friday, windy and much cooler. 
Partly sunny Highs in the 
mid- 50s. Saturday, mostly sunny. 
Highs 60 to 70. 



"!■ 




Windy and cooler. 
Northwest winds 20 
to 30 mph. High 
around 55. 



TOMORROW 

Saturday, warmer 

-2f*"*£-| and mostly sunny. 

t\ | High 60 to 85, 








CLOSED CLASS LIST 






Summer 94 




1 




Fall 94 








00539 


03340 


00070 


04510 


07650 


10970 


15470 


19680 


24100 


27450 


31950 


00550 


03350 


00090 


04520 


08160 


10980 


15500 


19690 


24140 


27470 


31990 


00560 


03360 


00460 


05130 


08170 


10990 


15520 


19700 


24170 


27480 


32000 


00590 
00640 


03390 
03450 


00510 


05370 


08190 


11000 


15530 


19710 


25010 


27620 


32010 


01000 


05450 


08200 


11010 


15540 


19720 


25020 


27630 


32061 


01050 


05810 


08210 


11030 


15630 


19730 


25030 


27640 


32950 


00890 


03470 


01700 


05840 


08230 


11050 


15700 


19740 


25085 


27740 


33000 


00900 


03490 


02050 


05850 


08250 


11190 


15750 


19750 


25170 


27760 


33060 


00920 


03570 


02060 


05870 


08270 


11200 


15770 


19820 


25210 


28040 


33120 


00940 


03720 


02260 


05880 


08280 


11210 


15830 


20350 


25360 


28050 


33130 


00950 


03910 


02270 


05890 


08290 


11220 


15850 


20560 


25370 


28060 


33210 


00951 


03920 


02350 


05900 


08310 


11240 


15880 


20570 


25470 


28070 


33240 


00960 


03932 


02460 


05910 


08340 


11450 


15900 


20580 


25570 


28080 


33270 


01000 
01010 


04020 
04030 


02530 


05940 


08350 


11460 


15940 


20590 


25580 


28090 


33280 


02560 


05960 


08360 


11570 


15960 


20600 


25670 


28100 


33320 


02750 


05970 


08370 


11580 


16050 


20630 


25680 


26110 


33360 


01080 


04710 


02790 


05980. 


08380 


11620 


16060 


20640 


25690 


28120 


33370 


01150 


04770 


02820 


05990 


06390 


11630 


16180 


20650 


25700 


28130 


33450 


01160 


04841 


02830 


06000 


08450 


11840 


18210 


20660 


25710 


28140 


33533 


01290 


04851 


02940 


06040 


08460 


11660 


16230 


20670 


25720 


28150 


33810 


01340 


05940 


03010 


06050 


08520 


11700 


16250 


20680 


25730 


28160 


33720 


01440 


05950 


03020 


06090 


08650 


11720 


16260 


20690 


25750 


26170 


33790 


01660 


05960 


03030 


06110 


08730 


11750 


16270 


20700 


25850 


28180 


33600 


01670 
01680 


05970 
05980 


03040 


06120 


08850 


11760 


16280 


20710 


25860 


28190 


33810 


03050 


06130 


08880 


11790 


16290 


20720 


25940 


28360 


33820 


03060 


06140 


06890 


11820 


16330 


20750 


26450 


28370 


33860 


01740 


05990 


03070 


06150 


08900 


11830 


16370 


20760 


26540 


28410 


33890 


01750 


06000 


03080 


06170 


08920 


11930 


16390 


20810 


26550 


28630 


33900 


01760 


06210 


03090 


06190 


08970 


12410 


16440 


21120 


26560 


29491 


33940 


01770 


06330 


03100 


06300 


09130 


12470 


16490 


21130 


26570 


29501 


33960 


01780 


06340 


03110 


06320 


09140 


12510 


16530 


21140 


26620 


29511 


33970 


01790 


06350 


03120 


06340 


09150 


12910 


16550 


21150 


26660 


29620 


34040 


02080 


06360 


03130 


06390 


09180 


13300 


16590 


21180 


26670 


29791 


34050 


02231 
02320 


06370 
06480 


03250 


06650 


09220 


13340 


16640 


21190 


26700 


29690 


34060 


03270 


06660 


09230 


13420 


16650 


21210 


26720 


29930 


34070 


03320 


06690 


09240 


13430 


16680 


21230 


26730 


30370 


34100 


02340 


07660 


03430 


06700 


09310 


13460 


16700 


21361 


26740 


30400 


34130 


02360 


07790 


03470 


06730 


09570 


13470 


16940 


21470 


26750 


30720 


34150 


02380 


08380 


03520 


07100 


09760 


13490 


16950 


21570 


26770 


30760 


34520 


02470 


09070 


0363C 


07110 


10150 


13800 


17130 


21590 


26780 


30770 


34530 


02490 


09270 


03650 


07120 


10191 


14070 


17230 


21660 


26790 


30780 


34540 


02500 


80070 


03760 


07240 


10240 


14340 


17250 


21670 


26820 


30690 


34560 


02650 


80411 


03770 


07410 


10251 


14460 


17420 


21710 


26840 


30940 


34610 


02740 


80412 


03780 


07420 


10300 


14680 


17710 


22410 


26890 


30980 


34620 


02840 


80417 


03790 


07430 


10350 


14710 


17930 


22560 


26900 


31010 


34770 


03800 


07460 


10381 


15040 


18090 


22580 


26920 


31290 


35190 


02930 


80416 


03810 


07530 


10420 


15050 


18240 


22750 


27000 


31300 


36250 


03150 




03830 


07550 


10500 


15090 


18380 


22970 


27100 


31320 


35630 






03850 


07560 


10540 


15140 


18390 


23190 


27210 


31330 


35670 






03930 


07590 


10550 


15180 


18470 


23240 


27220 


31340 


38450 






03960 


07600 


10810 


15230 


18570 


23400 


27290 


31350 


385O0 






04000 


07610 


10650 


15240 


18580 


23430 


27300 
27340 


31360 


38530 






04460 


07620 


10800 


15260 


18590 


23500 


31370 


36560 






04470 


07740 


10830 


15300 


16600 


23620 


27360 


31810 


38670 






04480 


07780 


10940 


15330 


18610 


23630 


27370 


31630 








04490 


07770 


10950 


15340 


18950 


23750 


27430 


31900 








04500 


07840 


10980 


15390 


19200 


24020 


27440 


31910 




C — Cancwilaid Clati 


M 




■ 


















i 


'Closed class list also available In Unicorn 










with the Collegian. 

-N owyou can pick up your 

Collegian day or night. Stop by 

Bluemont, Calvin, Durland, 

Fairchild, Justin or Seaton HaHs 

before your night class for the latest 

edition of the Collegian. 




KANSAS STATE 

LEGIAN 

(east of Ihe Union) SJ2-4M0 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, April 15, 1094 3 



TT # f\ ORGAN DONATIONS ARE A HATTER OF 

Life** Death 



RHONDA WILSON 

Collegian 




san ll-vear-old, Ian 
Neal did not fully 

mpreh 

til he' 
in the operating room. 



comprehend death 
until be was lying 



It was when he was transferred 
onto the operating table thai he 
began to realize it might be the last 
time he would see his parents or the 
world. 

Outside of the operating room, 
lan's parents, Steve and Sue Neal, 
watched a team of doctors rush past 
them into the operating room carry- 
ing a little red Igloo cooler. 

Inside was lan's new heart. 

In 1990, he had been diagnosed 
as having an enlarged heart, and six 
months later, the doctors concluded 
he needed a new heart. 

Today, nearly three years after his 
heart transplant in 1 99 1 , lan's life is 
returning to' normal. 

"I don't even feel like he's a 
transplant patient, except for pop- 
ping drugs in the morning and at 
night," Sue Neal said. 
> Ian will be on anti-rejection med- 
ication for the rest of his life. 

One of his immediate goals is to 
compete in next year's Transplant 
Olympics, he said. These yearly ath- 
letic games are a competition for 
people who have had organ trans- 
plants. 

The Neals are appreciative of the 
donor's family, though they can't 
know who they are for legal reasons. 

"I can never replace the feelings I 
have for the people who donated," 
Steve Neal said as his eyes welled 
with tears. "There's no way to say 
thank you. 

"I wouldn't trade one moment of 
it — good and bad — because when 
I wake up and have my son with me, 
its a good day," he said. 

Sue said she also feels close to 
the donors. 



"I feel very close to these people, 
even though I don't know them," she 
uid. "[It's] not because the heart 
was their child's, but because they 
gave something that was, I consider, 
the most precious gift anybody can 
give." 

Carol Wehagc, a former neighbor 
of the Neals, is also familiar with 
organ and tissue donation from the 
donor side of the procedure. 

In 1992, her eldest son and lan's 
classmate, 1 2-year-old Jayme, was 
struck by a car while riding his bicy- 
cle. 

After being transferred to 
Stormont-Vail Regional Medical 
Center in Topeka, he had a massive 
stroke and was pronounced brain 
dead 

"Being from a family with a his- 
tory of donating, I would have been 
insulted if we hadn't been 
approached to donate," she said. 

"It was not something that we 
thought about at the time, but is 
important to note that if there's 
death, families should at least be 
offered the opportunity," Wehagc 
said. 

Jayme's organs were donated to 
save many others. His heart, liver, 
kidney and corneas went to different 
recipients or to research. 

Because there were ho recipients 
with a perfect match, some of his 
organs went to research, Wehage 
said 

Some have said that by donating 
the organs of a loved one, they feel 
like parf of their loved one lives on 
in the recipient, Wehage said she 
feels differently. 

"I would like rather that people 
would look at it as a gift that was 
given, that is no longer a part of 
Jayme," she said. 

"It is also a comfort for us that 
something good came out of the 
death," she said 

The Neal and Wehage families 
promote organ donation throughout 
■ See ORGAN Page 12 




NATIONAL ORGAN & TISSUE DONOR AWARENESS WEEK 



Apr! 17-23 b National Organ & Tissue Donor Awareness 
Weak. According to (he Uniform Anatomical Gift Act, 
anyone mho Is 18 or older and of sound mind, may 
become a donor <*hen they dte. ft you decite to become 
a donor complete an uniform donor card, tell others 
about your decision and carry your donor card. 

Where to go for more Information: 

► your physician 

► a local hosprtal 

► your local kidney, liver, lung or heart foundation 

► the nearest regional transplant group or organ bank 



Organ ml Urn* 
derations imy bt uMd for 

trsntptsnts ind fisurcri. 
K'tpostMt to transport 
25 onwmt oraarts and 



Number of people waiting for a transplant - 



Heart 
2.906 



> corneas ► ikn 
r bone marrow 
> bone and cartilage 

For more information 

contact: 

MKjwest Organ Bank, Inc. 

1WQW.47tr,,Swte«0 

Weslwood.KS 66205 

1913)262-1666 




Kidney 

25,502 

Dual transplants 
Heart-Lung -204 
Kidney -Pancreas— 207 



Tissues -500,000 



jOuror MkfcvMt Organ Sank, inc 



Sue Neal 

and Ian, her 
15-year-old 
son, are 
active sup- 
porters of 
organ dona- 
tion and am 
buay prepar- 
ing for 
National 
Organ* 
Tissue Donor 
Awareness 
Weak, April 
17-23. 



CciaakHi 



H WtwARt AWDERSoH/CoMSVir; 



KSU STUDENTS ONLY! 



$1 OFF COUPON 



World's Greatest Haircut 

Reg. *7" 

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OPEN NIGHTS AND SUNDAYS 
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•VILLAGE PLAZA 

539-4043 
(NearALCO) 

•431 E. Poyntz 
77»-6410 
(K-MART Plaza) 

: 8-31-94 



Expires: 



Kansas State University's 

Department of English and 

Shenandoah Shakespeare Express 

1994 Tongues Like Knives Tour 




present Shakespeare's 

"TAMING OF THE SHREW" 
7:30 P.M.,Tues.,Apr. 19, 1994 &&* 

* » r (12 person 

K-State Student Union, Main Ballroom S6 student 

Foe Qckao and inTormeaoa regirding the jxe-perfor nrunct banquet and the poet- 
perfonnance reception, contact the Dept. of Engliih m Denton Hill or call 532-6716 



Native American Heritage Month 

Guest Speaker 

Martha Kreipe de Montano 

Manager, Resource Center of the National Museum of 
the American Indian/Smithsonian Institution 

"The New National Museum of the 
American Indian: Its History, 

Friday, April 15 
Union 212, 11:30 a.m. 




Jobs! 



Summer Jobs In Wichita and 
Kansas City arm available* 

Permanent/Part-Time 
darling at $5.30 en Hour 

Wanted: People to take inventory in retail stores. 

Weekday mornings and weekends-mostly on Sundays. 

Math aptitude a must Ten-key calculator experience is 

helpful, but not necessary. Apply in person. 

Manhattan Job Service 

621 Humboldt 




Little Caesars Pizza 



e Extra 

SH? 




At Manhattan "Biomedical Center you can 

earn $30 per weel(J$15 each, time) 

donating plasma, your donation wiCC also 

heCp improve the wett-bevng of others, 

^MANHATTAN 
BIOMEDICAL 
CENTER 

1130Gardenway • 776-9177 
Moa-Frl 9 a.m. -6:30 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m. -2 p.m. 



PIZZA MENU la 

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CHOOSE '*°*< 1HIM TOtHHOa: 



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CAM A (a SANDWICHES 

iuiuo Sub i 

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Tinker — 

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Call. Dial Cat*. Sortie. 
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-IZXAIi 

toe 



MANHATTAN 

Anderson & Seth Childs 

(VttSTLOOP CENTER) 

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PINION 




In Our Opinion 



By tht Collegian Editorial Board 



Union parking belongs to students 



K*tetedo«s 

not tunm tn# 



to pao pl » who 
want to vHtt in 




There aren't nearly enough parking spaces 
for students on this campus, We know thai. 

So, why are there hundreds of student park- 
ing spaces blocked off every time there is an 
event that involves non-students? 

On Thursday, there were 150 spaces blocked 
off in the Union parking lot, and today there 
will be 130. 

The students who fight for parking spaces in 
the student lots have paid about $25 a semester 
to park. 

Many who park in the metered lot do so 
because it is the only available parking on 
campus. 

For those who don't know, Lot A-29 (the 
metered Union lot) was once student parking. 
That lot was built with student fees and was 
intended to be the students' parking lot 

In 1988. the lot was changed to metered 
parking. Students not only lost the upper half 
of the lot, they also had to split spaces with 
faculty in the lower lot. 

Sounds like students have gotten the shaft 
quite a few times. 

According to the Council on Traffic, 
Parking and Police Operations, there were 



7,452 permits told to faculty, staff and stu- 
dents. 

That's 7,452 permits sold for the privilege 
of parking in 4,355 available spaces, 

K- State does not have the extra parking 
spaces to give to people who want to visit in 
large numbers. 

No group visiting this campus should have 
the privilege of taking parking spaces paid for 
by students. 

It is not fair that the spaces students have 
paid for are taken away from them. 

And the notices that parking officials have 
given the Collegian are not done in sufficient 
time to allow students to make other plans. 

We want people to visit K- State, and we 
want the business they bring to the University 
and Manhattan. But there is a better way to get 
them to campijs. 

Why not have these groups park out at 
Bramlage Coliseum? They could be bused to 
campus like groups who come for Landon 
Lectures. 

People visit, and they need a place to park. 
But taking the spaces the students have paid 
for is not the way to do it. 



Religion and Rock 
share same inspiration 



Back in tKe US. of A 





One of the great things 
about K-State is that 
it attracts most every 
type. of person from around ' 
the world. 

It seems that every walk of life is 
represented and welcomed here. 
Why, on the northwest side of town, a 
mosque has been erected so our 
growing Muslim community can 
enjoy the freedoms guaranteed by the 
First Amendment. 1 must say, nothing 
makes me prouder to be an American 
than seeing a church built or going to 
a great rock concert. 

Indeed, rock music and religion 
have never been on easy footing. 
From the time southern ministers 
decried the "nigger music," the white 
kids were digging in the 1950s, rock 
and religion have been at odds. 

In the '70s, there was a surge of 
Jesus rock, which put groovy music 
to far-out lyrics praising that Jewish 
carpenter's son. And, of course, there 
were Amy Grant and Stryper in the 
'80s successfully mixing Top 40 and 
the Big 66. Other than these and a 
few other exceptions, rock and reli- 
gion have been enemies. 

I don't understand this bad blood. 
Is it over lyrics? Is it over the tech- 
niques some ministers use to increase 
their flocks? Or is it just reciprocated 
arrogance? 

Both parties involved believe their 
ideas are the most correct; yet, they 
can only substantiate their beliefs 
with subjective faith and understand- 
ing. If one religion or speaker had a 
monopoly on truth, every person on 
Earth would believe the same things. 
Truth is, by nature, an individual 
essence. 

It's obvious freedom of speech 
and worship are entwined in the First 
Amendment of the Bill of Rights. 
Granted, the Supreme Court hasn't 
given speech or religion blanket pro- 
tections or even equal protection. 
However, the protection of the* words 
of rock singers and rappers should be 
afforded to ministers and sidewalk 
evangelists lest both albums and 
altars are quieted. 

Either we all have the same right 
to speak our minds, or none of us do. 

Most all speech has a grain of 
truth and some validity in subtext, if 
not in content. I do not agree with 
how Snoop Doggy Dogg or Guns n* 
Roses depict women and life in gen- 
eral. For me, the real value of those 
two recording artists is what they tell 
the rest of us about their lives and 
how their experiences have shaped 




SCOTT 



Miller 



their views of the world. It keeps us 
from believing our life is the only 
life. 

There have always been people 
like them. Rock gave them a voice. 
Religion 
makes voices 
hopeful. 

Ministers 
likewise have 
ideas to 
express and 
many ways to 
express them. 
Some pray 
silently in rec- 
tories, others 
shout on the 
street comer. 
Whatever 
method is best 
for them is 
how they 
should choose 
to preach as long the rights of others 
to be left alone is respected. 

Some listeners aren't moved by 
zealotry and prefer ministry that 
appeals to the intellect. Others can 
only be moved by a more charismatic 
delivery. As a Christian, I believe 
God speaks to us the way we need to 
be spoken to. 

Musicians, by the way, also use 
the decibel level and sound that best 
fits their music and that their audi- ; 
ences expect. A favorite band of ', 
mine, Sound garden, would be diffi- ! 
cult to appreciate in a small coffee- | 
house. Likewise, bluegrass bands in 
Kemper Arena would be out of place. 
Yet, the messages come across well 
in die proper venue. 

Inspiration, the power behind 
music and religion, knows the right 
time and place even when we in the 
"audience" of life aren't even aware 
of where we are. 

I propose that b«U».rec ordinj, 

lists and those In other medTi\ 
including columnists and journalists, 
drop our smug ideas about what is 
right and wrong for everyone else 
because we can only know what is 
right and wrong for our individual 
selves. 

The message of Jesus Christ was 
to love each other as we love our- 
selves and to follow Divine teach- 
ings. The message behind rock music 
is to enjoy life and look after and 
respect the world we're in. Is that so 
hard to do? More importantly, are 
those ideas really so incompatible? 

Scott Alton Millar I* a junior in radio and 
talavlaton. 



ar 




► EDITORIALS 



BSU members not infallible — they 
should learn to keep egos in check 

Dear Editor, 

To the Black Student Union: Stop your sniveling. 
Try to put your egos on the shelf and leant to take 
criticism like mature adults. 

You're not infallible, unreproachable deities. As 
an editorial cartoonist, Mike Marlett is entitled to 
express his opinions, whether you like them or not. 

I hope sincerely that the Collegian docs not acqui- 
esce in the slightest to your bully tactics. 

Aaron Hitchcock 
junior/mechanical engineering 

► ■DiTORJAL HUMOR 

Apologize by Wednesday, BSU, or 
you're off my Christmas card list 

Dear Editor, 

To Jawwad A. Abdulhaqq and Syvette Davis of. 
the Black Student Union — you are being just plain 
silly. 

Shanta Bailey is a person holding not one but two 
very important positions in student government. 

Her work in those positions is very much open to 
public scrutiny. I don't know what definition of the 
word "libel" you are using, but it certainly is not the 
definition used by the United Slates' legal system. 

Besides the Collegian's legal right to print the car- 
toon in question, it did not attack Bailey in the car- 
toon. 

1 doubt that anyone with more than two synapses 
firing in their oV noggin actually thought that Bailey 
chose the candidates by using a dartboard 

The editorial cartoon (notice the word "editorial") 
was merely poking fun at the ineptness with which 
the Election Committee and Grievance Committee, 
both led by Bailey, are handling the present election. 



One last point. For you to introduce the question of 
race in the so-called "attack" on a member of your 
community is utterly irresponsible. By doing this, you 
only trivialize the real problems faced by minority 
students on this campus. 

I think that you should apologize to the rest of the 
minority students on campus for embarrassing them. 

I'll give you until next Wednesday before I take 
you off my Christmas card list. 

Michael S. Kitchen 
senior/secondary education 

► aLlCTION CONTROVERSY 

Cartoon just satire; Bailey a target 
for her part in election fiasco 

Dear Editor, 

The cartoon in .Wednesday's Collegian depicting 
the Grievance Committee and Election Committee 
chair Shanta Bailey was, in my opinion, simply a 
piece of political satire. 

When public figures are involved in an occurrence 
that appears questionable or causes controversy, they 
become prime targets for political cartoonists who 
take aim at their actions and sometimes at their char- 
acter. 

The intent of the attack is not personal harm or 
libel, but an attempt to poke fun at or bring humor to 
the occurrence or to the person involved in it. 

Every day in certainly every newspaper in the 
country, local and national public figures are mocked, 
and their actions and words are made fun of. 

This is part of the price that a person pays upon 
entering public service. 

Although I cannot speak for Mr. Marlett or the 
Collegian editorial staff, the cartoon made fun of the 
current controversy surrounding this semester's stu- 
dent-government elections and Ms. Bailey's involve- 
ment in them. 

The cartoon attempted to make light of the situa- 
tion and emphasize the Collegian's position that 
simultaneous student governor membership in the 
Election and Grievance committees, including Ms. 



Bailey's, was a questionable practice. 

A iron S. Cooper 
senior/mechanical engineering 

► COMPLAIHT» 

Shame on Collegian — you need to 
take some of the blame, too 

Dear Editor, 

"Election botched; new one in order." The 
Collegian states that the Election Committee has put 
"every K- State voter on a tightrope." However, the 
Collegian itself has played a major role in making the 
1994 Senate elections a "farcq." 

The front-page headlines on Wednesday were 
completely out of line and unfair not only to the 
Election Committee but to all who are running for 
office. , 

The mistakes that have been made by the Election 
Committee arc correctable ... the run-off election 
April 20 provides this opportunity. For the Collegian 
to assert that a completely new election needs to be 
held exaggerates the severity of the matters at hand. 

Also, using the front page to express the viewpoint 
of the Collegian staff is a blatant misuse of the power 
of the press. 

I would recommend that the Collegian use valu- 
able front-page space not to criticize but to help 
advise voters on changes. 

The Collegian has done a disservice to all candi- 
dates as it discourages voters to utilize their right to 
vote by insinuating that a vole goes to a worthless 
cause. ' 

Finally, the Collegian should not go to the 
extreme, suggesting that the Elections Committee 
must either resign or be impeached for their errors. 
Take note of the numerous corrections that had to be 
made for the Collegian's careless mistakes. Using 
Collegian mentality, the editor should be fired and all 
staff members replaced. 

Molly Hofmcier 
senior/political science 



► ABORTION 



Nazi parallel to abortion only done 
to show tragedy in our own country 

Dear Editor, 

I would like to respond to the letter by Lauren 
Markley in the Collegian Wednesday. 

Lauren, you either missed the rest of the video or 
you simply chose to ignore it. The point was not to 
trivialize what happened during the Holocaust; it was 
to show the parallel between what happened in Nazi 
Germany and what is happening here in America. 

As shown on the video, in Nazi Germany, the 
court declared that Jews were non -persons and had no 
rights as persons under the taw. It was legal to kill 
Jews, and, in fact, it was illegal to try and save Jews. 

We all know that this was wrong. In 1973. the U.S. 
Supreme Court said the unborn child was a non-per- 
son under the law. It is legal to kill unborn children; 
in fact, it is illegal to try and save unborn children, 

I have been to Dachau and have seen what was 
done to the Jews. The cries of "Never again!" echo 
through the camp, the barracks and the gas chambers. 

In no way are their deaths trivialized by what was 
on that video. Instead, it amplifies the cries of the 
helpless victims coming from those death camps. 

"Never again" should the innocent be subjected to 
the suffering, torture and slaughter of the Holocaust. 
Yet, there is a different holocaust here in America. 
Thirty one million babies have died from abortion 
since 1973. 

It is happening again; the difference is these help- 
less, innocent victims cannot cry out for themselves. 

Yes, Lauren, 1.5 million babies die every year 
from abortion. Hitler killed about 800,000 Jews per 
year from 1939 to 1945. Strictly speaking of "numeri- 
cal figures," Hitler was a "lightweight." 

This does not mean what he did is less important. 
It means that it is happening again on a larger scale to 
unborn children. 



Patrick Root 

freshman/vice president for Students for the Right 

to Life 



I 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, April 15, 1994 



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British comedy best of season 



Cotkgjjui 

Anglophiles, take note! A 
smashing production of William 
Congreve's British comedy, "The 
Way of the World," has opened at 
Nichols Theater. 

With all sincerity, this play is 
one of the most enjoyable and well- 
acted plays of the K-State Theater 
season. Everyone and everything 
about this play is perfect. 

Ayne Stcinkuehler, playing 
Mil lament, was simply ravishing. 

Her chatterbox dialogues and 
indecisive manner was unbeliev- 
ably natural. 

The language of the play is diffi- 
cult and sometimes hard to compre- 
hend, bul Stcinkuehler makes the 
most of every one of her scenes. 

She brings a fresh air to her 
character that is so entrancing, you 
literally can't take your eyes off of 
her. 

Any fan of Emma Thompson 
will relish in delight with 
Stcinkuehler' s phenomenal perfor- 
mance. 

Opposite Stcinkuehler is David 
Reed, playing Mirabel I. Reed man- 
ages to pull off one of the more lik- 
able male parts with ease. 

The scenes with Mirabel! and 
Millament are a hoot. Reed holds 
his own against Steinkuehler's 
incessant prattle. 

His Mirabel I is one that is at lib- 
erty with himself. He knows what 
he wants. 




He 
understands 
how to 
workpeo- 
ple into 
granting 
him what 
he desires. 

There 
arc many 
inspired 
perfor- 
mances in 
"World." 
Marci 

Corey, playing the matriarchal 
Lady Wishfon, is too much fun. 

Her line deliverance is mar- 
velous. When she was on stage, the 
audience was given to great laugh- 
ter. 

Rachel Pearson, playing Foible 
(Wishfon's housekeeper), was deli- 
cious ly likable. 

Although she got caught up in 
practically every scandal and 
incredible scheme in the play, she 
maintained a certain "middle-of- 
the-road" charm. 

There is one particularly hilari- 
ous scene involving both Pearson 
and Corey. 

Pearson is tying up Corey's 
corset (behind her back), and she 
pulls and tugs at on it, forcing 
Corey into some, well, uncomfort- 
able positions. 

Carrie Gilhousen, as Mrs. 
Fainall, was so sweet and gracious. 
Her quiel and well-mannered stage 



presence is a wonderful quality. 

Two of Millamcnt's admirers, 
Witwoud and Petulant, played by 
Stephen Scely and Patrick 
Silkman, respectively, arc screams. 

They fare very will as character 
actors, managing to definitely liven 
things up on stage. 

The best chemistry, between 
couples, in the show was arguably 
Mr. Fainall, played by Ryan Ritter, 
and Miss Marwood, played by Jami 
Kruscmark. 

They were very believable as the 
two plotted against the marriage 
plans of Mirabell and Millament. 
K ruse mark, playing Marwood, was 
especially devilish. 

Director Lew She I ton has defi- 
nitely got a hit on his hands. This 
play is very audience- friendly. 

His direction is easy to under- 
stand. There are never any ques- 



tionably-staged scenes. 

None of the actions onstage 
seem contrived. His actors aren't 
forcing lines like they don't know 
what is oceunng. 

His approach to this difficult 
play is commendable. 

The stage design is superb. 
David A. Centers has grasped every 
aspect of the tit nouveau style. 

Although Wishfort's house is 
sparsely furnished, one gets the 
feeling of heavy Victorian without 
actually seeing it. 

Costume Designer Deborah L. 
B run si m envisioned every nuance 
of turn ni ihf icniury haute cou- 
ture. 

Period pieces are always the 
most fun visually, and these two 
designers fully understand that 
notion. 



CONGRATULATIONS 
K-STATE SINGERS 



One of six Show Choirs selected 

In a national audition to perform 

at Collegiate Showcase 

Invitational In Chicago. 




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PORTS 



GIVE EVERYONE A SHOT 

ST. LOUIS (AP) -in the St. Louis Cardinals' bullpen, tie telephone is always ringing. 

Counting starters, in the first nine games manager Joe Torre hat used 36 pitchers - an average 
of more than lour per game. For one thing, he has 11 pitchers, one more than most teams, 
"Yeah, I've used a lot of pitchers, out they're not pitching a lot," Torre said. They're just 
getting an inning here and an inning there." 



TomJUbury 

outlines hi* plan 
to rebuild the 
K-State baeketball 
program m ■ fast, 
up temp o offense 
during his tint 



oonfsfence at 
K-State. Aabury 
isehoduladto 



returning Wildcat 
players Thursday 
aflamoonto 
dtaeuH next yaar. 



Cotagian 




Wave of the future arrives at K-State 



"Wa are going 
to try and 

entertain tha 
fan* because 



TTWY JOHNSON 
CallniM 



T 



he man can talk the talk 
of K-State basketball. 



entertaining 
business. 
Thara la no 
doubt we are 
In the 

•ntartalnment 
business." 

Tom Asbury 

K -Stats men's 
I coach 



Tom Asbury, who has never coached in the 
Big Eight Conference, showed lhat he did know 
one of the most important factors in keeping 
alumni and students happy. 

He said he hoped to be winning against Roy 
Williams and the Jayhawks soon. 

"Sure, we're going after Roy. but we're 
going after everybody. 

"1 know that's important around here." 

Asbury was introduced by K-State Athletic 
Director Max Urick as K-State' s new head bas- 
ketball coach Thursday at a press conference in 
the Big 8 Room of the K-State Union. 

'Tom Asbury is much more than statistics." 
Urick said. 'Tom is a winner in every way. He 
also is a very effective leader of young men. He 
is ethical." 

Urick 's buildup did not seem to swell the 
head of Pepperdine's former head coach. When 
he stepped up to the podium, Asbury took a 
decidedly more down-to-earth approach. 

"That was an unbelievable build-up there." 
Asbury said. "Initially, 1 would like to say that I 
am really honored to be your new head basket- 
ball coach here at K-State." 

Asbury paid homage to K-State basketball 
history during his press conference. 

"You've got a heritage of great coaches, and 
this is a great program here," Asbury said. "I'm 
just hopeful that myself, my staff and my play- 
ers can continue at this institution in a compara- 
ble fashion." 

Asbury attempted to answer one of the main 



questions that he said was probably on the 
minds of everyone, 

"A lot of people would say. 'Why would you 
go and get a Californian to take this job?' There 
is probably some merit to that. 

"And yet, 1 grew up in Colorado. I've logged 
a lot of time in this region, and 1 understand it." 

The quality of the Big Eight, the enthusiasm 
of the K-State administration and the quality of 
the athletic facilities were the three main rea- 
sons Asbury said he accepted the coaching job. 

"1 grew up in Colorado, and 1 can remember 
as a kid watching the Big Eight Conference," 
Asbury said. "I played in the WAC, but I think 
my heart was always in the Big Eight- I think 
that probably initially was the first focal point 

"Once 1 made a visit here, 1 think there were 
a couple of other things that came into effect. 
Probably the next thing would have been the 
interest and the passion from the administration. 

'The facilities here are probably the third 
thing that enticed me. 1 think we have facilities 
here comparable to anywhere in the country," 
he said. 

After listing why he decided to take the new 
job, Asbury got down to the business end of 
what he had to get done. 

One of the most important aspects he dis- 
cussed was the Cats* recruiting prospects. 

The late signing period began Wednesday, 
and K-State and Asbury are decidedly behind in 
the recruiting process. The Cats still have two 
scholarships remaining, but the viability of 
some of the recruits signed while Dana Aliman 
was coach is questionable. 

Mark Young, the blue-chip standout from 
Baton Rouge, La., has said he may not fulfill 
his pledge to come to Manhattan. 

"We are going to do everything in our power 
to get this guy to come play at Kansas Stale," 
Asbury said. "Now. he siill needs to do one 



thing. He has to raise his academic standards a 
little bit." 

Asbury and Campbell also said they had 
talked to the oiher recruits who have already 
signed with the Cats. 

"Of course it is late. Today is the signing 
period — lhat is how late it is," Asbury said. 
"But we have lime. There are quality players 
out there, and we are going to get after them." 

Asbury also addressed the possibility of 
staffing changes on the Wildcat bench. 

"Staffing is a concern," Asbury said. "I am a 
very loyal person. 

"If you are asking me who my logical staff 
considerations are, well, other man outside my 
own staff, I haven't got lo mttca past that." 

One of the important shifts in the program 
many people expect is the Cats' style of play. 
Asbury promotes a mn-and-gun offense. 

"We are going to play as fast as we can play 
well," Asbury said. "We are going to full-court 
press. We are going to extend our defense. We 
are going lo utilize our talents and abilities to 
the very best thai we can. 

"We are going to recruit with that theory in 
mind. This has been my philosophy that I've 
always had — this is no different. As fast as 
you can play well — does that mean average 
75, 85. 95? As fast as we can play well." 

Asbury's shift in play will likely be more 
popular among fans and alumni. The reason 
Asbury focuses on an exciting offense is to 
entertain. 

"We are going to play an entertaining brand 
of basketball," Asbury said. "That doesn't mean 
we want to go out and get beat 140-120. But, 
we are going to play an up-tempo type of game. 
We arc going to try and entertain the fans 
because we are an entertaining business. There 
is no doubt we are in the entertainment busi- 
ness." 



BIO BIGHT BASKETBALL 



There goes Johnny 



oaajai 

No more "Here's Johnny." 

No more "double-ding- 
dongers." 

No more Johnny Orr on the 
sidelines. 

After 14 years with the Iowa 
State program. Coach Johnny Orr 
stepped down Thursday as head 
coach of the Cyclones. 

Blinking back tears, Orr made 
hit announcement from a stage in 
Hilton Coliseum in front of TV 
cameras and cheering fans. 

"Having fulfilled my contract as 
basketball coach for 14 years to the 
best of my ability, it is my decision 
to resign this responsibility." Orr 



Orr offered some consolation to 
fans by announcing he will assume 
toe position of associate athletic 
r beginning July 1, 1995. 



"This decision has been 
extremely difficult, but in my esti- 
mation, is the only professional 
action available to benefit the long- 
range reputation of our basketball 
program," Orr said. 

"This way, 1 think I did it in a 
class way and a good way for the 
school." 

The announcement ended his 
34-year college coaching career. 
He spent 12 years at Michigan 
before taking the coaching position 
at Iowa State. 

Orr came to Ames in 1980 and 
revived a program thai hadn't been 
to a postseason tournament in more 
than 40 years. With Orr at the 
helm, the Cyclones made six 
NCAA appearances and played 
once in the NIT. 

He holds the most victories for 
an Iowa Stale basketball coach, 
with a record of 2 1 8-200. He is the 
only coach to have the most wins 



at two Division-I schools. 

In an interview one day before 
making his announcement, Orr was 
still undecided about his future. 

"I haven't made up my mind 
yet." he said. 'T II talk to my fami- 
ly tonight, and I'll talk to my wife 
in the morning. If I could tell you. 
I'd tell you. Hell, if I knew. I'd tell 
you. I don't know, so, hell, if I 
knew, I'd tell everybody." 

In his years at Iowa State. Orr 
gained popularity with the fans by 
not only selling the program, but 
also selling himself. 

During his first year with the 
Clones, the 52-year-old Orr partici- 
pated in Iowa State's VE1SHA cel- 
ebration, jumping on a trampoline 
and sitting at the dunking booth. 

As the number of Iowa State 
wins grew, Orr's colorful quotes 
soon became part of the Iowa 
spom jargon. 

If Coach Johnny thought a par- 
ticular game was going to be a 
"doublc-ding-donger," fans knew it 
was big. 

With his retirement, Orr is the 




Johnny Orr 

gives his players 
moral support 
while standing on 
the sidelines 
during the 
K- State-Iowa 
State game earlier 
this season. Orr 
retired Thursday 
after 14 years as 
the Cyclone head 
coach. 

DAMWN WMTLIY 

Coftagivi 



third Big Eight coach to leave the 
conference this year, along with K- 
State's Dana Altman and 
Oklahoma's Billy Tubbs, 

Concluding his announcement, 
Orr thanked his fans for their con- 
tinued support throughout the 
years, reminding them that he 
would always be a Cyclone. 

"And please remember, I'll 
never stop cheering. Go Cyclones." 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 

Cats may exit 
Agler's team 






K-State hopes 

to recover 

from losses 

to Nebraska 



Col kg Ian 

The K-State baseball team will try to 
salvage a five-game series with Nebraska 
by playing the final three games at Buck 
Beltzer Stadium in Lincoln, Neb. 

The Wildcats, 1 1-26 overall and 2-12 in 
the Big Eight, lost the first two games of 
the series Wednesday at Frank Myers 
Field. 14-4 and 15- 1 . to the Comhuskers. 

Coach Mike Clark said he hopes K 



State can fight back in the series, which 
begins at 7 p.m. today. 

"I hope we can challenge them," Clark 
said after Wednesday's second game. "This 
becomes an important series. We got them 
lulled to sleep thinking they can show up 
and beat us." 

Clark will send Jon Oiseth, whose 
record is 4-5 this season, to the mound 
tonight. Eric Yanz (0-3) will start 
Saturday's game at 3 p.m., and Adam 



Novak (0-3) will pitch the final game for 
the Cats at I p.m. on Sunday. 

Third baseman Todd Fereday, who hit 
three home runs in the doublehcader. said 
the team needs to do well in Lincoln. 

"We're still shooting to win as many 
games as we can and make the Big Eight 
Tournament," Fereday said. "We definitely 
have to take a couple of wins up there. If 
we come out of there 2- 1 5, we are going to 
struggle to find a win." 




Grattan 



CoHtfin 

Speculations ol players transferring were con- 
firmed on Thursday, as at least one member of 
the women's basketball team said she is consid- 
ering not returning to the team next fall. 

Mendy Benson, a freshmen post player from 
Kenai. Alaska, said she might not return to K- 
State next year. 

"I'm looking at schools on the West and East 
coasts," Benson said. "So 
far, I have contacted at 
least five other schools. I 
can't say which ones, 
though." 

A story in the Kansas 
City Star on Thursday 
reported that Dana Pollock, 
Joey Ward, Stacy Neal, 
Dionnc Burwell and 
Benson were reportedly 
considering transferring to 
other schools. 

"It is a possibility," 
Neal said. "I just want to go somewhere where I 
will contribute a lot." 

Neal said it is still possible she could return lo 
K-State next season. 

Benson said the main reason for her possible 
departure has to do with playing time. 

"1 think that I could be happier somewhere 
else," Benson said. "A lot of my considerations 
to leave has lo do with playing time. I won't 
make my final decision until school is out." 

The Star also reported that Jo More e Grattan 
will not be returning to the team next year, but 
she will stay enrolled at K-State. 

K-State coach Brian Agler said he couldn't 
comment on the departure situation of some of 
his players. 

"Nothing is official yet, so it would be unfair 
for me to comment on them," Agler said. "We 
are in constant communication with our players 
throughout the spring." 

Shawnda DeCamp, the Cats leading scorer 
this past season, said she thinks she knows why 
some of the players are considering transferring. 

"1 can't really tell you who is thinking about 
leaving," DeCamp said. "A big reason that they 
are considering leaving could be because they're 
not getting very much playing time." 

Agler said he agreed with DeCamp. 

"We are trying to keep everyone happy with 
what they are doing right now," Agler said. "This 
is especially true for our older players." 



Netters to get tournament 
practice while in Oklahoma 

CRAIO PINKIRTON 



Oaaava 

Before diving into the Big Eight 
Championship in Oklahoma City on April 22, the 
women's tennis team will test the waters of 
Oklahoma. 

If the conference tournament were to begin 
today, the netters, who are seventh place in the 
conference standings, would have to play the No. 
2 seed. Right now, it appears their opponent will 
be either Oklahoma or Oklahoma State in the 
first round. 

On Sunday, the Cats travel to Stillwater, 
Okla., to take on Oklahoma State. On Monday, 
they will continue south to Norman, Okla., to do 
battle with the nationally ranked Oklahoma 
Sooners. 

OUTDOOR TRACK sssssssssWHaaaaasi 

Broxterman returns 



Track teams from the Big Eight Conference, 
the Southwest Conference and small colleges 
from Oklahoma will compete Saturday in the 
John Jacobs Invitational in Norman, Okla. 

K-State will take 35 athletes to the meet, 
including Ed Broxterman, who returns to the 
high jump after a short time off. 

"1 competed nine or 10 weeks in a row," 
Broxterman said. "I was getting tired of travel- 
ing. The break really helped." 

Broxterman competed at the NCAA Indoor 
National Championships in Indianapolis, the 
College Station Relays at Texas A&M and the 
Arizona Shoot -oa] in Tnranaj, Ariz. 



Sports Digest 

► HEFTY DEPARTS COLORADO 

BOULDER, Colo. — Colorado point 
guard Pate Hatty, whoso playing time 
was cut last year, has decided to leave 
as three guard prospects have signed 
national letters ot intent to join the 
Buffaloes. 

Hefty, one ot the nation's top too 
high-school players in 1991, made 17 
starts in 1992-93, but that dropped to 
three last season He averaged 14 min- 
utes and 2.9 points a game last sea- 
son. 



L. 



■ — ■ - 



__^_^— 



■ 7 




N FOCUS 



Friday, April 15, 1994 



Paul Schley, 

Manhattan, feeds 
the camala every 
morning during 
the winter end 
•arty spring. In 
the summer 
months, the herd 
reed on brush and 
wooden shrubs. 




in Kansas? 




A male, a female and a newborr camel Is not what on* would normally expect to sea traveling Interstate 70 through the Flint Hills, but Hudson Ranches has been using camels for brush control for the past five years. 





The large bull ballowe out to one of the cows who won't 
stray too far from her newborn calf. 

Photos by Matt Leffingwetl Story by Amy Ztofller 



f you're driving east 
along Interstate 70 
toward Topeka, don't be 
surprised if you see 
a camel roaming 
the landscape. 



A ranch a few miles outside the Little 
Apple is home to seven camels. 

"If you didn't drive down 1-70, you 
wouldn't even know they were there." Steve 
Field, conservation officer for Kansas 
Department of Wildlife and Parks, said. 
"They cause no problem as far as I can see." 

Their owner, A.B. Hudson, chief executive 
for Highway Oil, 
bought the camels 
five years ago from 
an exotic animal 
farm in Cape 
Girardeau, Mo., to 
eat the weeds and 
brush in his pasture. 

Hudson manages 
five ranches in 
Texas, Kansas. 
Missouri, Nebraska 
and Colorado and 
has camels at three 
of his ranches, 
including the Aye 
ranch outside of 
Manhattan on Deep 
Creek Road. 

The camels share 
the rolling hills with 
other types of live- 
stock arid are treated 
the same as cattle 
by the ranch hands. 

"They eat the 
same thing a cow 

eats and require no extra care," Dave 
McKinney, a ranch hand who shares in the 
responsibility for the care of the camels, said. 
"We move them around the ranch where we 
deem it most advantageous to have them, but 
most of the time, it's by the highway." 

The camels, which are from Australia, 
have adapted easily to life in Kansas, 
McKinney said. 



"They can sustain wide varieties of tem- 
perature variations because of their genetic 
makeup," he said. "They can acclimate very 
well because, where they're from, it could be 
1 20 degrees in the daytime and 30 degrees at 
night." 

How the camels are fed depends on the 
time of year and weather conditions. 

"If it's snowing and blowing, they are fed 
a lot more than in the summer," McKinney 
said. 

Because the camels also eat brush, they 
can serve to control the weed population in 
the pasture, unlike a cow, which mainly eats 
grass. Field said. 

"They take a lot of plants that are undesir- 
able out of the pasture and eat anything in 




Paul Schley, Manhattan, laughs aa Carman Chlrveno. Prairie Village, explains how 
aurprtssd aha waa to see a hard of camels from the highway as shs drove homo from Sallna. 

sight, just like a horse or a cow," Field said. 

Although they may be vaccinated and fed 
the same as cattle, camels carry a consider- 
ably higher price tag. 

The con of the camels depends on their 
age, Keith Myers, ranch-hand supervisor, 
said. 

"The price varies a great deal, but it's usu- 
ally around $4,000 to $7,000 per animal. 



Cattle cost from $800 to $1,200. It's quite a 
difference." Myers said. 

Since the camels are seen as regular live- 
stock by animal care professionals, they are 
not placed in the same category as other exot- 
ic animals for several reasons. 

James Carpenter, head of exotic animal 
wildlife and zoo animal medical service in the 
in the College of Veterinary Medicine, said he 
has no problem with the private ownership of 
a camel. 

"They have been reared and raised in the 
Middle East and since they have been domes- 
ticated, have been of great value there. It's 
certainly not unreasonable to have them here 
for displays and shows," Carpenter said. 
Carpenter said exotic animals such as poi- 
sonous snakes or 
wild cats don't do 
well in captivity 
under an untrained 
person, but camels 
have been domesti- 
cated for so long, 
they don't present 
any problems. 

"If an animal is 
taken out of the 
wild while it is still 
a predator and then 
hand raised, it can 
be potentially dan- 
gerous. When it 
comes to a camel, 
it's a little bit dif- 
ferent because a 
camel can be 
trained and handled 
easily," Carpenter 
said. Field said he 
doesn't consider a 
camel an exotic 
animal. 

"There's no law 
that pertains to a camel or llama;" Field said. 
"If you're raising bobcats and mountain lions, 
then you will need a exotic animal permit to 
have them in possession, but a camel doesn't 
fall under any of those. 

Field said he has seen the camels along the 
highway but doesn't deal with Hudson 
because the camels are under full control of 

■ .see CAMELS Page \2 



8 



Friday, April IS, 1W4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Back 

to 

business 

In the wake of 

the release of the 
general •taction 
results. Student 
Senate met 
Thursday night to 
discuss the 
budget. 



Cofogian 




Candidates nervously await results 



JOHW MKMOWtKY 

Collegian 



T 



he results are 
out, but not as 
soon as expect- 
ed. 



Candidates starting gathering 
at the Student Governing 
Association office at about noon 
Thursday. 

Posters displayed on the SGA 
doors read "Election Results 
available by noon." The clock on 
the wall read 1 2: 1 Op.m. 

"It has been hard on the candi- 
dates having to wait a while 
because we are all nervous," 
Michael Henry, aits and sciences 
senator, said. 




ECTIONS 



'94 







Mark Tomb, freshman in psy- 
chology, and Patrick Carney, 
junior in political science, sal in 
the SGA office waiting for the 
election results. 

Tomb was running for Student 
Senate, and Carney was running 
for Union Governing Board, two 



term, and Student Senate. 

"I didn't sleep well last night," 
Carney said. 

Carney likened waiting for the 
results of the election to waiting 
for the posting of grades. 

"The professor says the grades 
will be ready by a certain time," 
Carney said. "Then you go in, 
and he says the grades aren't 
done, and you're left hanging." 

Tomb said he was frustrated 
because he made three calls 
Wednesday evening and was told 
results would be available soon. 

"I called at 9. They said call 
back after 10. Then, I call at II, 
and they said the results would be 
the next day," Tomb said. "They 
weren't even on time today. If 
they knew they were behind, they 



should have told us. It would 
have been a lot easier." 

Greg Tadtrnan, arts and sci- 
ences senator, sat on the other 
side of the office and waited to 
see if he would be re-elected. 

"I know the election commit- 
tee is doing the best they can. 
They will have the results out 
eventually," Tadimun said. 

"All I know is. it's getting 
crowded in this office." 

The SGA office became 
crowded when candidates heard 
the results would be out at 12:30 
p.m. 

About 25 people filled the 
office and the area outside. 

"We have a winner for the stu- 
dent elections — 18,000 people 
wrote me in," Ed Skoog, student 



body president announced to the 
group. "There will be no need for 
elections next week." 

The final results were posted 
at 1 p.m. 

David Frese. student body 
vice president, said the delay was 
because the SGA purchased a 
computer program to count the 
votes. 

"In the past, we paid $1,000 
out of house for the use of a pro- 
gram," Frese said. "This year, in 
the interest of saving money, we 
bought the program." 

Frese said volunteers also 
counted the votes instead of pro- 
fessionals. 

"The delay was unfortunate, 
but so what," Frese said. 'They 
took their time and got it right" 



Union referendum voted down 



i i 



tout* Form 

Cillcpan 

The K-State 
student body 
voted down 
the Union ref- 
erendum by 1 percent. 

Even though the referendum, 
which would enhance and 
expand the K-State Union, 
received the majority of the 
votes, 1,823 to 1,268, it failed to 
receive the mandatory 60 per- 
cent. 

The referendum would have 
increased fees by $25 per semes- 
ter per student in order to reno- 
vate and build an addition to the 
Union. 



Brent Coverdale, arts and sci- 
ence senator and Union enhance- 
ment committee member, said 
the 60-percent requirement has 
not been in placed for two years. 

He said when Farrell Library 
and the Chester E. Peters 
Recreation Complex were up for 
a vote dealing with their expan- 
sion, the referendums passed on 
a majority basis. 

"It's just annoying that the 
minority won, but those are the 
rules," Coverdale said. "This was 
obviously the best proposal or 
else we wouldn't have brought it 
up. 

"The longer we wait, the more 
expensive it's going to get" 

David Frese. student body 
vice president and committee 
member, said the issue is far 



from dead, and the referendum 
will be voted on by the Kansas 
Board of Regents. 

"The majority of the students 
voted for it," Frese said. "The 
majority of the students realize 
the Union needs to be fixed." 

Frese said regardless of how 
the board votes, the problems are 
not going to go away. 

"I think if the regents don't 
pass it, you'll see a decrease in 
services, especially in food ser- 
vice, including the hiring of stu- 
dents for food-service jobs," 
.Frese said. "We educated the stu- 
dents, not persuaded them. This 
is the most honest project I've 
been involved with since I've 
been in Student Senate." 

Pat Carney, Union Program 
Council member and committee 



member, said significant cutting 
will be needed to find the money 
to fix structural problems. 

"We've got to cut administra- 
tive costs to the bone and try to 
revamp food service so it makes 
money, not loses money." 
Carney said. "Our main concern 
is the upkeep of the Union. 

"Where do we get the money 
to fix the problems with the 
plumbing and the electricity?" 

Trent LeDoux, Union 
Governing Board member and 
committee member, said any way 
the students look at the referen- 
dum issue, something in the 
future will have to pass to pre- 
serve the Union. 

"We'll wait two years when 
Student Senate will mandate to 
renovate," LeDoux said. "It's not 



whether it passes — failure 
means fear. 

"We may be looking at $25 
just to fix the building." 

Students had mixed feelings 
about the failure of the referen- 
dum. 

Wendy Thorp, sophomore in 
elementary education, said the 
referendum was a good thing, 
and it should remain a live issue. 

"1 think it should have 
passed," Thorp said."! don't 
think it should be a dead issue." 

Tim Stevens, senior in geog- 
raphy, said he did not vote for 
the referendum even though he 
understands the Union needs to 
be repaired. 

"I kind of had mixed feel- 
ings," Stevens said. "I felt $25 
was a little too expensive." 



Computers 
justified 
by council 



eeaajsi 

The Fine Arts Council said it was justified in 
its purchases of several computers last year. 

Council members were angry with members 
of the administration and Student Governing 
Association for talking to the Collegian about the 
questionable spending of the fine arts fee to pur- 
chase things like computers. 

Sarah Caldwell, chair of the Student Senate 
finance committee and a member of the council, 
said Senate has restructured the council. 

Capital purchases costing more than S2S0 
have to be approved by the council. 

That was not the case when three computers 
were purchased last year. 

"Everyone felt their hands were tied," 
Caldwell said. "Changes were made, and I think 
they will work." 

She said the biggest concern from students 
was that they didn't want the fee being used to 
support academic departments. 

The heads of the departments said that was 
not the case. 

Richard Martin, director of McCain auditori- 
um, said Senate was part of the problem. 

He said the finance committee did not process 
paperwork quickly enough and alert departments 
when there were problems. 

He said McCain is waiting to be reimbursed 
for $3,000 it spent on a performance in fall. 

Eugene Kremer. head of the architecture 
department, said $10,000 out of $250,000 was 
not a significant amount. 

He said he thought it would be remarkable if 
any business could do as well. 

Kremer said there were vendors that would no 
longer charge to them because money had not 
been approved in a timely manner. 

Council members said TriciaNolfi, director of 
student activities and services, had not spoken in 
a responsible wav when she said the council 
shouldn't be able to keep reserves at year's end. 

Jack Flower, head of the department of music, 
said 10 percent of the student body belong to stu- 
dent music groups and they needed more money, 

"We could use six limes more money, and we 
would use it so fast it would make your head 
spin, " Rower said. 



Senate divided 

CONTTNUfflrFROM PAGE 1 

pening with their allocations. 

"If no allocations bill is passed before the 
end of the term, no student group will get any 
money," Caldwell said. 

Senate rode the fence on the issue, with an 
almost equal division of those for and against 
the center. 

Aaron McKee, engineering senator, said 
the center's funding should remain at $0. He 
said he felt the service was not a necessity. 

"We've already taken a stand as a group," 
McKee said. "We can't let one person micro- 
manage us. We've got to stick to our guns." 

But all the debate is going nowhere, Liz 
Ring, communications chair, said. Ring said 
she thinks the center provides a valuable ser- 
vice to students. 

"It's a service that students hardly pay 
anything for that they can use," Ring said. 
"I'm tired of Senate spending so much time 
on this issue." 



ELIGI 



ST. LUKE 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

(LCMSI 

Lutheran Student Fellowship (LSF) 

Pastor Robert C Schaedel 

Pastor James Gau 

DCE Julie Korte 

Sat, Worship 6 p.m. 

Sun. 8 and 10:45 a.m. 

Bible Class Sunday 9:30 a.m. 

330N.SunselAve. 539-2604 



SpwdtfolfaU 




332- 65 60 



First Congregational Church 

Poynte and Juliette 537-7006 

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. 

Worship 10:45 a.m. 

Wed. Services 6 p. m 

Breakfast 

9:30-10: 15 am. Sun. 

All free, everyone invited. 

2nd 8 4ih Wed. ol the monih 

liniormal dinner at 5:30 p.m. 

No charge 

Rev Donald Longbottom 




Sermon: Finding Your Way 
in the Fog 



SprecuCtfie c WorcC 

in the %g.Cigion (Directory 532-6560 



CTO 



UNIVERSITY 
CHRISTIAN 

2800 Clatlin 

8:30 & 11 a.m. Worship 

9:45 a.m. Sunday School 

6:30 p.m. 

Sun. Eve. Service 

Handicapped Accessible 
776-5440 



St Isidore's 
Catholic Student Center 

Catholic Student Center 

Sunday Masses 

9:30 am, 11am & 5 p.m. 

Saturday 5 p.m. 

Daily Mass 10 p.m. Tues., Wed., Thurs. 

Fri. 4:30 p.m 

Confessions: 3:30 p.m. Sat 

Rev. Keith Weber, Chaplain 

Sister Rose Walters, Campus Minister 




711 Denlson 



539-7496 




VINEYARD 

CHRISTIAN FTLLOWSHIT 

OF MANHATTAN 

Saturday 7 p.m. 

Contemporary Style Worship 

Children's Ministries 

539-0542 
519 Richard Road 

(the oW Showrtw bukSng) 




fyfigwn Oirtctory 

532-6560 



© 



Unitarian-Universal 1st 
Fellowship of Manhattan 



J. 



•MM tM> MM pkp trry. M in* ■ 

ihiMi m («■». «>. am *■* ■ * ■*» 

oe MM* *m i amt wi o«w»-™«w aWm ■ 

SumJ»y ScTwot md SwvkM 10-4R t.m. 
MTCMMTON CALL SJtftMl W OT-SltS. 



First Baptist Church 

American Baptist 

Sunday School 9:45 am 

Praise Singing 10:45 a.m. 

Sunday Worship 11 a.m. 

2121 Blue Hills Rd. 

For rides, call 539-8691 

Prayer & Praise 7 p.m. 

(2nd & 4th Sunday) 

Pastors Alan & Karen Selig 



T FIRST CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 

(Disciples of Christ) 
The Church that cares about You . 

•Fellowship opportunities 

•Mid-week bible study 

•Youth program 

•Nursery provided for all church 
activities 

Sunday Worship 6:30 & 10:55 am. 

Church School (all ages) 9:45 a.m. 

Dr, Donald E. Brezavar, Pastor 



5th & Humboldt 



776-8790 



^A Manhattan Mennonfte 
yo* Fellowship Church 

10th and Fremont. 539-4079 
' HamsH Wartnw, Pastor 

Church School 9:30 a.m. Worship 10:45 am. 



FIRST UNITED 

METHODIST CHURCH 

8:30 a.m. Communion 

(first Sunday of the month) 

9:45 a.m. Church School 

8:30 & 11 am. Worship 

Nursery provided (or all services 

OmerG. Tittle, Pastor 

612 Poynte 776-S821 



KSU Gospel Service 

All Filths Chapel 

Service starts at It am. every Sunday 

For mors information cat 532-3583. 
One Lord. One Fa/th and On* Baptism 



ST. FRANCIS CANTERBURY 
EPISCOPAL CAMPUS MINISTRY 




No services March 20 & 27 

Lutheran Episcopal Services 

Easter Day 7 a.m. 



GRACE BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

Morning Worship 8:30 A 10:45 

Collegiate Bible Study & 

International Bible Study 

Sun. 9:30 am. 

Sunday Evening Fellowship 

or Caring Cells 6 p.m. 

Ministry Night Wed. 7 p.m. 

Students Welcome! 

2901 Dickens 776-0424 




Lutheran 
Campus 
Ministries 

WORSHIP 
Sundays 11 a.m. 
Danforth Chapel 
Holy Communion celebrated 
every Sunday 
+No worship on March 20 
+Palm Sunday 11 a.m. 
♦Episcopal/Lutheran Easter 
Sunrise Service, meet at ECM 
parking lot at 6:45 a.m. 
-i-Special location near town. 
Pastor Jayne Thompson 
539-4451 
—Open to All— 





9 



IVERSIONS 



ACROSS 

1 Mar 17 
honors* 
I"— not 

ChOOM 

to run* 
• Almott 
ustdup 

12 Disgrace 

13 Melody 

14 Spanish 
queen 

15 tend a 
stubborn 
shoelace 

16 Coincides 
16 Hansel 



Grelel's 
trail 

20 Pro 
follower 

21 Jongg 
lead-in 

23 Luau gunk 

24 'Hammer- 
in' Hank* 

25 Guinness 
orWaugh 

27 Squamous 
29 Supporters 

of the 

museum? 
31 Sultan look 

35 Six-Day 
War VIP 

37 Appellation 

36 Ha met 
Sally, in 
a movie 



41 Just out 
43 Monkey 

suit 
44Jal — 

45 Tile an 
47 Snags 

46 Bandlead- 
er Jones 

32 Everything 
the builder 
needs 

53 Inventor 
Whitney 

54 Emulated 
Washing- 
ion? 

55 Ship's 
timber 
curve 

56 Kingston 
Trio hit 
of 1959 

57 Criteria 
DOWN 

1 Georgia, 

Solution time 



once: abbr. 
t Article 
in your 



a hole 

I Arabian 
bigwig 

I Prepare 
to drive 

iLike 
pentam- 
eter, often 

' "Buenos 

■ 

(Scrap 

I 'Merry 



17 



19 



24 



TTeTs I 



26 

26 

30 
32 



composer 

33 
customer 
"There— 34 
old 36 

woman...' 

26 mine. 

39 



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Yesterday"* answer 4-15 



46 

46 

50 

51 



It ha* 

drawing 

power 

Unlike 

rolling 

•tones 

West of 

Hollywood 

Carte 

lead-irt 

The whole 

shootin' 

match 

Actor 

Hardwtcke 

DeMilleor 

Moorehead 

Deposit 

Keep* an 

eye on 

Ostrich's 

oo us in 

King (Let) 

Butterfly 

genus 

Cabbies 

Actor 

Debn 

Wretched 

Locale for 

an obi 

Tuna 

sandwich 

of a sort 

Man is one 

Fashion 

line 

Suitable 

Peaks: 

abbr. 




CRYPTOQUIP 



Eugene Sheffo 



W2H-HYWZHXZM YO XLSSK 
FMK-TDZLQZMJ RJ TLDDZF 
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Yiatli'lf/t Cryptoqulp SAID PURPOSEFUL EMPLOYEE 
AT MACARONI FACTORS 



TORY: TTS ALL SO CUT AND Df 
Today's Cryptoqup Que: W equals G 



WEEKEND ENTERTAINMENT 



FRIDAY — 

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> Brook* awl Ourw - 8 pjri. «! Bnmfage Coisegm 

> lanMnt -9 pm it takers Bar a fin 

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SATURDAY 

► Hay of As WerW* — S pai in Mchoh Thanh* 

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SUNDAY ■ 

> "AMHnear-3pmtoMa^A«db9rtori 



> Pieces ot paper in the 
National Archives - 3 billion 




> Pieces of paper held by 
the federal government - 5.2 

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>■ Accumulated paper 
growth rate— 9.5 miion 
agesayear 



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'Been there offers advice for 'Mistake 



Write to Cassandra, 
116KedzleHall. 
Manhattan, Kan. 

66506. 



Dear Cassandra, 

I am writing in response 
to the letter from "Biggest 
mistake of her life." Her 
situation sounds very much 
identical to events of my 
own past, and I hope she 
will read this 

You need to realize that 
you are not in any way at 
fault or to blame for what 
happened to you. You stat- 
ed that he was 10 years 
older than you, but that 
realty makes no difference 
in this matter. 

You also say that you 
said "NO," but he would 



not stop. If you mean that 
he physically forced him- 
self on you, it was rape. But 
if you mean that you did 
not try hard enough to stop 
him, I'm not sure you could 
legally call it rape — you 
would have to talk to an 
attorney. But it was wrong. 

You feel you may have 
encouraged his actions. 
Probably not. I don't 
believe any woman encour- 
ages forced sex. Perhaps 
you encouraged intimacy, 
but intimacy does not 
always have to mean sex. 

Women should not have 



to go to extremes, as 
Lorena Bobbin did, in order 
to get the point across to a 
man that "NO" means 
"NO." Don't let this eat 
you up. It was not your 
fault, and you are not alone. 

I've been there 

Dear Been there. 

Thanks for the additional 
input. It makes sense, and I 
hope it helps her. I would 
still recommend to 
"Mistake" that counseling 
would make her feel much 
better about the situation. 



Century-old 
play examines 




femininity 




Hentffcsefrsptay'ADol 
HouB6" wM be presented at 3 
p.m. Sunday in McCain 
Aixftorium, Tickets are $12 
to$18forgene^rjubiic,$io 
to$16fcrsentorctosns, 
and $6 lo $9 for students and 
children, Tickets can be pur- 
chased at the McCain to 
Office or by caWng 532-6428. 



CollftfM 

The torment of an obedi- 
ent woman living under 
the control of her hus- 
band is fully recognized in 
Henrik Ibsen's profound play, 
"A Doll House." 

Nora Helmer, the main character of the play, 
is distraught because she has racked up a large 
debt by borrowing 
money to take her 
husband, Torvald, 
to Italy. However, 
she does not wish 
to tell her husband. 

When Nora does 
tell Torvald the 
truth, he responds 
viciously. So, out 
of fear, she leaves 
him and their chil- 
dren and sets out to 
find her true self. 

Finding one's 
true self is a princi- 
pal theme of "A 
Doll House." Ibsen 
wrote the play in 
1879, when it was 
socially unaccept- 
able for a woman to 
have any power or 
control in a marriage. Nora has been trapped in 
her own home. She has merely been a sort of 
doll, only used for the gratification of her hus- 
band. 

Nora was only acting as an extension of 
Torvald' s life. This total eclipse of personality 
drives her away from her family. Nora's femi- 
nine instincts have won over her social instincts. 

Sure, it might be socially Correct to let her 
husband manipulate her, but to her wild, femi- 
nine spirit, it would be death. Nora simply could 
not be herself within her marriage, and she need- 
ed to escape. 

The play is full of falsehoods. Torvald consid- 
ers himself the strong, masculine husband to 
Nora's always-in-need wife. Their marriage is 
nothing but a sham. 

There is, of course, the optimism that because 
Nora has broken free of her horrible marriage, 
she will become successful in life, and that she 
will find truth, goodness and self-realization. 
However, an unmarried woman in the 19th cen- 
tury was considered a social miscast. 

Ibsen was a Norwegian playwright who also 
wrote "Hedda Gabler," 'The Master Builder" 
and "The Wild Duck." "A Doll House," when it 
premiered in 1879, became a great controversy 
in social circles in Europe. 

It was debated with great concern that the 
play ended wrong — Nora shouldn't leave her 
family. Many scholars and authors wrote alterna- 
tive endings or moralistic sequels that either 
made Nora into some selfish monster and the 
doer of great evil, or they would make her return 
to her family and beg their forgiveness. 

The Acting Company, which is presenting "A 
Doll House." was founded in 1972 by Margot 
Harley and the late John Houseman. 

The Company recruits young, gifted actors 
from America and gives them the chance to tour 
and develop their skills in classical repertory. 
The Company prides itself deeply in advertising 
that all of its alumni are in constant demand. 



W«*ll keep your foot o tappliV 




The K-State Sinners 



SpringShow 



'& 



Thursday, April 14 and Saturday, April 16 

McCain Auditorium 8 p.m. 

Tickets available from the McCain Box Office, 532-6428 



Sigma Kappa Cruisin' Jamaica '94 


Taml Brown 


Dave Metzger 


Beth Jungs 


Jamal Dabes 


Collette Mrynek 


Brad House 


Becky Buhrte 


Kevin McCune 


Missy Osborne 


MarkMeCalK' 


^teura Buterbaugh 


Terry Wycoff 


Kim Vance 


Jim Morgan "% 


firtsti mUfrflham 


Brian Vance 


Mary Vohs 
AnneBeackman 


Jfm Wilcox ^m 
JeasaC^afl 




John Burelson 




r Brad Davlsson 


Hetka Combs 


CnK flOOV 


inna Mellree\> 


Brett Robinson 


Karah Levahdp|F 






Tony Hansmann 


Tracy Wajtfflfj 






Jason Johnson 


Jennifer Harrison 




^MrwfMever 


Sieve Collins 


Cheri O'Brien 


Sflane Morrison^ 


(PcWentty 


Brandon Wilson 


Alisha Chapman 


Mike Butler 


ECfersftn Marts 


Dave Wafts 


Rachelle Harkneas Paul Meyer 




Lance White 


Monica Fsverbom 


Brad Houschlld 




Shane Ashton 


AmyZieglar 


Cralton Young 




Larry Keller 


Heather Bradshaw Cnrte Btotherson 


j^nrfcSutjr^ -*. 


Ken Russell 


Marilyn Hetzsl _* 


Torn Edwirds 




minfl RmjfloSO 


Joanna Shoup 


Brady RandsrH 




. Jeff Carlie 


Sarah Po« 




TrinartesT^fc-^ 


Jamas Nagel 
jjyle Lennard 


Charticc Uagnuio 
Tonya Qeffi^ 




Ginger Tillman *~ 


Mark Alley 


eWtsW* 4 " 


"SakeHMI 


CRUSH PARTY DATES 





Kansas State University 

5th Annual Pow-Wow 

APRIL 16, 1994 

Ahearn Fieldhouse 

Denison Ave. & College Heights 

Gourd Dancing begins at 1 p.m. 
Intertribal Dancing begins at 7 p.m. 



Sponsored by 

The Native American Student Body and 

The American Indian Science & Engineering Society, 



e| A WdiK April IB. 199+ 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



RaynorChia, 
junior In mechani- 
cal engineering, 
shows elementary 
school children 
how to use tans 
during the Inter- 
national fair 
Thursday after- 
noon In the Union. 
Chla, a member of 
the Malaysian 
Student 

Association, was 
working his shift 
at the Malaysian 



Collegian 




Fair exposes students to different cultures 



"Today I* a 
k«y day for 
paopla who 



Displays inform; 

students see world 
beyond K-State 



-no kllkt 



hMftent.N 



from our 
home, wo like 
to talk about 

it, and so do 
thoyV 

Donna Davis 

Director of the 

International 
Student Center 



CoHtfian 

Fifteen K-Siate international 
student organizations gathered 
Thursday at the K-State Union for 
the annual International Fair 
Exhibit. 

The fair, part of 1994 Inter- 
national Week, exposed K-State 
students to the traditions of many 
cultures throughout the world. 

"I hope that people realize that 
there is a bigger world out their 
than their own backyard. Everyone 
comes through the Union, and if 
they see all these different coun- 
tries, they might get interested," 
said Patricia Bennett, senior in 
physics and German and represen- 




tative for the KSU International 
Community Service Program. 

"I believe an international expe- 
rience is one of the best things a 
student can do in college," Bennett 
said. "This is a great chance for 
students to see all the opportunities 
that are available." 

Cultures represented at the fair 
included Africa, Bangladesh, 
China, Costa Rica. Europe, 
Indonesia, Iran, Japan, Malaysia, 
Puerto Rico, Pakistan, Thailand, 
Vietnam and Zaire. 

"K-State has changed so much 
over the years. Everyone is much 



more accepting to international 
ideas and cultures," Anolahd de 
Leon, senior in political science 
and French, said. 

"The fair really opens up the 
mentality of K-State students 
because it shows them there's a 
whole world outside of K-State," 
de Leon said. 

This was the first year the fair 
also featured exhibits from K-State 
offices and departments, as well as 
Manhattan area businesses. 

But Donna Davis, director of the 
International Student Center, said 
she believes the fair should concen- 
trate on students' education about 
the world they live in. 

"The common excuse that many 
K-State students have is they don't 
have the opportunity to meet inter- 
national students while on cam- 
pus," she said. "They say "I don't 
know where to go or what I'd say.' 



We've made it as easy as possible. 

"The fair is a very important 
part of International Week because 
it's a tradition. The other activities 
let students watch them but there is 
no opportunity for interaction," 
Davis said. 

'Today is a key day for people 
who have been hesitant," she said. 
"If we're away from our home, we 
like to talk about it, and so do 
they." 

Bilal Akber, sophomore in busi- 
ness and member of the Pakistan 
Students Association, said the 
exhibits give students better access 
to other worldly cultures. 

"Most people, after coming to 
our booth, ask more about our 
country. The embroidery and jew- 
elry attract them and make them 
want to learn more about what our 
country is about," Akber said. 



Minority loan 
default passes, 
goes to Clinton 

WASHINGTON — The House approved and 
sent to the president Wednesday a bill that 
extends an exemption for historically black col- 
leges from current laws on student loan defaults. 

The House, by a 283- 1 36 vote, also extended 
the exemption for tribal I y-control led community 
colleges. 

In 1 992, Congress mandated thai any institute 
of higher learning with a default rate of 25 per- 
cent or higher over a three-year period would 
lose its eligibility to participate in the federal stu- 
dent loan program. 

However, citing the special mission of histori- 
cally black colleges and universities, it gave 
them an exemption allowing them to receive fed- 
eral funds despite high default rates. 

The bill extends the exemption, which was to 
have expired on July I, 1 994, through July I, 
1998. 

The Senate passed the bill by voice vote last 
month. President Clinton has indicated his sup- 
port. 

Lafene fee cut 
discussed 
by Regents 



Colk(l*n 

The Kansas Board of Regents discussed fee 
decreases Thursday at K-State. 

This month, the board conducted its regular 
monthly meeting on campus. 

K-State plans to decrease the student health 
fee from $80 to $70. 

This reduction in fees, which the Student 
Senate has approved, would be supplemented by 
what was called by one K-State administrator "a 
sizable reserve." 

He said this reserve would probably be deplet- 
ed by fiscal year 1996 or 1997. 

The Board also discussed the proposed 
increase in the fine arts fee at K-State. 

The fee would increase from $7.40 to $8.40 in 
order to fund other groups funded by the student 
activity fee. The Student Senate has already 
approved this increase, which is projected to 
bring in an additional $20,000 per semester. 

A discussion of the Union enhancement fee 
ended quickly because results of the student ref- 
erendum for the proposed $25 fee held Tuesday 
and Wednesday were not yet known. 

■ See K-STATE Page 12 




LASSIFIEDS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



OUR BASIC RATI 

To run 20 *rert* or lee* tor one day 
I* «. for Nth word ow 20 add 20c 
ptr «Md Csi $334585 tor constcutlvt 



DEADLINES 

Clettrhed wli mutt be placed by 
noon the dty before the dale the ad 
runs. Clatsifed display ads must be 
placed by 4 p.m. two working days 
before the date the ad run*. 



HOW TO PAY 

All etataif ledt mutt be paid in 
advance unless you have an 
established account with Student 
Publications, Cash, check, MasterCard 
or Vita art accepted. 



Call 532-6555 
to place your classified. 



000 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 



0101 



■HOWARD STERNS' need- 
ed tor co hosts or pro- 
duction itaff positions 
tor the talk- radio »how 
*A Purple Affair.* Appli 
cationa available at the 
SGA Office or D892 itu 
dios (McCain 3171 

ACCC AO ALUMNI RE- 
UNION. Set. April 
IS, 2:10p.m. Col- 
lege Farm. For more 
Information contact 
Terry Poweleon or Bee 
Nilges (3101365 5116 

ADVANCED RIGHT Train- 
ing. Multiongine pri- 
vate, commercial, or 
ATP In Turin Comanche 
with HSI, RMI, OPS. 
Storm Scope. Hugh Ir- 
vin. 539-31 28 



AUOHI VIDEO GAMES 
Buy- seli- Irede. Ninten- 
do- Sega- all systems. 
Game Guy 637-0989 

700 N, 12th, Aggieville. 

COME FLY with ua. K -Stale 
Flying Club haa four alr- 
planee. For beat pricea 
call Sam Knlpp, 539 

6193 after 5; 30pm. 

DON T LOSE track of 
fi lenita thle summer! 

Buy a Campus Dlrec 
lory today Available in 
103 Kedlle. 12 with 
ttudent 10, S3 25 with 
faculty/ ateff ID, $4 oth- 
er*. CemcHie Office*: 
pleete purchese from 
KSU Office Suppllee at 
the Union Bookstore. 



0201 



Leaf, and Found 



Found idi can be 
placed free far three 
days. 

FOUND: SET of keya on 
•idewalk al 14th and 
Felrchlld. 539 6062 

owl 



Parsonals 



Mfa require a farm af 
picture ID (KSU, drlv 
ar'a license ar other) 
whan piecing a per 



jody B.-WE wanted to 
with you * Happy 21*1 
Blrthdeyl Have a great 
dayl Carrie, Suiv, Mill- 
er, Kale, Toia, Gi Gl, 
Chi, Wendy, Jill. 

PIKES- CONGRATULA- 
TIONS on winning Lip 
Sync. It** iu«t a teste of 
what'* left to come- 
Homecoming '94! Love, 
flaquel, Jennifer, Joan- 
na. 

OH] 



Pa rtlaa-n- Mora 



CREATE HOT wet memo- 
riea with your nexl par- 
ty. Wet-N-Wild Mobile 
Hot Tub Rent a It. Year 
round availability 537 
1826 



For Rent- 
Apts. Furalahad 

APARTMENTS, MOBILE 
Hornet, lurnlihed, un- 
furnished, quiet »ur- 
roundlngt for ttudy, 10 
or 11-month leatet, 
June or Aug. No pen 
537-8309 



AUGUST LEASE- next to 
camput, acrots Marian 
and Goodnow Hell 
11832 Cleflin) one/ 
two-bedroom. 
539-2702 evening*/ 
message 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1. Large 
two-bedroom apart- 
ment. $400 519 Osage 
water/ trash paid, di*n 
wathar, garbage dispo- 
sal, low utilities. 
776-2393 

AVAILABLE NOW, sum 
mer end fall, Very nice 
two, three and 
four-bedroom apart- 
men! complexes and 
house*. Near campus 
with greet prices. 
537-1666, 537-2919. 

FOR AUG. Next to KSU. De- 
luxe two-bedroom 

apartment. $485 Pay 
only electric. 539-2482. 
after 4p.m. 

FOR RENT, Iwo room*, 
non-*rnoking, partly 
furnished, trash paid. 
one-fourth utilities 
Clote (o camput. call 
537-0704. 

LARGE TWO end 

three- bad room apart 
menf* clote to camput. 
Aggieville end City 
Park Available June 1 
539-1713. 

NEAR KSU lummer lease 
only. Nice two-bed- 
room basement apart 
mem. 1300. 539-2482. 
after 4p.m 

ONE-BEDROOM STUDIO 
in complex, 1219 Claflin 
next to camput. $310 

plus electric, plus de 
potit. Aug. year lease, 
no pett, 537-1 180. 

TWO, THREE end 

fou r-bed room .Very 
good condition. Wind- 
ow air, get heal end 
carpeted. Available in 
June. 937-7334. 

TWO STORY duplex with 
patio. One end one-half 
block* eatt of Ford Hall. 
two full bathroom*, 
four off-*treet parking 
atallt. 1401 McCain 



S600 per month. 
539-7693 

TWO-BEDROOM. LUXURI 

OUS apartments nter 
campus and opposite 
city park at 1200 Fre- 
mont for June or Au- 
gust. Cerpeted, central 
air, dishwasher and dit- 
poaal. No pelt. $485. 
5310428 

WALK TO camput. 1734 
Laramie, two-bedroom, 
stove and refrigerator 
furnithed. Heat, water 
and trash paid. No pets. 
$500/ month. June 1, 
one year least 1 642- 
5354. 


AVAILABLE MAY 1, 
one-bedroom. 102' 
Laramie $325 including 
all utilities, one-year 
lease, no pats. Also one 
and two-bedroom for 
Aug. the Housing Co 
539-2255 

AVAILABLE NOW, 
one-bedroom. 1023 
Suntet. $345 Water/ 
traah paid. Close to 
campus. 776-3004. 

AVAILABLE NOW, sum 
mer and fall. Very nics 
two, three end 
four-bedroom apart 
ment complexet and 
houte*. Near camput 
with greet pricea. 
537-1666, 537-2919. 


1 


i flf\ 


1 w 


ROYAL 
TOWERS 

Apartments 
1700 N.Manhattan 

Now Leasing 
far June Si August 


HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 


"OaBBajBBBBBJBBBJ 
For Rant- 
Apt. 
Unfumlshad 

014 THURSTON tludlo wa- 
ter/ treth paid. No pett/ 
smokers. June 1 lease, 
$270. Call 539-5136. 

AVAILABLE IMME- 
DIATELY, nice two bed 
room, 617 N. 12th, 
$575, water, trash paid. 
Close to campus. 776- 
3804. 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1. 
One-bedroom $340, 
two-bedroom $510 

1866 College Height*. 
Water/ traah paid. Clote 
to camput. 776-3004. 

litMitriiiMisiiiliTnB 

•Quality 2 Bedrooms' 

1212 Biuemont $500 

1 106 Biuemont $500 

907 Vaiticr $490 


1 bedroom and 
4 bedroom / 2 bath 

$395 ami $860 


Refrigerator 
w/ Ice-maker, range, 

microwave & 

dishwasher. 

Resident Center with 

hot tube, deck »nd 

JaundromaL 
MODEL SHOWINGS: 
NoAppolnlmrnti Taktn 


TWwSaytMl nm. 

Thunder 24 p.m. 

Satsintan* J 0- J 1 turn. 

fe> to IMA Mil 
eatMstfcstdeoftttatMdS. 

gj Managed by 

. . B MeCuttoufK 

ltWtopm.ni 


* 


_*«* K4tl 1 | 



AUGVST LEASES 

fmH \fU. *StnlMBr IffeV 

•<.Mrr rlripkH 

I -»rpc 2 Ki-,lr<„,m I) nils 

537-9064 

Wn-ktlaya V i-m.-4:3fl p.ei. 



AVAILABLE NOW. 

three-bedroom, clote 
to City Perk. 300 N. 

tlth. $435 Upstairs 
unit. Water/ treth paid. 
776-3804. 

AVAILABLE NOW, 

two-badroom by City 
Park. 1026 Osage. $495 
Water/ traah paid. 
776-3804. 

AVAILABLE NOW. Spa- 
cious two-bedroom. 
Clote to campus 1829 
College Heights $680 
Water/ traah paid. 
776-3804. 

CHASf MANHATTAN 
APARTMENTS OFF 
ESI YOU ALL THE 
COMFORTS Of NEW; 

modern Interiors, dish 
washers, mlcrowavaa. 
clubhouse with swim- 
ming. pool, tun deck, 
laundry, lounge, and 
workout facilitiae in- 
cluding iteirmaiter*. 
exercise bikes, weight*, 
and TVI Occupancy 
nearlnq 100 percent 
Don't mis* out I Call to- 
day! 776-3663. 

JUNE AND Aug. availabili- 
ty. One, two and 
four-bedroom 1017- 
1029 McCollum $365- 
$800. Close to campus 
770-3804. 

LARGE TWO- three-bed- 
room epertment 10 
minute we Ik from Sea- 
ton Hell. With waahar/ 
dryer 220 eir condition, 
$550/ month. Call 
537-7142 Ipata a 
maybe I. 

NOW LEASING for Aug. 
1001 Bluamont $780 
Very largo two-bad- 
room, two beth. Nice 
unit*. Clote to Ag- 
gieville. 776-3804 




PARKING 

OF THE 



OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 8 a.m.-5 p.m. (except holidays! 



1 aafJi luujuuui MMtmtk * tas **$* l»Hi M im, 



ONE AND two-badroom 
apartments convenient 
to campus available 
June 1 and Aug. 1. 
$390- $450 References 
requested, no imoking 
or pat* plea**. Bortt 
Restoration 776-1460. 

ONE-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE April 15. 1222 
Loremie $325. All utili- 
ties paid. Cloee to cam 
pus. 776-3804 

ONE-BEDROOM BASE- 
MENT apartment. 820 
Osage $210. Available 
April IS. Water/ traah 
paid 776-3804 

OVERLOOK CAMPUS, two- 
bedroom , dishwasher, 
fireplace, laundry facili- 
ty. Available Aug. 1. 
$510 537 2266, 

PARK PLACE APART- 
MENTS. Now pre- lea* 
ing one, two and 

th ree-bedroomt, 
539-2961. 

TWO-BEOROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE in June. 1120 Fre- 
mont $610. Troth paid. 
Dithweaher. garbage 
disposal, laundry lee Mi - 
ties on-aite. Cloee to 
City Park and Ag- 
gieville. 776-^3804. 

TWO-8EOROOM UNFUR- 
NISHED, two block* 
east of campus. Avail- 
able June 1. 1994. One 
year leete. $350/ 
month. $30-2116. 

TWO-BE 0ROOM, CLOSE 
to campus Available 
Aug. 1, no pet*. 
530-2561 




Studio $220 up 

1 Bedroom $290 up 

2 Bedrooms $330 up 

3 Bedrooms $480 



539-8401 



TWO THREE-BEDROOMS 
one and one- ha If bath, 
central air, laundry, 

near campus, available 
Juna or Aug. 537-8800 

TWO. TWO- bedroom 
apartmente. $585 par 



Rrittnay 
Ridgt^ 

Town Hoi 




Now Leasing 

For June ft August 

* Compare* 

-Very Mica" 1500 tq 

ft, 4 bedroom, 2/> 

bath town homes. 

Refrigerator, range, 

mkitMvava, 

cti t tw wh er. 

BBQ gazebo*, end 

tend volleyball court, 

*Fuii-size* 

washer/dryer 

in each unit. 

For only 

i860 mo. 



MODEL 
SHOWINGS,* 

No Appoititmtnti Taktn 



tfS jtat, 



I 

Gate 




month. One month de- 
posit includes traah and 
lawn cara. Waahar and 
dryer hook- up*, ap 
pliancet. central air and 
heat, two full baths 
Leases begin May 1 or 
Juno 30 Call 539-6000 

VERY NICE four-bedroom 
houee available May 1. 
1817 College Height*. 
$1200 AH utilitiea paid. 
Close to campu*. 
776-3804. 

VERV NICE. Next to com- 

fiua. One, two, three, 
our-bedroom houses 
end epertment* with 
weiher/ dryer central 
air $335- $900 537-0543 



Available 



FOR RENT: one or 
two- bed room t of a 
home. Close to cam- 
put. Rent $138. Laun- 
dry. June 1 laaee. Call 
Sara or Kelly et 
776-0740 



NON-DRINKING AND 
smoking, for two and 
three-bedroom place* 
No pet*. Reference*. 
539-1664. 



lit 

Par 



OUIT PAYING NSNTI 

Nice older home cur- 
rently duplex. Three 

bedrooms plus and stu- 
dio With HW/ solar 
Converts to taiga home 
Or Stay at I* and IAJM 
RINT. Cloee (o park, 
downtown and KSU. 
Students lake this to 
your parenta. 1-800 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, April IS, 1—4 A A 



Collegian Classifieds 



593 0519. After 7pm 
Pried In the 50 a, 



14X70 THREE-BEDROOM 
Mobil* Ho ma, one-half 
■ere fenced tor horses. 
Furnished/ unfurnished 
available June 1 
537-7901 



11 



1892 CHAMPtON Mobil* 
Horns, Ihrea-bedroom, 
two bath, central hail 
and air, deck, storage 
•had, eppilsncea, 
off -street parking, ap- 
proximately 1315/ 
month, located in Colo- 
nial Garden.. 776-3433 

COUNTRYSIDE BROKER- 
AGE twill aell your mo- 
bile home for you. We 
heve fantastic reaulla. 
We do our own flnanc 
ing. Call 539-2325 

TIRED Of paying rent? Buy 
my 70X12. two-bed- 
room, 1967 Skyline Mo- 
bile Home for only 
S4000, call 530-2228. 

1411 



Roommate) 



i 



FEMALE ROOMMATE for 
lummer needed to 
■hare fully (urniahtd 
two-bedroom apart 

ment. $250/ month. Wa- 
ter/ trash paid. No pets. 
770-9859 Heather. 

MALE ROOMMATES 

needed to help share a 
three-bedroom house. 
539-3726. 

MALE ROOMMATE need- 
ed tor summer Own 
bedroom, Nice I Next to 
campus. $1,50 plus utili- 
ties. Cell Dave at 
567-0726. 

NEED FEMALES to share o 
cummer sublease on e 
three-bedroom span- 
ment. Furnished, water/ 
tresh paid. Very close 
to campus. Cell 
776-2266. 

NON-SMOKING FEMALE 
roommate wented to 
share very nice two- 
bedroom apartment 
with Architecture major 
student, starting In 
June or Aug own 
room, washer/ dryer. 
$220 a month plua one- 
half utilities. Call 539 
1874 or leave message. 

NON-SMOKING ROOM- 
MATE needed. Base- 
ment in a house. Own 
room. Free cable $100 
plua half utilities. Call 
539 7067 

NON-SMOKING ROOM- 
MATE lo share house. 
Own room, own bsth, 
own living room, wash 
•r, dryer, central air, 
yard. Mac, 778-8713. 

ROOMMATE NEEDED to 

share five-bedroom 
house. (150 per month 
plus one-fifth utilities. 
Clot* to csmpus. Cell 
537-1621 

ROOMMATE WANTED: 
msle or female. Share 
three-bedroom, pool- 
aid* apartment wiih 
two male roommatea. 
Fall 94- spring 95. $210/ 
month plus one-third 
utilities. Non-smoker 
Cell Brian 532-5184 or 
Mike 532-5492. 

WANTED NON-SMOKING 
and non-drinking mala 
for basement furnished 
private bedroom. Walk 
to KSU 1150 Share 
utilities. 539-1554. 

WANTED: ROOMMATE to 
share a two room apart- 
ment In Crettwood 
Apartments. $220 s 
month. Very new and 
very nice. On top of 
Stagg Hill. Cell 539 
937. ask for David. 



1M| 



, 






1004 MCCQLLUM St., Sum- 
mer sublease, two targe 
bedrooms. One block 
from Durland Hall. S550 
plus utilities. Call 587 
4669, leave massage. 

1828 COLLEGE Height*. 
Summer subleass 
two-bedroom, fully fur- 
nished, dishwasher, 
central air. Up to four 
people. Rant negoti- 
able. Call 539-6895 

ACROSS FROM Ahaern. 

Available Isle 

May- July 31. Nice. 
one-bedroom, dish 
waaher, water/ trash 
psid, S3B0 negotiable 
776-4095 

AVAILABLE M1D-MAY- 
Aug. Sublease one 
room in four-bedroom 
apartment. Pay only 
June and July 5200/ 
month plus one-fourth 
ut III lies Nice, close to 
campus Call 538-2611. 

AVAILABLE M ID-MA Y- 
Aug. Sublease re need 
ad for two-bedroom 
apartment. Close to 
campus/ Agg lev i He Fur 
nished with washer and 
dryer. Rent negotiable. 
776-4039 

AVAILABLE MID MAY 

through lete August 
One-half block from 
campus, Hunting Ave- 
nue partially furnished, 
washer, dryer, one-half 
utilities, rent negoti 
able. 776-4021. 



Mid-May- Aug. Mod 
ern. Right by campus 
Negotiable 538-2138. 

CHEAPI FEMALE needed 
for summer 1120 par 
month, one-third utlll- 
II ea. Your own room, 
one block from cam- 
pus. 537-3645. 



CHEAP RENT for summer 
sublease. Very nice 
apartment. One block 
from campus. Only 
$130 a month. Needed 
either May or June 
until Aug, 1. Female 
roommate preferred. 
Call 776-1495. Ask for 
■Mi 

DESPERATELY NEED fe- 
male to sublease Wood- 
way, four-bedroom. 
Half pricel $100/ 
month. New pool. Avail- 
able May IS. Laurie. 
587-0598. 

DESPERATELY SEEKING 
summer molesters for 
twd-bedroom apart- 
ment Close to campus 
and Aggieville. No rea- 
son able offer refused I 
537-3531. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed. Mid-May to 
July 31. May rant psid. 
Wood way Apartments. 
$190 plus one-fourth 
utilities. Call Ann 
537-1489 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 

needed Available 
mid-May to July 31, 
May rent It paid Wood- 
way Apartments $150 
plua one-third utilities. 
Call Michelle 778-7151. 

FEMALES NEEDED for 
three-bedroom. Water, 
trash paid. $150/ month 
plua one-third utilities. 
Off-street parking. 
Close to campus. 
539-3091 

FOR SUMMER tubleese, 
two-bedroom apart 
ment. One block from 
campus. Will negotiate 
price. 537-4739. 

FOUR-BEDROOM/ TWO 
baths. Apartment near 
Aggieville and campus. 
Very nice and modern. 
Rent negotiable. Cell 
Lori 539-4530. 

HOT DAMN1 Wanting to 

live In luxury over the 
summer end not hsve 
to pay tor it? Curiouc 
about Chase Manhat- 
tan Apartments? We've 
the answer for you. 
'ool. sundeck, basket 
ball, lounge, weight 
room, hug* rooms, 
laundry, private balco- 
ny for parties- excited 
yet? Three- four-bed- 
room*. Cell quick and 
snap 'erupt I 539-1261. 

HOT DAYS, need new 
pool. Wa need summer 
sublessees) for 

three-bedroom at 
Woodway, turnllure/ 
rent negotiable, Call 
532-2126 or 532-2375. 

JUNE AND July sublease 
Nice, clean two-bed- 
room, one bath. Wash 
•r/ dryer. Close to cam- 
pus. Call 776-31*4. 

MALE ROOMMATE need- 
ed- aummer- own 

room, furnished or not- 
pool, spacious, air con- 
ditioned. Available May 
12> $180/ month. Cell 
587-0631. 

MALE/ FEMALE roommate 
needed lor summer 
with option for longer. 
Free washer/ dryer. 
Close to Aggieville. 
Walk to campus. $204 
plus one-fourth utili- 
ties. 776-4148 leave 
for Chris. 



BBeMaBBSaaeSE 



got t 
Pool 



MALE/ FEMALE sublesset 
mid-May- Aug. Own 
bathroom, utilities 
paid, except one-half 
KPL and phone. Mey 
rent free $150/ month 
537 3089, Steve 

NICE TWO-BEDROOM. 

summer sublease. Pool, 
washer/ dryer. 

Rent $450 but very ne- 
gotiable. Mey rent paid. 
778-7843. 

NICE TWO-BEDROOM, 
1326 N. Manhattan, 
May or Juna until July 
31. No pet*. $528. 776- 

NON-SMOKING FEMALE 
10 sublease mid May to 
Aug. Two-bedroom 
$210 plus one-hslf utili- 
ties two blocks from 
campus 539-4256, 

ONE-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT. Availeble-from 
May 1- July 31. Rent is 
$300. One block from 
campua. Please call 
587-0117 after 5p.m. 

ONE BEDROOM basemenl 
apartment available 
mid May through mid 
August. Rent $200. 
Washer, dryer, air con- 
ditioner, pertly fur- 
niahad. Close to cam- 
pus across from Ford 
Hall. Call evenings at 
7764)835, 

ONE-BEDROOM SUB 
LEASE June and July at 
Park Placa $330 a 
month. Two pools. Can 
renew lease Call Mike 
at 539-3556 

ONE BEDROOM. June- 
Jury, $t85/hvonth nego- 
tiable. Call 539-3683. 
aak for Bob 

ONE-BEDROOM. LOW 

rent, one-third utilitiee, 
with pool. From May 
to Aug 776-0665, J*- 



ONE BLOCK from campua. 
Furnished. Dishwasher 
washer/ dryer. Own 
room Mey 12 to July 
31. No pats. 775-9B58. 
Heather. 

OWN ROOM in two-bed 
room. Pets OK May 1- 
Jufy 31. $192.50 rent ne 
gotieble 537-2290. 

OWN ROOM in two-bed- 
room spartmant, two 
pools, wsshers and dry- 
ers. $141.87, plus one- 
third utilities 537 4030 
or 637 9087 ask for Jan 



SPACIOUS TWO- BED- 
ROOM apartment. 

Large matter bedroom. 
Across from campus, 
near Aggieville. $480 
per month. 5374104. 

SUBLEASE ONE-BED- 
ROOM of two-bed- 
room apartment In 
quiet building Avail- 
able now- July 31. All 
utilities paid, except 
electric, central sir, cats 
allowed Call 539-8608. 



SUBLEASE SPACIOUS 
two-bedroom apart- 
ment, end of May 
through July. Fur- 
nished, three blocks 
from campus. Rent ne- 
gotiable. If interested 
cell 537-3686. 

SUBLEASE, FEMALE 

roommate wanted, 
own room, can be fur- 
nished. $175/ month 
plus half utilities, close 
to 'villa and campus. 
Non-amoker wanted. 
776-1301, leave me»- 



SUBLEASE, THREE-BED 
ROOM In Woodway for 
Juns and July. Now 
pool. $450 * month or 
Best Offer. 776-6662. 

SUBLEASE: SPACIOUS 
three-bedroom one 
and one-half bath. 
Great aummer location. 
Juna and July. Nego- 
tiable. Call 537-3981. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 

larga, two-bedroom 
apartment . two blocks 
from campus, one and 
one-half blocks from 
Aggieville; rent negoti 
able; call 776-3483 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 
roommat* needed, 
own room $200/ month 
plus utilities, wssher/ 
dryer, close to campus 
and Vat Mad 537-1581 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 

Spacious two-bedroom 
apartment. 

Non-smokers only. 
539-4909. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- Stu- 
dio apartment right 
next to campus. Fur- 
nished, water and trash 
paid. Available May 15- 
Aug I. $300. 539-8203 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- to 

share three-bedroom 
apartment $200/ 

month and one-third 
utilities. Call Taleyna 
537-2538. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE from 
mid-May- July 31 
Clot* to campua and 
Aggieville, rent negoti 
able. 587-0893. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE In 
Royal Towers to share 
furnished four-bed- 
room apartment May 
Aug Price negotiable. 
Cal'539-6814. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 

one-bedroom. Fur- 
nished or unfurnished 

Utilities paid. $250/ 
month. N*ar campua. 
Call 776-0596. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, 

nice, negotiable, 

two-bedroom, two 
bath, very dote to Ag- 
gieville. Mid-May- July 
31 Call 539-4123. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE. 

one-bedroom In a 
three-bedroom apart- 
ment. Close to Ag 
gieville. Quiet neighbor- 
hood $195/ month plus 
utilities. Call Susan st 
637-9376. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE. 

one-bedroom. $240/ 
month across from 
Ahearn Natatorium 
776-6278. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE. 

roommate to share two 
bedroom apartment 
close to campus, 539- 



SUMMER SUBLEASE, spa- 
clou*, three-bedroom 
apartment Two block* 
from campus. Available 
mid-Mey Price negoti 
able. Call 537-8074 and 
leave message 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, two- 
bedroom partially fur- 
nished, close to campus 
and Aggieville. June/ 
July $315/ month, utili- 
ties and deposit, 539 
9123. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE: Two 
-bedroom apartment 

available mid-May until 
July 31. Water and 
trash paid. Rent negoti 
able 539-8597. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE: very 
nice three-bedroom 
apartment one block 
from campua and one 
block from Aggieville 
Available mid-May 
through August. Very 
reasonable rent. 537- 
3672. 

THREE-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT tor summsr, 
clot* to campus, wash- 
ar and dryer, lota of 
room, price negotiable 
call 539-2654. 

THREE-BEDROOM SUB- 
LEASE $175 per room. 
June 1 to Aug. 1 Call 
532-2881 

TOWNHOUSE SUMMER 
sublease option to rent. 
Flve-bedroomi. 2,5 
bathrooms, washer/ 
dryer. Available on or 
after May 1. $166/ 
month/ person. 

537-3027 

TWO-BEDROOM APART 

MENT, one block from 
campua. Available 
mid-May to July 31. 
$165 a month May rem 
paid. Call 537-1734 

TWO-BEDROOM HOUSE. 
Available mid-May to 
July 31, Option for 
1994- 95 school year 
No pets 539-3497 

TWO-BEDROOM, FUR- 
NISHED, on* block 
from campus. Air con- 
ditioner, dishwasher. 
All utilities paid. Rent 
negotiable. Call/leave 
message, 776-3036. 




WOOOWAY- ONE-BED- 
ROOM AVAILABLE 
May 1- July 31. Call 
637-3862. 



20© 



SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



T y>''»a 



DATA SHEETS, term pa- 
pers, dissertations. 
Laser printer Fast, ac- 
curate service. 12 years 
experience. Mrs. Bur- 
den, 639-1204. 

RESUME RESUME RE 
IUME and all your 
other word processing 
need*. Later printing. 
Call Brtnde, 776-3290. 

WORD PROCESSING done 
in my home- Papers, 
resumes, letters, re- 
ports, the***, ate. Con- 
tact Carol anytime st 
776-439B. 

WOflDPROCESSING SUP- 
PORT for your acade- 
mic and professions! 
needs Papers, 

resumes, letters, re- 
ports. Contact Peggie 
(evenings) at 539-1 191 



Automotive) 
ttapalr 



NISSAN- 0ATSUN Repair 
Service. 22 year* ex 
perience. Mazdas, Hon- 
das and Toyotas elso. 
Auto Craft, 2612 Dipper 
Lane. Manhattan, Kan- 
sas. 537-5049. 8a. m - 
5p.m. Mon.- Frl. 



Sonrico* 



INTERNATIONAL STUD- 
ENTS; OV-1 Greancard 
Program. Sponsored 
by U.S. Immigration. 
Graencarda provide 
U.S. permanent resi- 
dent statue. Citirens of 
almost all countries are 
allowed. For informa- 
tion and forms: New 
Er* Legal Service*, 
20231 Stagg St.. Cano 
ga Park. CA 91306 Tel: 
fB IB) 772-7 168, 
1818)998-4425. Mon.- 
Sun.: 10a.m.- 11p.m. 

PROMPT CONTRACEPTIVE 
and abortion services. 
Dele L. Clinton, M.D.. 
Lawrence, 
1913)841-5716. 



HEALTH AMD Auto cov- 
erage Call u* before 
purchasing The Uni 
varsity Health Plan. Tim 
L. Engla Agency 3528 
Kimball Ave. (.Candle 
wood Shopping Cen- 
ter) 537-4881 KSU 



grtd 1988 




EMPLOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 



Hrtp W*Mit*Hl 



Thai Collegian eannot 
verify the financial po- 
tential of advertise 
ments In the Employ- 
ment/Career classifica- 
tion. Reader* ar* ad- 
vised to approach any 
euch employment op- 
portunity with reaaon- 
abla c; 'itlon The Col- 
legian urges our read 
er* to contact the Bet- 
ter Business Bureau. 
• 01 BE Jefferson. To 
pake, KB 66807 1190. 
1913)2 32 -0464. 
AEROBICS- EARN money, 
while you exercise. In- 
structor (raining 
couraa- April 23 end 
30, 1994 (816,561 6933 

ALASKA SUMMER EM- 
PLOYMENT- fisher 
I**. Many earn $2000 
plus/ month in earner 
lea or $3000- $6000 
plua/ month on fishing 
vessels. For informa- 
tion calf: (2061545-4155 
a XI A576B 

ARGANBRIGHT HAR- 
VESTING. Wanted, 
clean cut person tar 94 
harvest run. Best equip- 
ment and pay mid- May 
through mid-Aug. 
Thed, 1-363-2737. 

ATTENTION GREEKS: 126- 

ye*r- old firm has 20 
spots available for sum- 
mer work Make excel- 
lent career contacts for 
future job searches, 
over $1,500 per month, 
real world experience. 
For information call 1- 
800-640-2840 

ATTENTION: STUDENTS. 
Full-time summer em- 
ployment, 40- 60 hour* 
per weak. Mutt be IB 
years and have two 
ID'S (driver's, S.S. Or 
Stat* I.D.I. Driver*, 
packers, and helper* 
needed. Apply In per- 
son, Coleman Ameri- 
can Moving Service* 
-815 S. 11th in Manhat- 
tan. 

CAMP> COUNSELOR* 

wented for private 
Michigan boys/ girls 
summer camp*. Teach: 
Swimming, canoeing. 
, tailing, watertkilng, 
gymnastjci, riflery, 
archery, tennia, golf, 
tports, computers, 
camping, crafts, 

dramatics, or riding. 



Alao kitchen, office. 
maintenance. Salary 
$1150 or more plua 
R&B. Camp LWC/GWC, 
1766 Maple. Northneld. 
IL 80083. 1708)446-2444. 

COMPUTER NETWORK 
Administrator Assis- 
tant: pert-time stud- 
ent position, mostly 
regularly scheduled 
hour* with limited 
emergency trou- 

bleshooting hour*. Ass- 
ists In overseeing 
55-computer Macin- 
tosh network, including 
troubleshooting, hard 
' ware maintenance, soft- 
ware backup*, and 
record! maintenance. 
Should be familiar with 
Macintosh operating 
systems 6 and 7 end 
have good general 
- knowledge of Macin- 
tosh software. Network 
experience with local- 
talk and ethernat pre- 
ferred. Basic hardware 
and software trou- 
bleshooting skills need- 
ed- Minimum wage. Po- 
sition to Start early Au 
gust. Pick up applica- 
tion el 113 Kediie. Ap- 
plication deadline ie 
3p.m. on Frl., April 
18, IBM. 

CRUISE LINE entry level on 

board and lendaida po- 
sition t avti labia. Sum- 
mer or year round, 
great benefit*, free trav- 
el. (813)229-5478 (Flori- 
da). 

CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIR- 
ING- Earn up to $2,000 
plus/ month working on 
Cruise Ships or Land- 
Tour companies. World 
travel. Summer and 
Full-time employmeni 
available No experi- 
ence necessary. For 
more information call 1- 
206-634-0468 ext C5768. 

OE LIVERY DRIVERS want 
ad for the KC Metro 
Area. Put your vehicle 
to work for you. Full- 
time day*, great sum- 
mer iota. Call Quick De- 
livery (913)8884627. 

EARN OVER $100/ hour 
processing our mail at 
home. For information. 
Call (202)310-5958. 

ENERGETIC. WELL organ 
I tad individual needed 
to provide leadership to 
meet housing need* of 
older Kansans in 
IB county region. Re- 
sponsibilities include 
budget end program 
administration, com- 
munity davelopmant 
planning, resource de 
velopment and person- 
nel management Posi- 
tion is based in Manhat- 
tan and requires day- 
time travel Required: 
Good communication 
skills and a 'can do' at 
tituda. Also required: 
B.S. in planning, public 
administration, busi- 
ness administration or 
equivalent experience. 
Demonstrated experi- 
ence in management of 
housing programs and 
housing issues sited 
ing older Kansans Ex- 
perience with HUD pro- 
gram* and computer 
skill* preferred. Sterl- 
ing salary $17,800 plus 
benefits Submit cover 
letter, resume and 
three references to 
Screening Committee, 
NC-FH Area Agency on 
Aging, 437 Houston St., 
Manhattan. KS 66502 
Applications must be 
received by April 26. 
(994 EOE/AA 

HARVEST HELP wanted. 
Need combine and 
truck drivers for sum 
mar wheat harvest. 
Board, room, and good 
pay. Home before 
tchool starts 

(913077-2094. 

HAVE FUN, make memo- 
ries and money I Chris- 
tian family harvesters 
need kitchen helper, 
laundry, cook and 
clean. Half day for 
$500, full day $1000 
plus room and board. 
No couch potato**- po- 
sition filled. 
(3161328-4232. 

HELP WANTED- INSPEC- 
TOR of utility poles. 
Will train. Requires a 
kit of walking along util- 
ity tines in rural Hutchi- 
son area. Approximate- 
ly threa months work. 
Start in May. $7/ hour 
after training. Phone 
(303)482-6550 for addi- 
tional information end 
application. 

HELP WANTED for custom 
harvest- combine op- 
erators and truck driv- 
er*. Experience pre 
ferrad. Call 

(3031483-7490 evening*. 

INTERNATIONAL EM- 
PLOYMENT- Make up 
to $2000- $40000 plus/ 
month teaching basic 
conversational English 
in Japan, Taiwan, or S. 
Korea. No latching 
background or Asian 
languages required. For 
information call: 

(206)632-1148 
exlJ5768. 

LABORERS NEEDED for 

conatruction work. 
Start immediately Call 
1913)841-6347. 

LABORERS NEEDED. Land 
scape and retaining 
wall experience re- 

Suired. Start imme 
lately, cell 

(913)841-6347 

NANNIES WANTED- Poel- 
tlon* nationwide, sum 



mer or yeer round, ex- 

Serience not required, 
real pay and benefits, 
free travel. 

(612)643-4399. 

NANNY/ CHILOCARE giv- 
er. Mature, responsible, 
loving person. Wanted 
to care for one and 
three yeer old girl* at 
our horn* Monday- Frl 
dey, 7:30a.m.- S:30p m 
beginning May 16, 199* 
Or August 1994. Part- 
time si so a possibility 
Permanent position, 
good pay. Call 776-8338. 

NEWSPAPER AOVER 
TISINQ BALES. Mont 
gomery Publicetions 
- hat sn opening for an 
advertising sate* repre- 
sentative to service ac 
counts In our mufti pub 
lication area. Must be 
responsible, well- or- 
ganized self, starter 
who can produce re- 
sult* with minimal su- 
pervision. Previous 
media salsa experience 
preferred. Base ttlary 
plus commission and 
mileage allowance 
Sand resume IN CON- 
FIDENCE to Daily 
Union, P.O. Box 129, 
Junction City, Kansas 
66441 or fill out applies 
lion at 222 West 6th 
Street. 

NON-SMOKING DAYCARE 
provider wanted for 
two kid* age* 2 and 5. 
Part-time or tull-tim*. 
776-0881. 

PART-TIME ORAFTSMAN 
needed for residential 
construction 539-6640. 

PART-TIME MAIN- 

TENANCE perton need- 
ed May 15 tor 60 apart- 
ment*, ba*ic plumbing, 
electrical, and carpen- 
try skills needed. Re- 
spond to P.O. Box 1285 
Menhattan. 

PRESCHOOL-QUALITY 
PROGRAM 

hsa opening tor 1994- 
95 tchool year Teacher 
poaltion Monday-Fri- 
day mornings. Degree 
and early childhood ex- 
perience required. 
Send resume and refer- 
ence* to Education Di 
reetor. 121 N. Sixth, by 
April 18. 7766625. 

PRESCHOOL— QUALITY 
PROGRAM has open 
ing for 1994-95 school 
yeer. Assistant teacher 
position Tuetday/Thure- 
day mornings Send re- 
auma/ references lo Ed- 
ucation Director, 121 N, 
Sixth, by April 18. 776- 
6625. 

RILEY COUNTY ha* an at 
needed part-time 112- 

1B hours/ week! posi- 
tion to work with PC ut- 
eri, could be full-time 
summer Requires PC 
knowledge with DOS, 
Windows, help detk 
and database develop 
ment experience. De- 
tire experience with the 
following applications: 
Word, Excel, Lotus. 
Quattro Pro, and Word 
Parted Pay It $6 17/ 
hour. Apply at Perton 
nal and Information 
Systama. 110 Court- 
house Plata third floor, 
through April IB. 1994 
EEOE. 

STUDENT CONSULTANT: 
Experience with both 
Mainframe and Micro 
com pu tan, along with 
GPA will ba selection 
criteria. Undargradu- 
etet with employment 
potential of two yeer* 
given preference. Cor\- 
tact: Joyce in Room 16 
Nichols Hall, by 5p.m.. 
Mon April 16, 1994 No 
phone calls 

SUMMER EMPLOY- 

MENT. Experienced 
Combine or Truck 
Drivers needed for 

custom wheat her 
veiling operation. 
Motel and Meala In- 
cluded. Waget bated 

on experience Work 
from May 20 thru Au 

fuel 15, 1994. From 
aiat to Montana. 
Lancaster Harvesting. 
Dodge City, Kansas. 
Call Now 1316)227-8821. 

SUMMER WORK available 
at KSU Vegetable Re- 
search Farm, OaSoto 
(Kansas City aree). $6/ 
hour/ 40 hours per 
week Must have own 
transportation to the 
farm. Contact Dr. Cha- 
rles Mart, Horticulture, 
Waters Hall 532-6170 
or Christy Negel (tarns) 
for more information. 



SUMMER WORK. $470 per 

week average Good 
track record needed. 

Call 1 800-840 2840 

THE CITY of Manhattan, 
Kansas hat two posi- 
tions tivei labia For Crew 
Leader* to supervise 
youth work crew* in a 
variety of perks related 
activities Salary; $5 50- 
$6. Call Terry DeWeese 
« 587-2757. 

THE CITY of Westmore 
land is accepting appli- 
cations to fill the posi 
lion of pool manager 
WSI certification re- 
quired for furthar in- 
formation call 
1-457-3361 or request 
an application from 
City Hall 202 Main St. 
Westmoreland. 

TRAVEL FROM Texas to 

Montana on a profes- 
sional wheat harvesting 
Crew. Guaranteed 
monthly wage, bonua, 
room and board. Call 
(913)567.4849. 

VISTA DRIVE-IN is now hir 
Ing for full or part-time 
help. Flexible hours 
available. Apply in par- 
son 1911 Tuttle Creak 
Blvd. or 2700 Anderson 
Ave. 

WANTED HARVEST 

HELP. Run three 1994 
Case international com. 
bine*. Thraa 1991 
Chevy Kodiak automat- 
ic twin screw trucks. 
Pay i* $1000- $1200 a 
month room and board 
Is provided. Need CDL 
drivers license We will 
help obtain CDL over 
Spring Break. Prefer 
non-smokers, 
non-drinkers and no 
drug users. Gaines Har- 
vesting 1913)689-4660. 

WEATHER OBSERVER 
needed for the Weather 
Data Library. Must be 
available 7- 8am and 7- 
8pm year- round includ- 
ing some weekends 
end holidays. 15- 30 
hour*/ week. Preference 
given to undargradu 
ate* with two years 
availability. Applies 
tions In 211 Umberger 
Hall 

330 1 



Business 
OpportunltJos 

Tha Collegian cannot 
verify the Tlnanciel po- 
tential of advertise 
ment* In tha Employ 
ment/Career classifica- 
tion. Readere are ad- 
vised to approach any 
euch business oppor- 
tunity with reasonable 
caution. Tha Collegian 
urges our readers to 
contact the Batter But! 
neea Bureau, SOI SE 
Jefferson, Topehe, KS 
6*6071190 
(9131232-0454 

ATTENTION STUDENTS: 
Earn extra cash stuffing 
envelope* *t home. All 
material* provided. 
Send SASE to Midwest 
Mailers P.O. Box 395, 
Olethe, KS 66061. Im- 
mediate Response. 



400 



OPEN 
MARKET 



4101 



Items lor Sale 



1990 EX 500 Kawataki. 
4600 mile. Blue and 
white Excellent condi- 
tion. Garaged $2200 
Tan marble Four-per- 
son hot tub, $1750, 
776-6649. 

CAP AND gown Phd 
length 56. 1 6-foot 
Grumman aluminum 
canoe, old lime pad- 
die*; two Santouci life 
jecketa, vests and pll 
low*. 539-4112 

FOR SALE blender $10. CD 
player $75. entertain- 
ment center $60, end ta- 
bles SS, grill $10, stereo 
cabinet $10, chair, 
539-2228 

PIONEER CAR cassette re- 
ceiver, JS-2 14 car equal- 
iter/ amplifier and 
Pioneer stereo speak 
ers 937-9344. 



Thigh Cream 
*25 ' 

I ; Manhattan Weight j ; 

Loss Clinic 

2 1 7 Southwlnd 



SAMYANG ZOOM lane 
with Macro. 60 300mm. 
Uaad twice, works 
great. Need money. 
$100 or best offer, Lau- 
rie 687-0598. 



Furniture to 
tesiy/asBll 

COUCH, TWO chairs, cof- 
fee table, matching set. 
western style. $100. 539 
2856, leave message. 

MUST SELL couch, chair, 
lamp and super tingle 
waterbed. 539 0550 

SIMMONS QUEEN tire 
maltreat- $60, queen 
alt* man rest and box 
springs tet for $60, 
sofa $50 or best offer, 
coffee tables- $15 a 
piece. 776-7883, leave 
message. 

4201 



<ter*0*/Ysrd 



THREE FAMILY Garage 
Sale. Lota of nice Jr./ 
Mines clothe*. Sizes 
small, large, 3, 5, 9, 10, 
12, 14. Toys, lot* ol 
styles of earring t, 
book*, cassettes, CD's. 
45's, 33' s. Kitchen sup 
plies tnd lots of great 
stuff. 2427 An-derson, 
Sat., 8 30 

5p.m., Sun., 9- 3:30. 



Auction 



BIKE AUCTION Frl., April 
29, 1994, Sp.m., 701 N 
17th Manhattan, KS. 
The Kansas Stat* Uni- 
versity Police Depart- 
man! will auction bicy- 
cles that were impound- 
ed as abandoned prop- 
erty. To claim »ny of 
thia property, present 
proof of ownership to 
the Kansas Stale Uni- 
versity Folic* Depart 
ment, 701 N. 17th, Man- 
hattan KS, between 
8a.m. and 5p.m., Mon. 
through Fri. Property 
not claimed by April 29, 
1994 will be sold at Pub- 
lic Auction to the high- 
eat bidder, at Sp.m. at 
the Kansas State Uni- 
versity Police Depart- 
ment. A list of the items 
being sold will be post 
ed on University bulle- 
tin boards and avail- 
able at Ihe Kansas 
State University Police 
Department. 



Stereo 
IqulptWeMlt 



10 INCH SUB woofers, 
RCA VCR four-head 
with VCfl PLUS Call 537 
1724 »ft*f Sp.m. 



Tickets to 
Buy/aWI 



BROOKS AND Dunn Tick- 
et* for sale. Two in sec- 
tion nine, row 19 and 
one in section eight 
row three. Call Toby 
Rush 532 5212. 



Not enough 
| time on your 
I hands to get 

I everything 

done? 

Check the 

Classifieds 

service directory. 

CIUNU1 Mill 
DLLEGIAN 

KrtUic 103 532-6SSS 



ADVERTISING PRODUCTION 



Publication Practice 
JMC 360 

Get training and gain experience while earning one hour of 
credit this fall. Attend class one day a week from 8:30 a.m.- 
1 1 :30 a.m. The day of the week is your choice based on 
availability. Only two positions left so sian up early. The 
instructor's permission is required. 

The experience you earn in the fall would qualify you to apply 
for a paid position in the spring. 



<r 



r <* 



** 8 a.m.-3 p.m. 
for more information and syllabus 




BROOKS AND Dunn tick- 
ets lor sale. 537.7098 

TWO BROOKS and Dunn 
tickets. Section eight, 
chair backs, better than 
average seat* Cell 539 
1582. 



5(H) 



TRANS- 
PORTATION 



1977 BLAZER four wheel 
drive, rally wheals.- new 
tires. 1959 Chevy 
school bus, excellent 
shape, runs good. 1955 
Chevy big window pick 
up. 1937 1 1/2 ton 
Chevy truck. 1959 
Chevy short wide bed. 
fleetside with Nova tub 
frame Call 537-92S7 
after 530 p.m. or leave 



1986 CAMERO, V-8, need* 
tune- up, asking 12,400 
Call 778-1172 You can 
call after 10pm, leave 
a message. 

1988 NOVA. whit*, air. 
auto. 88,000 Great, rali 
able car. Asking $2960 
778-8820 

,1988 RENAULT Alliance. 
Red four-door 108K 
miles. Very clean, r.uns 
could use engine work. 
$500 or best offer, Lau- 
rie 587-4598. 

1988 T-BIRD Turbo Coupe. 

Excellent condition, au- 
tomatic sunroof, doors, 
teats. window*, 

five-speed, ground ef- 
fects, loaded, 95,000 
miles Must sell, $4000. 
call Ruse 776-3231. 

FOR SALE: 1992 Maida 

Protege LX Five speed, 
9,100 miles, power 
windows, locks, mag 
wheel*, excellent condi 
tion. $9,150 Call 532 
2832 

520 1 



Mcycl— 



21-INCH SCHWINN World 
10-spe*d- Excellent con- 
dition. Low mileage 
Beet offer. 539-8211 

TREK 920 Antelope with 
lock S200. 587 0861 
leave message. 



Motorcycles 

1974 VAMAHA DT 250, 
street/ trail, run* good, 
good lire*, new battery, 
under 3000 miles, $500 
776-2385. 

1982 SUZUKI GS750T, 
run* excellent, new 
rear tire, very good con- 
dition, S 1200 or best off 
er. 778-7860, ask for 
Chris. 

1988 HONDA Hawk GT: Ex- 
cellent mileage, under 
6,000 miles, bought 
new in 1991 537 3295 

600 



TRAVEL/ 
TRIPS 



AJrpltw Tlckf 

DOMESTIC AIRLINE ticket: 
from anywhere to any- 
where I round! rip is ok). 
Valid until Nov.. with a 
male's name on. Fsc* 
value $298 or beat off. 
ar. Call 539-7067. 




WfttTfi you're 

ready to 

advertise, tune 

in with the 

Classifieds. 

CtANWSSTiTt 
0LLEG1AN 

I Kediie lit. 532-655 



You'll never 
know unless you 
try ...advertising. 

CUNMsmrt 
OLLEGLAN 

. Ktdlk IBS WH!W 



4 g Friday, April 1g. 1094 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



K-State 
alone 
in fee 
cutting 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 

Finally, K-State wishes to 
increase the graduate application 
fee for the College of Architecture 
and Design from $15 to $30 to pay 
for increases in the costs of process- 
ing the applications. Although this 
increase was on the agenda, it was 
not discussed by the regents. 

With the failure of the Union 
expansion fee referendum, manda- 
tory fees at K-State will decrease 
from $201 .55 to $192.55 per semes- 
ter, a 4, 5 -percent decrease. K-State 
is the only regents university that 
will lower student fees next year. 

K-State-Salina students have 
expressed concern about an equip- 
ment fee for the College of 
Technology beginning this fall. 

According to a representative of 
the campus' administration! stu- 
dents arc willing to pay the fee for 
equipment but arc concerned about 
the tuition increases. 

He said students are skeptical 
whether the tuition increases will 
benefit them. The staff requested to 
refer the fee to the Regents Tuition 
and Fees Committee in order to 
reevaluate. 

According to regents figures for 
fiscal year 1994, K-State (including 
the Salina campus) has 575 faculty 
members holding tenure, 70 percent 
of those eligible. 

Wichita State University and 
Emporia State University arc the 
only regents universities which 
have lower percentages of tenured 
eligible faculty. 

K-State has more instructors vs. 
ranked faculty than any other 
regents school, according to infor- 
mation provided by the regents. 

K-State had a decline of 22 eligi- 
ble tenure positions, which, accord- 
ing to the board, may be due to 
more graduate teaching assistants, 
temporary staff or a decline in 
enrollment. 

K-State moved one of its distin- 
guished professorships from veteri- 
nary medicine to animal science. 

Dr. James Marsden, President of 
the American Meat Institute of 
Arlington, Va., was unanimously 
chosen by a hoard's subcommittee 
to fill this position at K-State. 

He will receive $25,000 in addi- 
tion to his University salary. 

Marsden's move to K-State may 
result in the American Meat 
Institute moving to K-State or 
another mid western university. 

The Kansas Livestock 
Association and the Kansas Beef 
Council are planning to provide 
$320,000 to support K-States beef 
research projects as a gesture of 
interest in Marsden. 

The meeting was briefly inter- 
rupted by K-State President Jon 
Wefald to introduce the university's 
new men's head basketball coach, 
Tom Asbury. 

Asbury told the Board that he 
found K-State t,o be attractive 
because of "the challenge of Big 
Eight coaching" and what he called 
a supportive administration. 



We accept 
news tips 



532-6556 



Call 
1-800-MONEY: 101 



Commerce Bank 



Lender Cods 813979 



Organ donations 
give precious life 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3 delicately as possible." 



the year, but will be busy April 
17-23 during National Organ & 
Tissue Donor Awareness Week. 

It is important to tell family 
members about organ donation. 
Sue Neal said. 

"It's important to discuss it 
with your family." she said. 

Even though a person may 
carry a donor card, if nobody in 
the family knows about it, they 
may be able to deny organ dona- 
tion, she said. 

"There is nothing awkward 
about organ donation." 

The Neals said they wanted to 
dispel any misconceptions about 
organ donation. 

"When they're taking the 
organs, they're not mutilating the 
body." Ian said. "They do it as 



A patient has to be pro- 
nounced brain dead before any 
organs can be donated. 

It is important brain death 
does not get confused with being 
in a coma, Steve Neal said. 

Brain death is a total absence 
of brain activity. The only thing 
keeping the organs usable are the 
machines. 

People who experience a car- 
diac death, such as heart failure, 
can donate various tissues and 
eyes, she said. 

"I see no wrong in any of it," 
Sue Neal said. "All I see is right 
on both sides. The end is life, 
which should be very precious to 
each one of us," 



Camels on Hudson's ranch 
only ones in Riley County 



CONTINUED FROM MGE 7 

the ranchers. 

"The camels, or '200 critters,* 
as we call them, don't have any 
regulations that govern them. 
They are in the same line as the 
cow and graze in the fields like 
any other animal, " he said. 

Field said the camels on 
Hudson's ranch arc the only ones 
he knows of in the Riley and 



Geary county area. 

He said people raise quail for 
breeding and llamas for wool, 
but he's not sure why Hudson 
would choose to own camels. 

"I really have no idea in the 
world why he would own them. 
It seems like it would be quite a 
bit of work and worry. A lot of 
people have those things for self 
amusement," Field said. 



j April 23 

1994 



T 



■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 



More than 
B $500 in 



falsity 





For information 
or to enter, call 
539-2321 Basketball Tournament 

J Ask for Mark Dikeman or Doug Gruenbacher. 

Entry Deadline April 17. 

a 




Committee hears appeals 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

The sanction forbidding him to 
run as a write-in candidate was too 
harsh, he said, and he said he 
thought the decision was arbitrary 
because he did turn in an expendi- 
ture report Monday when the com- 
mittee contacted him. 

Three other candidates turned in 
late expenditure reports, but two 
were left on the ballot and given 
another sanction, and two were dis- 
qualified. 

Bailey said two candidates were 
not taken off the ballot because they 
had turned in their expenditure 
reports before the committee meet- 
ing Sunday night. 

Bailey said that out of the 13 
candidates who didn't turn in 
expenditure reports, the two that 
remained on the ballot were those 
who made an effort to turn in their 
reports without being notified by 
the committee. 

Also, the Election Committee 



made every effort to contact the dis- 
qualified candidates so they could 
have a hearing, Bailey said, includ- 
ing leaving messages on machines. 

Tonya Foster, senior in journal- 
ism and mass communications, also 
appealed her removal from the bal- 
lot for turning in an expenditure 
report late. 

Foster, who was elected as a 
write-in candidate to the Board of 
Student Publications, said she 
turned in the report on Monday 
morning before the committee 
called her. 

Foster said the guidelines for 
violating the regulations were arbi- 
trary and vague. 

She asked the tribunal that the 
section dealing with expenditure 



report violations be reformed. 

Chris A vila, graduate student in 
secondary education, said he failed 
to turn in his expenditure report 
because he was seriously ill and had 
missed both work and school. 

Avila also said he was never 
contacted about his disqualification 
and was denied his right to a hear- 
ing. 

Presidential and vice presidential 
candidates Jared Adams and Janelle 
Moore said they weren't able to 
turn in their expenditure reports 
because they were out of town at a 
forensics tournament. 

Moore also said they were 
denied due process because they 
did not learn of their disqualifica- 
tion until the day of the election. 



Experience the 
Global Classroom 

k "3HL 



London 

Paris 

Rome 

Athens 

Frankfurt 

fifl wt rarfi wm from Kn 
pjrfm lcssxt»fB8jpp*r i 



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i C*y biscd an roLndbn? 
BHnotrci4ferJrcj%a 
I wcrkJVfldr dMMtaflt 



Council Travel 

1-800-2 -COUNCIL 

(1-800-226-8624) 



Call For A Free 
Student Trjvcli magazine 




Is a good attention getter, but so is... 

The Big 8 
Men's Soccer Tournament 

April 16, 17 
Anneberg Sports Complex 

(one mile past Westloop Center on Anderson) 

Saturday Games: 
9:30 a.m. KSU vs. ISU 
lp.m KSUvs.OSU 

4:30 p.m. KSUvs.CU 
Come see 

KSU Wildcat 



K-State shoot 

for its third 

straight 

Big 8 title! 



Soccer 




DO THE LOOP 



Located one mile west of K-State 's campus, Westloop 

Shopping Outer offer* the l>est in shopping, service*. 
and entertainment! 




NESPOR 

Wines & Spirits 

•Specializing in domestic and 
imported wines 'Large selection 
of cordials and liquors 'Special 
orders welcomed for parties and 

t weddings 'Case discounts 
1338 Westloop Place 
539-9441 



a fine jeweler 



l.l4N\Vi's||im|> S3M75I 



Includes 



office 



3$Hd 



Friday, April 22, 8 p.m. 

McCain Auditorium — Kansas State University 

PuMicaiculty$25,23.20'S<mk*m 

Can the McCain box office at 532-6428 for ticket Information. 
Open noon to 3 pm weekday*, Ticketi alio available (with tcrvioe charge) at 
Manhattan Town Center Ctiatomer Service Dealt, K- State Union Bookstore, and 
ITR (Fort Riley). VISA and MasterCard accepted. 

■ Pmoot wuh diiabMtiea call 332-6411 for aocaaaibility information. TOD/TOY 
turn may reach McCain throuffa Iba Kauai Relay Canter at 1 •■00-776-3777. 



Praaamd In pari by *u Kauu Am Cannaalon, * Kit. .fmty. 

Cmmi KM pnvkM fc* MaatiaMan Matkal Cm Mr 
AddHtoul mm* purtaVd by tn laama Wda» Durtt 
I MomMrt by (M Pifcnda c 



Mmxtal andamanl by < 



• odtfeCakvandbytw 



©ccS^ 



and Book Shop 

/office supplies 
/office furniture 
/books & magazines 



1 IIM\Y<'s.lnii|> "M.1JM 
11-7 p.m. Mon-ln 

Hl-7[j.m. Sat \ Sun 



Something's Always !M 

Ben Franklin Crafts is 

always getting In new 

Items to help you with 

that special projectl 

■beads *balsa *art 

supplies •styrofoam 

•greek paddles 

•yarn •frames 

•posters •prints 

•Jewelry 

Come see what's newt 
Ben Franklin (SattA 

your Cnattvt Outltt * 

Wejtfoop Shopping Cntr 339 94 1 1 
Mon.-m, &9, Sat. 9-7, Sun. 14 



little Caesars 

Pizzal Pizza! 

Two great pizzas! 
One low price. 

Alwaysl Always! 

CTQ thirty -three I 
D3V thirty threel 

In Westloop 



BORCK3 

FineMenawrar 

•Sportcoats 
•Sportswear 



*& 



•Suits 

•Tuxedos 



shampoo and blowdry I 

(One coupon per customer) j 

I 

I 
I 



537-8636 




NATURES imftr 

82 011 

Eufcanuba Dog op Cat 
Food With Counon 

(■ttaiyioftafl) 

Explraa4-8-1994 
Iffl IMHttMt MM 



Watt 

'Welti**?. 

1318 Westloop Shopping Outer J 
S39l6001 

!©%«""! 

FRIDAY NICHT 
SEAFOOD BUFFET' 

CEXP. 4-51-94) 
OG4 WESTLOOP 5J9-8888 



Restaurant 



DEAVTY SALON! 




Support Your 
Local Brewery! 

Hand crafted beers,,. 
Homestyle cooking.,. 
Private room... 
off-site catering... 
and 

FREE LIVE MUSIC 

every Thursday 




InWejUoop £9^500 



$5 a haiicut i 

with this coupon 
1129 Westloop 530-2921 j 

(on the wot tide) 




Thh coupon tntltlei you to 



■eve 1 0% off the toit of 
therapy trvetmenn for relief 



ilnful 




) trl Wreath 539-5622 j 

MNNfiTTfiN 
CHIROPRACTIC 

1127 Wa ttl POP Shopping Cntr. j 



1 



/^ KANS. 



Exp, Date 00/00 
Kansas State Historical Society 
Newspaper Section 
120 II 10th 
Topika KS *« 12 

i^ O X/Xl lit 



Collegian 





APRIL 18, 1994 



KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66506 



VOLUME 99A, NUMBER 138 




Brooks and Dunn fans 
boot scoot in aisles 



ORAM MACKWVCotogian 
Kix BfOOks, vocalist for country music duo Brooks 4 Dunn, hammers out a guitar riff In the 
song, "Hard Wortdn' Man," during the ancora of their ahow Friday night in Bramlaga Collsaum. 



Cellefiin 

They claimed to 
be rednecks, 
and they put 
on a show that 
appealed to every 
virtue of redneckness. 

The songs about hard -work in' 
people were there, the songs about 
a woman leaving a despairing man 
were sung, and the 8,600 people 
in Bramlage Coliseum scooted 
their boots. 

Brooks and Dunn, with open- 
ing acts Aaron Tippin and Toby 
Keith, showed K-Statc a good 
country time. 

Good-ol' country boys 
hammed it up from start to finish, 
Aaron Tippin's opening-act per- 
formance was rowdy, humorous 
and American true blue. 

He hammed it up and worked 
the crowd. 

He was full of energy. He sang 
songs of women leaving and a car 
that isn't pretty and may not run 
yet — "There Ain't Nothin* 
Wrong With the Radio." In addi- 
tion, he appealed to the work ethic 
in "Workin' Man's Ph.D.," and he 
told the crowd. "You've Got to 
Stand for Somethin '" 

Tippin was ornery; he played 
on and interacted with the crowd. 
He left audience members on their 
feet demanding an encore, rare for 
an opening act. 

While he may not have the 
recording success or the name sta- 
tus of Brooks and Dunn, his live 
performance is quite remarkable 
and was a hard act to follow. 

He threatened to steal the 
show. 

What put Brooks and Dunn 
over the top was the group's wide- 
ly appealing music and the incred- 
ible back-up band. 

Their music is good — really 
really good. They have cranked 
out hit after hit. and they perform 
them well. 

Their success in the studio is 




what saves their live performances 
at times. 

The audience recognizes and 
responds to the familiar music, 
and it is a music that appeals to 
the American cowboy culture. 

Once Kix Brooks hit his 
momentum, he was unstoppable. 
He exchanged high fives with 
audience members, wiggled his 
rear, and hammed it up. 

However, it took him half of 
the show to hit this momentum. 

Brooks and Dunn have the 
ability to play a varying range of 
music, from the foot-stompin' 
hunky tonk to the infamous sad 
country ballad. 

Everything from the rowdy 
redneck plea of "Rock My World 
(little country girl)" to "She Used 
to Be Mine," which is sad, melo- 
dramatic and even downright' 
despairing. 

■ tQfMG IMIIIO HI Hlf 1I1IS1 

The highlight of the show was 
"The Boot Scootin' Boogie." 
People were dancing in the aisles. 
Brooks was swing dancing with 
women in the audience, and hun- 
dreds of balloons fell from the 
rafters. 

They left the audience stomp- 
ing their feet, chanting and wait- 
ing for more. 



Brooks came out for the encore 
in a purple K-State T-shirt 
answering the audience's call with 
"Hard Workin' Man," finishing 
the concert in true redneck style 
by paying tribute to the dedicated 
blue-collar worker. 





EST 


News Dig 


►ASSAULT-WEAPON BILL 


LACKS VOTES IN HOUSE 


WASHINGTON — 


in th* streets.' Rap 


Support*™ of • ban on 


Charles Schumer. D 


■si Bull weapons are 


NY., said In an Inter- 


1 5 to-20 voles shot in 


view Sunday. Thai 


the House of 


Hous* vuted again at 


Repreaentattv**, a kay 


an assault weapons 


congressman said 


ban two years ago. but 


Sunday. 


■ lot has changed 


In trie latest head 


since then " 


count by Haul* 


Schumer is chairman 


Democratic leaders, a 


ol th* House Judiciary 


bill banning assault- 


subcommmae on crtm* 


style weapons such as 


and leading sponsor of 


U*» and AK-47s is shy 


ihe assault weapons 


ol a majority, raising 


ban. 


the prospect ol a major 


The Serai* last fall 


disagreement between 


passed ■ 122 billion 


the House end Senate 


crime bill that included 


on anti-crime leglsta- 


the weapon* ban. 


1 And It very iurpns- 




ing Willi all the may- 




bam going on 






laanriiTin nans 


► U.S., UNIVERSITY FLAGS 


LOWERED FOR SOLDIERS 


President Clinton 


Black Hawk heli- 


ordered American 


copters were on a rou- 


Hags to be at half- 


tine humanitarian 


mast until sunset 


mission when the two 


today in honor or 26 


F-I5s fired air-to-air 


American soldiers 


miMiles at the heli- 


killed by friendly fire 


copters. 


Thursday. 


Jim Lehne, K State 


Two U.S. Army 


police sergeant, said 


helicopters were shot 


all three flag) at the 


down by Air Force 


entrance of the 


jets over Iraq when 


University will be at 


the P-I5i wrongly 


half maji 


identified the heli- 


"The campus and 


copters at Iraqis vio- 


University Hags can't 


lating the "no- fly 


Tly higher than the 


lone" over Kurdish 


American flag," he 


areas. 


said. 


The two US. 






AMVJEMOUiai 



RCPD receives record calls 



Collegian 

Cabin fever and grass 
fires may have contributed to 
a record number of calls for 
service received by the Riley 
County Police Department 
on Saturday, Sgi Jay Mills 
said. 

RCPD received 216 calls 
for service. Normally, the 
RCPD receives about 1 30- 
160 calls on a Saturday. 



"I have no idea why. I 
guess the warm weather 
brought people out. There 
were also a lot of out-of-con- 
trol fires and injury acci 1 
dents" - 

Mills said the calls are the 
most the RCPD has received 
in 10 years. 

To respond to each call, 
RCPD prioritized calls and 
responded to the more seri- 
ous calls first. Also, people 



had to wait longer than usual 
for a response to their calls. 

Mills said in the past 10 
years the number of calls has 
increased, but there has been 
only a small increase in the 
number of officers. 

"There has been some 
increase, but in proportion 
(to the increase in calls) it 
hasn't been the same," he 
said. "This is probably true 
for any city in America 



today." 

Eight or nine years ago, 
RCPD received 100 calls a 
day on a Saturday, he said. 

"Now we are much more 
cautious about giving offi- 
cers time off on the week- 
ends," Mills said. "We try to 
keep them available to 
respond." 

Mills said the high num- 
ber of calls continued all 
weekend. 

"The way things are going 
today, we may have a record 
number of calls for a 
Sunday." 



Communities pull together for base 



TAWWYA 

Collegian 

Recent talk about the 
future of Fort Riley doesn't 
have local residents waving 
the flag of surrender. 

Instead, area communi- 
ties appear to be pulling 
together in a show of strong 
support for the base, Larry 
Plumlce, president of 
Landlords of Manhattan, 
Inc. and retired Fort Riley 
officer, said. 

"We have a lot of smart 
people, rolling up their 
sleeves, working together," 
Plumlce said. "Everybody's 
brainstorming all the way 
through the city." 

The base is the largest 
single employer in Kansas 
with a payroll of $51 1 mil- 
lion dollars. Fort Riley also 
accounts for 17 percent or 
$5 1 .8 million of total retail 




sales in Riley County and 
25.3 percent or $27.3 mil- 
ion in Geary County, 
according to figures from 
Kansans for a Strong Fort 
Riley. 

One of the factors Fort 
Riley has going for it is the 
strength of the support from 
the communities, Jim 
Wright, general manager at 
Carlos O'Kcliey's said. 

"One of the strengths is 
the community support," 
Wright said. "1 think the 
community is aware of the 
economic situation with 
them and we need to not 



only be aware of it but take 
active steps. This is our 
chance on stage to let them 
know we are in support of 
Fort Riley. This is the final 
act of this play." 

A good percentage of the 
business at Carlos O'Kelly's 
in Manhattan is either from 
the base or a direct result of 
the payroll from Fort Riley, 
Wright said. 

"In my business, it would 
hurt me about 20 percent," 
Wright said. "But it could 
put a number of smaller 
restaurants out of business. 
In turn I would get some 
customers back to some 
extent from the fact that 
other restaurants would 
close. It's not pretty." 

The base is the mainstay 
of Allen's Grocery in 
Ogdcn. Kathy Nivert, man- 
ager, remains optimistic. 



"We just have the feeling 
that it's not going to hap- 
pen," Nivert said. "We're 
going to go day by day." 

If current military per- 
sonnel, their families and 
retirees were to leave, the 
housing market would see a 
change, Plumlce said. 

Military retirees might 
consider leaving because 
they'd lose the medical ben- 
efits and services that they 
receive from the army hos- 
pital, he said. 

"The homes people own 
would be taken off the mar- 
ket," Plumlce said. "We 
would see a short term 
renter's market for a couple 
of years. Prices might go 
down with a decreased 
demand." 

Some citizens feel all the 

hooplah over a possible 

■ Sec JUNCTION Page 10 



1004 STUDENT ILICTIOHS 

New 

election 

ordered 



j.u. pfUTtfm 



Collegian 

Student Tribunal threw out the results in the 
Student Government Association elections in all 
but three races Sunday. 

Candidates for all positions except Student 
Senate seats for the colleges of Business 
Administration and Veterinary Medicine will 
need to run for another general election on 
Wednesday, April 20. 

The student referenda will not require a new 
vote. 

Dates for the presidential run -off have not yet 
been announced. 

Five students appealed to the Student Tribunal 
Thursday on the grounds they had been improp- 
erly disqualified from the election by the Election 
Grievance Committee. 

In its final decision, written by acting chancel- 
lor Kyle Shipps, the tribunal found enough evi- 
dence the election process in all but the two elec- 
tions and the referenda had been improperly con- 
ducted. 

The tribunal also ruled that candidates who 
filed expenditure reports after the 5 p.m. April 8 
deadline shall be disqualified from the new elec- 
tion. 

According to the decision, those candidates 
will not even be allowed to run as write-in candi- 
dates, but Ed Skoog, student body president, and 
DeLoss Jahnke, Student Senate chair, will appeal 
that decision to the tribunal. 

Skoog said the SGA constitution states anyone 
can run as a write-in candidate, and said the tri- 
bunal does not have the power to take that right 
from anyone. 

He said he hoped to get the tribunal together 
sometime today to clarify that portion of their 
ruling. 

"The ballot is only a representation of a hand- 
ful of candidates." Skoog said. "It is the number 
of votes behind a name that matters. 

"Being on the ballot is a privilege," he said. 
'To put restrictions on write-in candidates is 
impossible." 

The tribunal called for a new grievance com- 
mittee to be formed of non-election-committee 
members, but Skoog said there would be no new 
grievance committee. 

Grievances will be handled by the Elections 
Committee or the tribunal because of time con- 
straints, he said. 

Tonya Foster, senior in journalism and mass 



■ Sec RESPONSES Page 12 




RULES 




sVaateaVU eaaUhlaW eaBkl'SnU aa eat BkBBBBafeaMaSB* aaalaBBBBta 

(MAY NOW RUN AS WWlaVW) 

JoefSnirTjerkgrtaJlWB 

Urn KuwraVartB and saences 

Amy Stwrtsorvarts and sciences 

James Waroy/arts and sciences 

Matt Nteman/arts and sciences 

Charley Herce/arts and sciences 

Todd texterccrteducatjon 

Jared Seery/engineemg 

Chris Avila/giaduale school 

Mchael Lano^nmuman ecology 

Mote MassJeoVFine Arts Council 

Tonya Foster/Board of Student Publications 

Leo Walsh/Union Gcvemrng Board (one-year term) 

Stetlany CarreVSBP 
Nabeeha Kazt/SBVP 

Jared Adam s/SBP 
Janelle Moore/SBVP 

NEW ELECTION EXPENDITURE REPORT 
REGULATION INFORMATION 

> Amount thai can be spent: 
A.SBP/S6VP-$196.50 
BAH others -$39.30 

> When reports are due 

A. All candtdates {those on the balot and (hose 
wto campaign as write-ins) must turn in an 
expenditure report by April 20 at 5 p.m. 

B. Those arxlidateswiw win an o^ 

of write-in but did not c*csaffy run is a wrte^mtst 
turn In an expenditure npfi r^ April 26 at 5 p.m. 

> Abtohietty no tali tsptftdtture reports stUm 



>Afl 




2 Monday, April 18, 1994 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



® National News 



by the Associated Press 



► COAST GUARD SEIZES BOAT 

LOS ANGELES — A Taiwanese 
fishing boat carrying 1 1 1 suspected 
illegal Immigrants was seized and 
taken away from U.S. waters by the 
Coast Guard on Sunday to prevent 
Its passengers Irom coming ashore. 

Authorities found 10 women. 101 
men and 10 male crew members 
aboard the 1 68-foot Jtn Ymn No. 1 
when they boarded it in international 
waters about 900 miles oil Sen 
Diego, the Coast Guard said 

Julie Reside, a State Department 
duty officer in Washington, DC, said 
the passengers are believed to be 



CARRYING IMMIGRANTS 

Chinese. 

This Incident has a* the charac- 
teristics of an alien smuggling ven- 
ture,* she said. 

Coast Guard officers boarded the 
boat Saturday, a week ahar it was 
spotted by a U.S. patrol plane Coast 
Guard cutters shadowed II for days 
to prevent entry into U.S. waters. 

The vessel, which got as dose aa 
290 miles off San Diego, would not 
respond to requests that It stop, the 
Coast Guard said. 

U.S. authorities would not say 
where the boat was being taken. 



► SURFERS DISCOVER 



► SMOKE CREATES 12-CAR PILEUP; 7-YEAR-OLD DIES 



EMPORIA — Smoke from a 
burning field near the Kansas 
Turnpike apparently caused a driver 
to slow down Sunday. Igniting a 
chain-reaction accident that involved 
up to 12 vehicles and left one child 
dead, authorities said. 

Jonathan Michael Lip pine otl. 7, 
Wichita, was killed in the accident, 
which occurred 15 miles south of 
Emporia about 1 p.m. 

A dispatcher lor the Kansas 



Turnpike Authority said it appeared 
that the child was in the second vehi- 
cle involved In the crash. He was 
declared dead at the scene. 

Dennis Stewart, a dispatcher lor 
the Kansas Highway Patrol, said 
about 10 other people were injured 
and were taken to various area hos- 
pitals. He said the accident appar- 
ently started alter a vehicle slowed 
down because of smoke blowing 
across the highway. 



SAN DIEGO - 
Lifeguards recovered trom 
the ocean the mutilated body 
of a woman believed to have 
been killed by a great white 
shark. 

"It had very large bites 
taken out of it,* city lifeguard 
Lt. Brant Bass said Saturday 
"She was In pretty bad 
shape." 

Two surfers found the 
body about 200 yards off the 
Sunset Cliffs beach Friday 
afternoon, he said. 

They saw a sea gull 
standing on something, and 
they paddled over, and It was 
this woman's body," Bass 
said. 

The woman, who was 
between 18 and 24. probably 
died as a result of shark 
biles. But it was poeetbte she 



attacked, Brian Blackboume, 
county coroner, said. 

Lifeguards have no plans 

to dose the beach. 



SPEECH CALENDAR FOR APRIL 18-21 



MONDAY, APRIL 18 

M. Powell Lawion, Philip Sloanc and Gerald 
Wersman will present 'Toward Quality in Special 
Care Units: The Role of Design and Assessment" 
from 12: 15 to 1:30 p.m. in the Union Sunflower 
Room. The speakers are participants in a major 
research initiative on specialized facilities for peo- 
ple with dementia, sponsored by the National 
Institute cm Aging. 

Dr. Craig Nelson of the Indiana University 
Department of Biology will present "Creation, 
Evolution and the Nature of Science" at 3:30 p.m. 
inAckert22I. 

Made Houston, candidate for Kansas Secretary 
of State, will be the guest speaker at the College 
Republicans meeting at 7:30 p.m. in Union 207. 

Stacey Shull of the California Greens Party will 
present "Environmental Organizing on the West 
Coast" from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in Union 213. 

TUESDAY, APRIL 19 

Richard Forsyth, professor and director of the 



College of Architecture and Design, will present 
"Bath, England: The Development of Its Historic 
Landscape" at 2:30 p.m. in the Union Little Theatre. 
Dr. Michael Akam of the University of 
Cambridge wilt present "The Evolving Role of Hox 
Genes in Arthropods" at 4 p.m. in Ackert 221. 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20 

Dennis Law, professor of landscape architecture, 
and Linda Law, third- grade teacher at Bltiemont 
School, will present "Sustainable Tropical Farming 
and Rainforest Ecological Education" at 7; 30 p.m. 
in Ackert 221. 

THURSDAY, APRIL 21 

The Twelfth Annual Friends of Mathematics 
Lecture will be at 2:30 p.m. in Card well 103. 

Margie Chan of the University of Utah 
Department of Geology will present "A 
Sedtmentologic Perspective on Paleoclimate in 
Non-Marine Deposits" at 4 p.m. in Thompson 213. 



I POLICE REPORTS J [.CAMPUS BULLETIN! 



K-STATE POLICE . ■ 

These reports are taken directly from the dairy logs of the 
k -State and Riley County Police departments Because of 
space constraints, not ell crimes are listed. 
SUNDAY, APML 17 ^^mHO^—m^^ 

M y.TJb p.m., ■ member of 
the Ahcam Field House Custodial 
staff called about juveniles jump- 
ing from Ihc balcony onto mat* 

RILEY COUNTY POLICE 



placed below An officer talked 
lo the subjects and advised them 
lo leave the building. 



SATURDAY, APRIL 161 

At 1:27 p.m.. sn injury, 
major -da mage accident was 
reported at Pitlsbury Crossing. 
Jose Zapata, Fort Riley, (truck a 



barbed-wife fence. Jerri and 
Robin Brack, Wichita, were 
injured. 



CORRECTION 



An April IS police report incorrectly stated that at 
12:26 a.m. April 14. Robert Li ngen feller. 301 Poll ska 
Lane, was arrested for battery following a dispute with 
his son, Shane Lingenfelter. 301 Poliska Lane. It should 
have said that Shane Lingenfelter was arrested for battery 
following a dispute with Robert Lingenfelter. The 
Collegian regrets the error. 



■ Ag Scudcru Council Committee application!! are available in 
W uteri 120. Positions include Ag Telefund coordinator and student 
and faculty awards chair. Applications are due to Waters 120 by 
noon today. 

■ Applications for co-hcnls and production staff foe the call-in 
talk-radio show "A Purple Affair" art available in the Office of 
Student Activities and Services in the Union and at the DB*2 stu- 
dios in McCain 317. Applications are due by 5 p.m. April 29. 

■ KSU Student Foundation scholarship application* are avail- 
able in the Office of Student Activities and Services. Applications 
arc due at 5 p.m. April 22 in mailbox »47 at the OSAS 

■ Applications for Union Activities Board "Advisor of the 
Year*' are available in the Office of Student Activities and Services. 
The deadline for applications is noon April 22. 

■ The last dov in pre enroll for summer 1994 courses is May 13, 
and the last day to pre-enroll for fall 1994 courses is July 22. 

■ Help an international student with spoken English and learn 
firsthand about a different culture. If interested, contact Kalhryn 
Hund at the International Student Center or at 5.12-6448. 

■ Grade reports for the spring 1994 semester will be mailed to 
students' permanent addresses May IB. Any change to permanent 
addr es s es needs to be done by May 1 3 in the Registrar' stMTke 



BULLETINS 



POSTMASTER'S NOTICE 

The Kansas State Collegian (USPS 29 1 020), a student newspa- 
per at Kansas State University, is published by Student Publications 
Inc.. Kedzie Kail 103, Manhattan, Kan 66506. The Collegian is pub- 
lished weekdays during the school year and once a week through 
the summer. Second class postage is paid al Manhattan, Kan. 
66502. 

POSTMASTER: Send address changes lo Kansas State 
Collegian, circulation desk. Kedzie 103. 
Manhattan, Kan 66506-7167. 



MONDAY, APRIL 18 

■ French Table will meet from noon lo 1:30 p.m. in Union 
Stateroom 2. 

■ German Club will meet at 4:30 p.m. in Union Station. 

■ Business Council will meet at 6:30 p.m. in Calvin 018. 

■ K-State Aikido Club will meet from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at 1 108 
Laramie St. 

■ Apostolic Campus Ministry will meet from 7:45 to 9 p.m. in 
Union 209. 

■ College Republicans will meet at 7:30 p.m. in Union 207. 
Macie Houston, candidate for Kansas secretary of stale, will be the 
guest speaker. 

■ Chimes will meet at 8:30 p.m. in Union 213. 

■ KSU Waters*! ing Club will meet at 9 p.m. in Union 207. 

■ Engineering Student Council will meet at 6:30 p.m. in Duriind 
132. 



i wExmmmmm 

YESTERDAY'S HIQHS AND LOWS 





RUSSJU. y* 

* sajVa Tortuy 

•3'42 *"* 

RDCNCITY 

79/41 



KANSAS 
CITY 

78748 



WICHITA* COfTEYVl LE 

mm •y* 1 



TULSA 
867*4 \ 




Today, mostly cloudy, very warm 
with highs in the 80s. Tonight, 
slight chance of thunderstorms 
with lows in the mid-50s. 
Tuesday, partly cloudy. 



Mostly sunny, highs 

jn the mid- 80s. 
Tonight, chance of 
thunderstorms, lows 
in the 50s. 



TOMORROW 



Tuesday, partly 
cloudy, high in the 
mid-70s. 






L. 



CLOSED CLASS LIST 



Summer 94 



00539 


03340 


00550 


03350 


00560 


03380 


00590 


03390 


00840 


03450 


00890 


03470 


00900 


03490 


00920 


03570 


00940 


03720 


00950 


03910 


00951 


03920 


00960 


03932 


01000 


04020 


01010 


04030 


01080 


04710 


01150 


04770 


01160 


04841 


01290 


04851 


01340 


05940 


01440 


05950 


01660 


05960 


01670 


05970 


01680 


05980 


01740 


05990 


01750 


06000 


01760 


06210 


01770 


06330 


01780 


06340 


01790 


06350 


02080 


06360 


02231 


06370 


02320 


06480 


02340 


07660 


02360 


07790 


02380 


08380 


02470 


09070 


02490 


09270 


02500 


80070 


02650 


80411 


02740 


80412 


02840 


80417 


02930 


80418 


03150 





00070 
00090 
00460 
00510 
01000 
01050 
01700 
02050 
02060 
02260 
02270 
02350 
02460 
02530 
02560 
02750 
02790 
02820 
02830 
02940 
03010 
03020 
03030 
03040 
03O50 
03060 
03070 
03080 
03090 
03100 
03110 
03120 
03130 
03250 
03270 
03320 
03430 
03470 
03520 
0353C 
03650 
03760 
03770 
03780 
03790 
03800 
03810 
03830 
03850 
03930 
03980 
04000 
04460 
04470 
04480 
04490 
04500 



04510 
04520 
05130 
05370 
05450 
05810 
05840 
05850 
05870 
05880 
05890 
05900 
05910 
05940 
05960 
05970 
05980 
05990 
06000 
06040 
06050 
06090 
06110 
06120 
06130 
06140 
06150 
06170 
06190 
06300 
06320 
06340 
06390 
06650 
06660 
06690 
06700 
06730 
07100 
07110 
07120 
07240 
07410 
07420 
07430 
07460 
07530 
07550 
07560 
07590 
07600 
07610 
07620 
07740 
07760 
07770 
07840 



C — Cancelled Class 



07850 
08160 
08170 
08190 
08200 
082 TO 
08230 
08250 
08270 
08280 
08290 
08310 
08340 
08350 
08360 
08370 
08380 
06390 
08450 
08460 
08520 
08650 
08730 
08850 
06880 
08890 
08900 
08920 
08970 
09130 
09140 
09150 
09180 
08220 
09230 
09240 
09310 
09570 
09760 
10150 
10191 
10240 
10251 
10300 
10350 
10381 
10420 
10500 
10540 
10550 
10610 
10650 
10800 
10830 
10940 
10950 
10960 



Fall 94 



10970 
10980 
10990 
11000 
11010 
11030 
11050 
11190 
11200 
11210 
11220 
11240 
11450 
11460 
11570 
lt580 
11620 
11630 
11640 
11660 
11700 
11720 
11750 
11760 
11790 
11820 
11830 
11930 
12410 
12470 
12510 
12910 
13300 
13340 
13420 
13430 
13460 
13470 
13490 
13600 
14070 
14340 
14460 
14680 
14710 
15040 
15050 
15090 
15140 
15180 
15230 
15240 
15260 
15300 
15330 
15340 
15390 



5470 
5500 
5520 
5530 
5540 
5630 
5700 
5750 
5770 
5830 
5850 
5880 
5900 
5940 
5980 
6050 
6060 
6180 
6210 
6230 
6250 
6280 
6270 
6280 
6290 
6330 
6370 
6390 
6440 
6490 
6530 
6550 
6590 
6640 
6650 
6680 
6700 
6940 
6950 
7130 
7230 
7250 
7420 
7710 
7930 
8090 
6240 
8380 
8390 
8470 
8570 
8580 
8590 
8600 
8610 
8950 
9200 



19680 
19690 
19700 
19710 
19720 
19730 
19740 
19750 
19820 
20350 
20560 
20570 
20580 
20590 
20600 
20630 
20640 
20650 
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20670 
20680 
20690 
20700 
20710 
20720 
20750 
20760 
20610 
21120 
21130 
21140 
21150 
21180 
21190 
21210 
21230 
21361 
21470 
21570 
21590 
21660 
21670 
21710 
22410 
22560 
22580 
22750 
22970 
23190 
23240 
23400 
23430 
23500 
23620 
23630 
23750 
24020 



24100 
24140 
24170 
25010 
25020 
25030 
25085 
25170 
25210 
25360 
25370 
25470 
25570 
25580 
25670 
25680 
25690 
25700 
25710 
25720 
25730 
25750 
25850 
25860 
25940 
26450 
26540 
26550 
26560 
26570 
26620 
26660 
26670 
26700 
26720 
26730 
26740 
26750 
26770 
287B0 
26790 
26820 
26840 
26890 
26900 
26920 
27000 
27100 
27210 
27220 
27290 
27300 
27340 
27360 
27370 
27430 
27440 



27450 
27470 
27480 
27620 
27630 
27640 
27740 
27780 
28040 
28050 
26060 
28070 
28080 
28090 
28100 
28110 
28120 
28130 
28140 
28150 
28160 
28170 
28180 
28190 
28360 
28370 
28410 
28630 
29491 
29501 
29511 
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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, April 18, 1004 



Lewis "Ro« 
Cloud* Jessep«, 

Norton resident, 
talks with ■ friend 
Saturday after- 
noon during K- 
StatV* 5th annual 
Pow-Wow. The 
•vent, which was 
In Ahoam Field 
In 



from all parts of 

Kansas and the 



CAHV 



Collegian 




Celebrating 




Colfcfiui 

Native 
Americans 
from all 
across 
Kansas and neighbor- 
ing states joined to cel- 
ebrate in Ahearn Field 
House Saturday. 

The celebration, known as a 
Pow-Wow, is sponsored for vari- 



ous reasons. One of them is the 
coming of summer, said Travis 
Blackbird, president of Native 
American Student Body and 
sophomore in environmental 
design. 

"Generally during spring there 
are a lot of celebrations and festi- 
vals celebrating the oncoming of 
summer," Blackbird said, 

"For us, it celebrates Native 
American month." 

The free Pow-Wow ran from 1 
to 10 p.m. 

From 1 to 5 p.m., people who 
weren't looking at various booths 



selling items such as jewelry and 
T-shirts, sat in the bleachers to 
watch gourd dancing. 

"Gourd dancing is a ceremoni- 
al dance," 2 Paws, a gourd dancer, 
said. "The beat of the drum is the 
beat of our hearts, which carries 
our prayers to Wakantanka." 
Wakantanka is the Indian word 
for God, 2 Paws said. 

The dance was done to honor 
war veterans, said Heidi 
Simmons, president of American 
Indian Science and Engineering 
Society and junior in early child- 
hood development. 

After the dinner break from 5 
to 7 p.m., there was a ceremony 
honoring veterans. Then the inter- 
tribal dancing began. 

During the intertribal dancing, 
all dancers, including men, 
women and children, gathered in a 
circle and performed dances spe- 
cific to their tribes. This type of 
dancing includes both men and 
women and all types of dancing. 



Blackbird said. 

This was the first time the 
Pow-Wow, sponsored by AISES 
and Native American Student 
Body, was held in Ahearn, 
Simmons said. 

"It's really nice to be in a larg- 
er building with more room," 
Simmons said. "It's nice to know 
that if it's raining, we're still 
inside." 

S fieri Davidson, sophomore in 
social work, said she heard about 
the Pow-Wow through her history 
of dance class. 

"It's really neat that the whole 
family is involved, with the little 
kids and women dancing," 
Davidson said. 

Robert Satterwhite, a senior at 
Junction City High School, went 
to the Pow-Wow with other stu- 
dents in Upward Bound. 

Satterwhite said he went to a 
Pow-Wow for the first time with 
his grandmother, who was a 
Blackfoot. 



Museums inform 
about native life 



Indians tell their 
story as institute 
changes goais 



Cotlflfiui 

Native American museums have 
made a 180-degree turn from what 
they used to be, a Smithsonian 
Institute coordinator said Friday in 
the Union. 

Martha Kreipe de Montaflo is a 
coordinator for the Native 
American section in the 
Smithsonian Institute in New York 
City. NY. 

Montano's career started in the 
Native American Museum in New 
York City in 1983, before it was 
part of the Smithsonian. 

Things were very different for 
Native Americans in New. York 
then, M ontano said. 

"When I first arrived at the 
museum 1 1 years ago, it was a very 
alienating experience," she said. " 

"It had been run by non-Indians 
since 1916." 

While Montano worked for the 
Native American Musuem, the staff 
wanted to find a bigger and better 
facility for the exhibits. 

"Ross Perot even offered $70 
million of his own money to relo- 
cate the Native American museum 
to Dallas," Montaflo said. 

"Instead of New York buildings 
giving us so many square feet for 
exhibits, Perot was talking about 
how many acres of land we could 
have." 

The museum declined his offer 
and in 1990, the Native American 
Museum became part of the 
Smithsonian. 

Many of the museum's posses- 
sions were donated by private col- 
lectors , including more than one 
million Indian artifacts that were 
given by the Heye Foundation, 
which was founded by George 
Heye. a collector. 

The museum exhibits recognize 
a responsibility to Indian history 



Native^ 

American 

His/ory 



and give Native 
Americans a 
chance to tell 
their side of the 
story, Montaflo 
said 

"This is a 
museum for 
Indians, not a 
museum about 
Indians," she 
said. 

The museum has displays from 
North, Centra] and South America. 

Native Americans work as cura- 
tors of the displays and they 
describe and name most of the 
exhibits. 

"Natives know about the things 
and how to use them, and they need 
to tell the stories," Montaflo said. 

Native Americans want the 
museum to inform people about 
their heritage, she said. 

Indian people want to pass 
information on to their children and 
to preserve the history of Native 
America, Montaflo said. 

The Native American display in 
the Smithsonian can be a resource 
for anyone, she said. 

Many Indian communities are 
closely involved with the 
Smithsonian wid are connected by 
fiber-optic lines, satellites or com- 
puters. 

For tribes that aren't technologi- 
cally equipped, they will communi- 
cate by mail, Montano said. 

"We know most people can't go 
to New York to sec the exhibits, so 
we must reach out beyond the walls 
of the museum to teach people 
about Indian life," she said. 

One audience member said she 
came to the lecture for a class and 
found it informative. 

"I came to listen for my anthro- 
pology class and this has been very 
interesting. 

"Some day, I would like to visit 
the Smithsonian in New York and 
see all the work she has done," Sara 
Lann, sophomore in elementary 
education, said. 




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PINION 



TELL US WHAT YOU THINK 

■ Utters to the Editor — c/o Den I se Cla rkl n 
Kansas State Collegian 
Kedzie116 
Manhattan, Kan. 66506 







In Our Opinion 



By the Collegian Editorial Board 



Tribunal's decision chance to make right 




The Studcot Tribunal decision to hold new 
elections is giving the Senate Elections 
Committee a second chance to get it right. 

Everyone deserves a second chance, and 
though the committee made some mistakes, 
this election fiasco should be a good learning 
experience for next year's student senators. 

Here's a few things we hope they teamed 
from this election: 

■ Slapping an election together in a little 
over a month is as precarious as cramming a 
semester's worth of material the night before 
a final. 

■ It's nice for everyone to follow the rules, 
but even better if they're following the same 
rules. Careful reform of election guidelines is 
obviously needed. 

■ One committee plus one committee made 
up of all but one of the same committee mem- 
bers and starring the same committee chair 
does not add up to two committees. It's just a 
confusing way of giving one committee extra 



work. 

■ Members of committees need to meet 
often enough to get their facts straight so they 
don't confuse people with conflicting infor- 
mation. 

■ Rules and sanctions should apply to 
everyone equally. 

■ Candidates who wish to represent stu- 
dents at K-State should recognize their 
responsibility to know and follow the rules. 
We don't need any more slackers in Student 
Senate. 

■ Wasting the students' time and money is 
not conducive to making students care about 
student government. Any more elections- like 
this and students will wonder if anyone can 
make a difference. 

Despite K- State's growing reputation as 
The Home of the Botched Election" we hope 
Wednesday's election will drive students to 
the polls to demand better government. How 
often do you get a second chance? 



You and I are responsible 
for bloodshed in Bosnia 



Sometimes the United States' political lead- 
ership could pass for invertebrates. 

I am amazed at the lack of spine and guts 
they have. We do have a conscience as a 
nation, but, apparently, we lack the willpower 
to act on it 

The United Slates — that's you and I — 
have been complicit in the wholesale slaughter 
of Bosnians as Serbs and Croatian* have prac- 
ticed a treacherous mission of genocide and 
land-grabbing at the expense of Bosnian 
Muslims. We have twiddled our thumbs as 
Bosnian blood poured over our hands. 

You and I have allowed this for three rea- 
sons. First, the United States joined in an inter- 
national arms embargo. There is no such thing 
as "international," at least not an international 
global super-government. When the word is 
used this way, as it often is in the press. I won : 
der: What and where is this "internation"? 
What are its laws? And who are its leaders? 

Of course, there is no such internation. 
There are only individual sovereign nations 
working together, sometimes for common 
goals. Yet, even though none of us can elect 
anyone to this mythological internation, the 
United States strictly obeys international poli- 
cies at the expense of our money and flesh. 

When the "international community" under 
the guise of the United Nations called for an 
arms embargo against the former Yugoslav 
republics, the United States complied, allow- 
ing Yugoslavia and Croatia to manufacture 
their own arms while the Bosnians were 
squeezed from both sides by those two coun- 
tries' ethnic cleansing and hunger for territory. 
(In America, we called it manifest destiny.) 

We should have allowed the Bosnians to 
defend themselves with dignity instead of 




being made to suffer worse than American 
stray dogs. You and I are responsible for the 
United States' participation in the embargo. 
You and I did not have the spine and guts to 
stand up to the "international community" and 
demand to allow the 
Bosnians to fight back. 
History will record that 
you and /just changed 
the channel and forgot 
about it. 

Secondly, we stood 
by and wondered what 
we should do, if any- 
thing, while the misery 
and blood poured. You 
and I were unsure about 
what our interests in 
Bosnia were, what 
money was to be made 
by getting involved and 
what was to be lost if 
we didn't. 

In a nation that has 
both practiced attempted genocide against its 
aboriginal peoples and welcomed the victims 
of the Holocaust, there has not been enough 
courage mustered up to find a reason to stop 
the slaughter, expatriation and incarceration of 
Bosnia's Muslims. While the events in Bosnia 
pale in comparison to the Nazi's crimes, these 
events and the intents behind them are just as 
evil. 

Finally, both Presidents Bush and Clinton 
have lacked the courage to act unilaterally. 
Americans have been outraged about events in 
Bosnia for months, but our leaders claim they 
can't do anything without the approval of our 
NATO and UN allies. It seems we fought the 



SCOTT 
ALLEN 

Miller 



Revolution and the War of 1812 only so 200 
years later our government could ask for 
European permission to do anything outside 
our borders. 

Imagine, if you will, if the United States 
had parked a few Navy cruisers off the 
Yugoslav and Croatian coasts. We could have 
issued an ultimatum that warned if the Serbs 
and Croats did not immediately cease their 
Tighting, our Tomahawk cruise missiles would 
rain down on Zagreb and Belgrade. Just imag- 
ine. Sure, it would have been brutal. Sure, it 
would have been rash. Sure, it would have 
upset our so-called allies. Sure, it would have 
stopped the bloodshed. 

The consequences of those actions would 
be few. After all, slapping sanctions on the 
United States would put the entire planet into a 
depression unlike any other. We also pay for a 
good deal of the United Nation's budget. Part 
of the United Nation's power is that the United 
States has always enforced its resolutions, but 
with us out of favor it would be impotent. 
U.N. ambassadors would have difficulty 
embargoing the United States when the United 
Nation's headquarters are in New York. 

Instead, we would actually gain the world's 
respect again. As a nation of actions and not 
just deeds, we would again be the envy of the 
world. 

The New World Order is a mandate against 
any country acting without United Nation's 
approval. This is as un-American as 
Communism and our present cowardice. 

We haven't had a president with the 
courage needed to buck this New World Order 
since Teddy Roosevelt. We need a president 
who speaks softly and carries a big stick again. 

Most of all, I wish we had a president who 
obeyed the will of us Americans rather than 
(he agendas of foreign diplomats. If that were 
so, maybe the Balkans wouldn't be so bloody. 

Scott Allan Millar Is a junior In radio and televi- 
sion. 



Readers Write 



Lighten up, BSU — cartoon 
doesn't deserve an apology 

Dear Editor, 

Kudos to the Collegian staff and Mike 
Mar leu for not apologizing for the harmless 
and witty editorial cartoon in Wednesday's 
edition of the Collegian. 

To think that a group like the Black 
Student Union demanded an apology, on the 
front page no less, just for something that 
was not meant to be taken seriously. 

I was upset and embarrassed at the fact 
that they had planned to take "action" at 
such atmeaningless thing. 

I'm sure this retaliation would have been 
in vain and caused further embarrassment to 
the group as a whole. 

BSU, you need to lighten up and realize 
that things will not always go your way. 

Ketsha A. Reed 
junior/criminal justice 

► Mil — MAUI 

Cartoons poke fun; that's 
what they're fcneant to do 

Dear Editor, 

In response to Thursday's write-up about 
a political spoof involving Shanta Bailey, 1 
would like to tell various members of the 



BSU to grow up and get over it. 

They need to open their eyes and see that 
not every person on this Earth is a racist. ■ 

I am a student-o' -color myself, and I 
know there are injustices far worse than the 
ones with which they concern themselves. 

Ms. Bailey is indeed a politician (a stu- 
dent politician, yes, but a politician still). As 
such, she opens herself to various opinions 
including those of the political cartoonist. 
Political cartoons are, by tradition, used to 
poke fun at any politician regardless of race. 

I know both Ms. Bailey and Mr. Marlett. 
They are both good people who are entitled 
to their own opinions. 

By the way, Mike, I like your spoofs; 
keep up the good work. So, BSU, get some 
business and get over it! 

Shylette W. Canon 
junior/veterinary medicine and music 

► p«rotrrY 

University needs debate on 
multicultural-overlay proposal 

Dear Editor, 

K-State is in the process of debating the 
merits of the diversity overlay requirement. 
The Faculty Senate may vote on the proposal 
by the end of this semester. The question I 
want to raise is this: Why haven't we had a 
university- wide debate, not just over the 
merit* of this proposal, but over the viable 
alternatives to promote cosmopolitanism in 
our students? 



Part of a liberal education is learning to 
feel more comfortable in the wider world, 
but will a required course on some aspect of 
diversity truly help us attain that goal? 

Laurie Bagby 

assistant professor/political science 

► EllCTtOHS 

Here's one person who doesn't 
like Marlett's sense of humor 

Dear Editor, 

The recent events surrounding the student 
elections have revealed the case with which 
racist humor is resorted, stripping away a 
superficial veneer of respectful behavior. 

I call this superficial behavior political 
correctness?for P.C. has no depth. 1 am 
angered by the Collegian depiction of -Shanta 
Bailey in a recent cartoon. Your staff seems 
intent on taking the focus off its own com- 
plicity in turning the election into a shambles. 

A dignified apology for your own mis- 
takes would not include pointing the finger 
at one individual and attempting to make her 
a laughing stock and scapegoat. 

This act might temporarily make some 
feel smug and superior. 

Making one black woman somehow 
responsible for the election problems is both 
racist and misogynistic. Neither is funny. 
Neither is acceptable. 

Margaret Mara 
instructor/women's studies 



Truth about 




missing 
in arguments 



On Fridays, I often 
read USA Today 
and eat a 
Twinkie™. Vm not sure 
why. Both are light, fluffy, 
cream-filled, kind of gross 
and really had for you. 

Call it a habit. Anyway, this past 
Friday I nearly choked on my 
Twinkie™. One story ran on the 
front page with this first paragraph: 

"Seven tobacco executives raised 
their right hands and swore to 
Congress that cigarettes are no more 
addictive than Twinkles™." 

My first thought was that I 
should lay off the Twinkies™, It 
had been my understanding for a 
long time that cigarettes were terri- 
bly addictive. 

I read on and found a quote from 
Rep. Thomas Bliley, R-Va., who 
said, "I'll be damned if they (the 
tobacco companies) are to be sacri- 
ficed on the altar of political cor- 
rectness." 

1 have a certain amount of sym- 
pathy for this statement. I'm a non- 
smoker, usually, and I don't like 
being smoked out of public places. 
My childhood asthma attacks ended 
about the same time my dad quit 
smoking. 

Even so, I think smokers have 
been taking some pretty severe 
bashing lately. Every business 
wants to jump on the non-smoking 
bandwagon, banning smoking in the 
workplace as well as in restaurants 
like McDonald's (if you call that a 
restaurant). 

The Clinton administration is 
considering a 75-cent "sin" tax on 
cigarettes as a way to pay for his 
health-care plans. And folks have 
been accusing the tobacco compa- 
nies of spiking the levels of nicotine 
in cigarettes to hook smokers even 
worse. 

As 1 said, I'm not a big fan of 
cigarettes. But all this seemed a lit- 
tle harsh to me. Just because it is in 
fash ion. politically, in tx: anti-tobac- 
co doesn't mean smokers don't 
have some rights. 

In fact, several recent polls, 
including one by CNN/Gallup, have 
pointed out that even non-smokers 
are against smoking bans. I'm one 
of these people. 1 supported Student 
Body President Ed Skoog's push to 
get smoking back in the K-State 
Union. 

It would seem thai, as with other 
drug legislation, the government 
doesn't really have its finger on the 
pulse of the nation, but instead has 
its boot on the nation's jugular. 

Smokers have rights, too, just 
like the rest of us with disgusting 
habits. (I'll admit it, I have a 
Twinkie™ problem.) 

Tobacco companies, on the other 
hand, may be truly evil. 

Oh, the rational part of me says 
they aren't any worse than other 
major companies (just above toe 
jam on the morality scale), but the 
remark about the Twinkie™ addic- 




JASON 

Hamilton 



lion annoyed me. 

Furthermore, in the same issue 
of USA Today, Philip Morris USA, 
the makers 
of Marlboro 



cigarettes, 
ran a really 
big ad on 
page six. 

In this ad, 
Philip 

Morris print- 
ed, "FACT: 
Philip 

Morris does 
not believe 
cigarette 
smoking is 
addictive." 
Ha! I've 
seen my 

roommates trying to quit smoking. 
They start shaking like Jello™ in an 
earthquake. 

"People can and do quit smoking 
all the time," the ad went on. 
Alcoholics can and do quit drinking 
all the time, too. It seems that the 
tobacco folks are playing fast and 
loose with the term "addictive." 

I am sort of suspicious of anyone 
saying anything about any drug 
these days because propaganda is 
rampant about marijuana and other 
drugs. So, I don't want to just 
assume that anything that I thought 
I knew about cigarettes is true. 

But, in fact. I was right. After 
some very brief research, I redis- 
covered the government study that 
rated nicotine to be more addictive 
than heroin. The withdrawal isn't as 
dangerous, but it is easier to get 
addicted. 

It isn't just the government study 
that says so, either. In fact, it seems 
every study that isn't funded by a 
tobacco company turns up the same 
sorts of results. Isn't that odd? 

It really, really pisses me off that 
the tobacco companies are lying to 
us about cigarettes, as much or 
more lhan the beer companies lying 
to us about marijuana and LSD. 

I certainly don't want to endorse 
the ignorant bashing of tobacco, or 
to ride the crest of the politically 
correct wave against smoking. 

What I want is for people to 
know the truth, whatever it may be, 
about alt popular drugs, from alco- 
hol to Valium, and from tobacco to 
pot. 

It's really hard to find out these 
truths in the intellectual climate 
today, and I would recommend dis- 
trusting any facts you find in a 
newspaper, including any I have 
haphazardly researched for this col- 
umn. 

I'm hoping alcohol and tobacco 
both get moved to the jurisdiction 
of the Federal Drug Administration. 

While the FDA is not the most 
efficient department of our fine 
government (which is saying quite a 
bit), it might lead to some more 
objective thought about these drugs. 

In the meantime. I'm going to 
quit eating Twinkies™. If I can. 

Jaaon Hamilton i« a junior In English. 



MARLETT'S WORLD 







IT IS 




\ THE HOH-OfTPlSNE CmoC^\ 



rAtertr . 



» 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



p* 



Monday, April 18, 1094 



Finney vetos Sunday liquor-sales bill 



cott*rw 

A bill that would give a 
statewide county option for liquor 
salei on Sunday was vetoed 
Thursday by Governor Joan Finney, 

Sen. Lana Oleen, R- Manhattan, 
said the bill started out involving 
sales with credit cards. 

The bill passed in the Kansas 
Legislature. 

"Three different bills were 
passed in the Senate, and once they 
made the house, they were com- 
bined into one," Oleen said. 

The three bills included Sunday 
sales, sales on elections and credit- 
card sates. 

"Businesses like the Fields of 
Fair Winery, which is located on 
the interstate, wanted travelers to be 
able to pay with credit cards," 
Oleen said, 

"It was a hassle for the customer 
to pay for food and gas with a credit 
card and with cash for wine. 

Many people don't travel with 
cash on them, and some businesses 
don' I take checks," she said. 



Oleen said other businesses, 
such as convenience stores, weren't 
abiding anyway. 

"Some were allowing customers 
to put beer on credit cards because 
they didn't know it was illegal," 
Oleen said. 

Oleen also said ignorance of the 
law had a tot to do with the election 
day portion of the bill. 

The vetoed bill would make 
liquor sales legal on all election 
days. 

"The old bill said it was illegal 
to sell alcohol on Federal election 
days, but some counties thought 
this included all elections, like 
school bond elections," Oleen said. 
"In counties with more than one 
school, alcohol was being served in 
one place and not another. 

"The ABC asked that there be 
some consistency on election day." 

One local liquor store owner said 
passage of the bill would have come 
as quite a shock to many in the 
business. 

"This would have moved Kansas 
up 10 or IS years in time." said 
Kent Dean, owner of Dean Liquor. 



"We look forward to the utiliza- 
tion of credit cards," Dean said. 
"We've already been checking into 
rates." 

Dean wouldn't comment on 
whether his store would have been 
open on Sundays but said he didn't 
see it as being a big windfall. 

"Paying the overhead to keep the 
store open on Sunday might be a 
hindrance," Dean said. "People are 
used to buying on Friday and 
Saturday anyway." 

Don Bird, vice president for 
Kansans for Life at its Best, said he 
feels the majority of citizens are 
against the sale of liquor on Sunday 
and that his organization was sur- 
prised by the lack of public hearings 
on the floor of the Legislature. 

'That Sunday sales addition was 
a last-minute surprise," Bird said. 
"It surprised a lot of people, so it 
didn't get much opposition." 

Bird was concerned that allow- 



ing the sale of alcohol during the 
week's peak crime period would 
only increase instances of violent 
crime. 

"Substance abuse is the No. I 
problem in America," Bird said "A 
lot of crime takes place between 
Friday night and Monday morning, 
and it's a poor step to embrace loos- 
er rather than tighter standards." 

Bird also said the addition of 
beer talcs on credit cards in conve- 
nience stores would have increased 
the occurrences of drunken driving. 

"There is opposition by some 
folks concerning the mixture of gas 
and alcohol," Bird said. 

Had the bill passed. Bird said his 
organization hadn't discussed a 
large-scale initiative to keep liquor 
out of the different counties. 

"We weren't real excited about 
going out and keeping Sunday 
liquor sales out of I OS counties," 
Bird said. 



Workshop offers students 
chance to drink, see effects 



CoUeaiM 

Cruisin' and Boozin', an alco- 
hol awareness workshop, will 
allow students to view the effects 
alcohol has on the senses tonight 
at 7 p.m. in Forum Hall. 

Barb Robel. director of Greek 
Affairs, said the workshop was 
coordinated by several campus 
organizations such as Greek 
Affairs, Housing and Dining 
Services and Student Services in 
conjunction with the Riley 
County Attorney's Office and the 
Kansas Highway Patrol. 

"We wanted to help people 
understand and have a visual 
idea of the loss of judgment after 
drinking," Robel said. 

About five student leaders 
from each of the student organi- 
zations sponsoring the event will 
have a sobriety test performed on 
them after reaching a blood alco- 
hol content of .10. 

The selected drinkers are both 



male and female, Robel said. 

The students will begin drink- 
ing at the Ramada two hours 
before the workshop begins. 

They will be driven to Forum 
Hall and then given tests to show 
how much their motor skills have 
declined. 

"At .08, a lot of people who 
drink to that level realize they 
can't drive, and at . 10 they begin 
to revert back to the idea that 
they can drive," Robel said. 

Jarrod Fish, junior in finance, 
will be one of the drinkers for the 
workshop. 

He is representing Greek 
Affairs. 

"At first I thought it would be 
easy," Fish said. 

"I think they have it set up so 
no one can win." 

Fish said he thinks the event 
will have a large turn-out. 

"I've heard a lot of people 
talk about it." he said. 

"You can imagine how enter- 
taining it will be." 



BRT WANTED: 5»T 

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to apply for 
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the best call- 1b talk radio show lit Manhattan!! 




Applications are available a I the 

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or at 

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Application i are due by 5:00 pm April 29, 1994. 

Possible class credit for those who are selected. 

And don't forget to listen this Monday Night from 8-9 pm 



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COMMITTEE MEMBERS 



Six posMons available for 1994-95 

academic year. Obtain application forms 

from SGA office, Union, or Director's 

office, Lafene Health Center, Rm 222. 

Applications must be returned to Lafene 

Director by 5 p.m., Friday, April 29, 1994. 



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103 



Parents lie about death of infant 



NEW YORK — A Quebec 
couple who claimed their 2- 
month-old daughter disappeared 
in Central Park admitted Sunday 
they had dumped her body in 
woods in Quebec more than a 
week ago after rinding her dead 
in her crib. 

Using a map the couple drew 
for detectives. Quebec police 
quickly found the body. The 
cause of death wouldn't be 
known before an autopsy 
Monday, provincial police repre- 
sentative Tom McConnetl said. 

The discovery ended a search 
involving about 75 New York 
City police, including scuba 
divers who checked ponds in 
Central Park, said John Hill, 
chief of Manhattan detectives. 



The father had reported the 
infant missing Saturday after- 
noon — 18 hours after she sup- 
posedly disappeared. 

The couple drove to New 
York with their other child, 4- 
year-old Priscille, who showed 
no signs of abuse. Hill said. The 
girl was sleeping Sunday after- 
noon in a police station but 
would be turned over to city wel- 
fare officials, he said. 

The parents — Helene 
Lemay, 31, and her husband, 
Joseph Bales, 33, met with 
reporters at the station house late 
Saturday and made a tearful plea 
for the return of their infant girl, 
Muguet. 

Within several hours, the par- 
ents' story unraveled. First the 
mother, then the father, admitted 
what really happened. Hill said. 




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PORTS 




ROYALS SWEEP CLEVELAND 

CLEVELAND {AP} -Kevin Appier pitched sever innngs Sunday as the Kansas City 
Royals beat the Cleveland InrJans 8-3 lor their fourth strslght win. Rookie designatad 

hitter Bob HameBn homered and doubled, driving in three runs and has eight RBI in his 
last two games. Kansas City, which had lost five of its first six games, completed a 
three-game sweep and evened its record at 5-5. 



APRIL 18, 1994 



Huskers sweep up Cats 



CMbs*N 

LINCOLN, Neb. — The final game 
of the five-game series between K- 
State's and Nebraska's baseball teams 
ended in another football-like score. 

The Corn huskers beat the Wildcats 
23-14 at Buck Beltzer Stadium on 
Sunday, and with the 4-2 win on 
Friday and a 7-6 victory on Saturday, 
Nebraska got its first sweep against a 
Big Eight foe since 1988. 

Nebraska won its 10-siraight game 
to move to 24-16 overall, and 8-7 in 
the conference. K -Stale lost its ninth- 
consecutive game falling to 1 1 -28, 2- 
14 in the Big Eight. 

K-State coach Mike Clark said the 
Nebraska offense did a great job 
against his team. 

"The pitchers never gave us a 
chance to get into the ballgame," Clark 
said. "They were flitting where we 
weren't. It was just one of those days." 



The 23 runs and 19 hits by the 
Comhuskers was their best offensive 
effort this year, and the most runs at 
Buck Beltzer by one team since 
Nebraska hammered New Orleans, 28- 
21 in 1988. 

For the Cats, it was the most runs 
given up since losing to Oklahoma 
State, 24-4 last season. 

K- State got one run in the first 
inning before Nebraska came back 
with three runs in the bottom half. The 
Huskers added two more runs in the 
second inning to send K-State starter 
Adam Novak back to the dugout. 

Mike Gardner and Tim Decker got 
back-to-back walks, and were able to 
score on Ryan Bucll's single. After a 
Jay Kopriva double, Dave Hendrix 
ground out to the second baseman to 
score Buell and advance Kopriva to 
third. Kopriva crossed the plate on a 
sacrifice fly from Matt Miller to tie the 
game. 



Nebraska answered by sending 14 
batters to the plate and scoring nine 
runs to take the lead for good. 

The six-straight hits was one short 
of a Big Eight record of seven hits. 
Nebraska might have tied the record if 
Rob Merriman, who replaced Voos, 
didn't hit a Cornhusker batter. 

K-State gained a run in the fourth 
inning, but Nebraska responded with 
five runs to lead 19-8. 

The Cats would outscore the 
Cornhuskers 6-4 for the last five 
innings, but it wasn't enough. 

Voos got the loss and went 0-1 for 
the season. Chris Bauer pitched three 
innings for the win to go to 2-0. 

On Friday, A I vie Shepherd (1-3) 
gave up three hits and two runs to K- 
State as Nebraska won, 4-2. Jon Oiseth 
(4-6) struck out six batters. 

K-State led 6-1 after two innings in 
Saturday's game, but Nebraska 
chipped away at the margin, taking the 



CATS DIAMOND DATA R 


Nebraska 


329 


503)01 


23 


19 


K-State 


106 


102|400 14 


12 


3 


K-State Wildcats Nebraska Comhuskers 


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Burt , J-S 2 Z Brohtwn 
Kopit* 6 2 1 Strtnw 


UKH Ml 


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lead in the bottom of the eighth inning. 
The Comhuskers went on to win 7-6.- 

Buell, who got on base four times, 
said the team's motivation would be a 
key ingredient in a turnaround. 

"The biggest thing is to believe we 
can win," Buell said. "We have to play 
like a team to win. We have to have 
everybody show up and be ready to 
play." 



Heads 
up 

K-Stateand 
Colorado tocc*r 

players work for 
the ball during the 
Cat*' 1-0 tost to 
the Buffalo**. 
With the Iom, the 
Cat*, two-tlma 
defending 
champion* , did 
not advance to 
the second round. 



CoUaglaii 




Soccer team misses 
championship three-peat 



CoUtpm 

The Cats couldn't find the net 
Saturday afternoon during the Big Eight 
Conference Soccer Tournament. 

K-State, the two-time defending title 
champion, did not advance to the second 
day's events. 

K-State played in three games 
Saturday at the tournament, which was 
held at the Anneberg Sports Complex in 
Manhattan. 

The Cats tied the first game against 
Iowa State, 1 - 1 . During the second game, 
the Cats were unable to score and fell 1 - 
to Oklahoma State. 

The third game of the day was against 
Colorado. Because of the scoring system 
used in the tournament for advancing to 
the second round, the Cats needed to 
defeat the Buffs by two goals. 



The goals scored by K-State, for 
example, are compared to its opponents* 
total to judge whether the Wildcats 
would advance against the other mem- 
bers of the bracket. 

Despite K-State's coach Viktur 
Atughonu's emphasis on the offense, the 
Cats lost 1-0. 

"We had to win by two to advance, 
and we didn't," Atughonu said after the 
loss to the Buffaloes. 

"I tried to play more offense, because 
we knew we needed two goals." 

The offensive pressure by the Cats 
may have been hampered by the long 
day of games and 80 degree tempera- 
tures. 

The only score of the game came 10 
minutes into the second half when 
Colorado's Dan Schaefer found the hole 
in the goal. Schaefer was given an unob- 




TWo K-State 
players react to 

• misted 
open-goal shot 
late In the second 
half of the gam*. 
It they had 
scored, the Cats 
would have tied 
the game. 

DARMM WHITLIY 

Collegian 



strucled shot after K-State fouled 
Colorado. 

With the win, Colorado advanced to 
the next round of the tournament. 

"I was worried," Colorado coach 
Milan Misuta said. 

"We tried to just play for the tie. That 
was enough for us to advance." 

The defensive concentration on the 
pan of the Buffs forced K-State to ran a 
more risky offense. The Cats were not 



able to capitalize on several opportuni- 
ties when they had the bait within the 
goalie box. 

"We were the two-time defending 
champ on this, which we gave up today," 
Atughonu said. 

"We just couldn't finish today. 

"Colorado was the best team we've 
played so far." 

K-State still has one more tournament 
to play in next week. 



Drought continues for netters 



ate's women!* tennis 
in into a bulzsaw on 



CrtkfbB 
K-Stat< 

team rai 

Sunday and things aren't going 

to be any easier today. 

The netters lost their fifth- 
straight match on Sunday, this 
lime to Oklahoma State, 9-0. 
This was the sixth time this sea- 
son that the Wildcats have been 



shut out and dropped their record 
to 4-16, 1-5 in the conference. 

The netters aren't getting' 
down on the loss, though. They 
are looking at it as an experience 
that will help get them ready for 
the conference tournament. 

"It is good experience in 
preparation for the Big Eight 
Tournament next week," 
Summer Ruckman said. 



In No. I singles, Ruckman 
dropped her match to Mercedes 
Fernandez, 6-3. 6-0. Nikki 
Lagerstrom dropped her No. 3 
singles match, 6-2. 6-0. Marline 
Shrubsole and Brooke Brandigc 
won the most games, but the 
results were the same. Shrubsole 
lost in No. 2 singles,' 6- 3, 6-2 and 
Brandtge lost in No. 4 singles, 6- 
4.6-1. 



Oklahoma State breezed 
through the doubles competition 
losing only one game. 

Shrubsole and Lagerstrom fell 
to Fernandez and Carolina 
Hadad. 6-0, 6-0 in No. 1 doubles. 

Ruckman and Brandtge won 
the sole doubles game for the 
Cats, but they still were over- 
powered by Jackie Gunthrop and 
Kim Hazzaxd. 6- 1, 6-0. 

For the ninth-straight match, 
the Cats were forced to default 
due to a shortage of healthy play- 
ers. 



The netters forfeited in No. 5 
and No. 6 singles along with No. 
3 doubles* costing them three 
points in the match. 

Despke the score, Coach 
Steve Bietau is pleased with the 
resiliency of his squad 

"They are doing the best that 
they can to Jiang in there and 
compete the best that they can," 
Bietau said. 

Today the netters are in 
Norman, Okla.. facing an 
Oklahoma Sooner squad that is 
ranked No. 31 nationally. 



I ATE COLLEGIA ! 



OUTDOOR TRACK 



Good weather 
helps propel 
NCAA qualifiers 



Coach Cliff Rovelto and the K-State 
track team finally received what it needed 
most — nice weather. 

K-State added more NCAA-provisional 
qualifiers at Norman, Okla., Saturday at the 
John Jacobs Invitational. 

"At this point in the season, if we get 
some decent weather, the times are going 
to come down," Rovelto said. 

Dennis Nelson was the first to add his 
name to the list of qualifiers when he sur- 
passed the provisional mark in the javelin 
with a throw of 226 feet, 8 inches. 

"I feel the weather helped a lot," Nelson 
said. "If it weren't for a little head wind, I 
think it would have gone farther. I felt good 
today." 

The effort bettered Nelson's personal 
best by more than six feet. 

Kristen Schulu completed the sweep of 
the event by taking first with a throw of 
153'8". Schultz's twin sister, Kirsten 
Schultz, came in fourth with a throw of 
147' 1". 

"It works good for us training together," 
Kristen Schultz said. "We help each other 
out when we compete together." 

The javelin wasn't the only successful 
event for the Wildcats. Chris Pryor and 
Nicole Green took both 400-meter titles. 

Pryor captured first place with a time of 
46.7 seconds, which eclipsed the provision- 
al time. 

"I just tried to relax and get out hard," 
Pryor said. 

Pryor added a fourth-place finish in the 
200 meters with a time of 2 1.7. 

"He is capable of running those kind of 
times consistently." Rovelto said. 

Green performed a double of her own 
by capturing both the 400 meters and the 
200 meters with times of 53.5 and 23.3. 

"I prayed and I dreamed for some good 
weather and we finally got it," Green said. 

Green has now run provisional qualify- 
ing standards in both the 200 and the 400 
meters. 

"I thought it was going to be rough 
today," Green said. "I won easier than I 
thought I would." 

Rovelto said there was some outstand- 
ing sprinters present at the meet, which 
made Green's dominance even more 
impressive. 

Another first-place finish for the Cats 
was earned by Dante McGrew in the triple 
jump. 

However, McGrew' s jump of 51 '3" was 
not as impressive as some of his earlier 
jumps, Rovelto said. 

"He really didn't jump very well," 
Rovelto said. "It shows how much talent he 
has when he doesn't jump well and still 
wins." 

Irma Betancourt captured a third-place 
finish in the 800 meters with a time of 
2:16.19. 

The race was her first since injuring her 
back during the cross country season. 

Verida Walter found a third-place finish 
in the 100-meter hurdles with a time of 
14.33. 

"She is starting to ran well after having 
a few injuries," Rovelto said. 

Francis O'Neill's career at K-State is 
over, Rovelto said. O'Neill did not meet 
academic requirements and had to be dis- 
missed from the team. 

"He didn't meet his academic responsi- 
bilities," Rovelto said. "It was really out of 
our hands.'.' 

O'Neill competed in the 1,500 meters 
Saturday unattached. 




K-SuAtt roemo earn competed 9*s i 

nfe Great f^n^c^Cnm^kiMt^^i 

Shawnee In Topes*. The meni r women i 

junior team, elvcn coneisti ot high school i 

dene, each competed in lie meet 

feattanastalcwK 
B Mtrf s noMce eight — IW pace 
B Junto* taw's lour — Rm and fourm-ptace 
a Junior vanity men* eidH-touti pace 
a Junior women* tour -tart place 
B Men'snottee lour -fourth place - 

Ittbnw'iqMeiAj^eW-louftplu 
a Aimni team oriejsiing of graduates! 

and earlier -two" pace 

B Washburn won first and second place In the 

atoanfrace. 

The team* wi next compete at the Mtdwaat 
Cc*egtaaRcwi^Chanv<or^»whchwit»h 
two weeks. 

TtaCtarT^sfiip»^bainliftadiion,W». 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



..mw i o- Mt.. ,^m»«- .■ ,T^««iy«ti 



in i ' in ih 



Monday, April 18, 1M4 y 



Cities begin 
new building 
moratorium 
for 1994 



OVERLAND PARK — the 

city and developers are argu- 
ing about who should pay for 
new roads in this rapidly 
growing suburb. 

The dispute is being 
watched closely by other 
growing Kansas towns. 

Overland Park declared a 
temporary moratorium on new 
residential and commercial 
construction this week after 
developers filed lawsuits 
against the city. 

Developers say Overland 
Park and Leawood for years 
have violated a stale law that 
requires cities to pay for thor- 
oughfares from general funds. 

City officials in both 
Overland Park and Leawood 
say another section of the law 
allows cities to assess property 
owners for road improvements 
next to their land. 

Two of the suits filed by 
developers name Overland 
Park and two name Leawood. 
A judge is expected to rule on 
two of the suits early next 
month. 

"I am sure that we are 
going to watch what happens 
up there closely," said Dale 
Miller of the Wichita- 
Sedgwick County 
Metropolitan Area Planning 
Department. "We have been 
trying to clarify how we pay 
for major roads and capital 
improvement programs for 
some time now." 

Under the moratorium, no 
new residential or commercial 
plans can be filed through the 
rest of the year if they abut an 
unimproved thoroughfare. An 
unimproved thoroughfare is a 
-road that hasn't reached its 
ultimate width. 

Other cities, and the 
League of Kansas 
Municipalities, are watching 
the main Overland Park law- 
suit closely, hoping for a quick 
compromise so growth isn't 
affected. 

"We're hoping for a quick 
resolution of this case because 
it does have far-reaching 
implications for growing com- 
munities like Olathe," said 
Charley Vogt, economic 
development director of the 
Olathe Area Chamber of 
Commerce. 



WWII era alumni reunite at K-State 



CMtpa 

A special reunion 
was held last 
week during 
K-State 
Reunions Days for those 
who started their K- 
State education in 1940. 

"The freshman that started in 
1940 and 1941 were involved in the 
war. Some graduated on an accel- 
erated program in 1943, some grad- 
uated on time in 1944, and some 



went to the war and graduated after 
the war," Becky Klingler. director 
of the K-State Alumni 
Association's constituent programs, 
said. 

One returning alumnus graduat- 
ed on the accelerated program and 
then went to World War II. 

"I entered in 1940 as a freshman, 
and the outbreak of World War II 
on December 7, 1941, changed the 
plans of many students." Howard 
Johnstone, 1943 graduate in agri- 
culture, said. 

"When the war broke out, some 
continued their education and 
involvement in ROTC," he said. 

The original ROTC program was 



designed so that upon graduation 
students would be commissioned in 
some branch of the military, but due 
to World War II thai program was 
discontinued, Johnstone said. 

In the spring of 1943 those tak- 
ing advanced ROTC were advised 
that they could accelerate their aca- 
demic program and receive their 
degree before going on to active 
service in the military, he said 

"Since I was in ROTC. I took 
advantage of this offer. I took sum- 
mer school in 1943, and graduated 
with a bachelor of science in agri- 
culture in September of 1943." 
Johnstone said. 

Johnstone helped organize the 



reunion for the freshmen of 1940, 
Klingler said. 

K-State Reunion Days offered 
alumni the opportunity to eat lunch 
with representatives of their col- 
leges, take campus lours, and eat 
lunch with their graduating classes. 

Some of the tours available to 
alumni were Bramlagc Coliseum, 
the College of Veterinary Medicine 
and the Center for Basic Cancer 
Research. 

"I saw the first and last ball 
games played ih Aheam," L. Dean 
Holthus. 1954 graduate in agricul- 
ture, said on his tour of the College 
of Veterinary Medicine. 

The Student Alumni Board also 



assists with campus tours, partici- 
pates with luncheons, and serves as 
student representatives to alumni, 
Todd Johnson, senior in agricultural 
economics, said. 

"Alumni can gain a student's 
perspective of what it is like to be 
on campus now, as compared to 
that many years ago," Johnson said. 

K-State Reunion Days were held 
Thursday and Friday to recognize 
the classes of 1944, 1949, 1954, the 
freshman class of 1940, and the 
Golden K Club. 

"By attending reunions, they are 
exhibiting their love for K-State 
because they graduated a long time 
ago," Johnson said. 



California dairies eyeing southwest Kansas 



LIBERAL — Scores of 
California dairy farmers are consid- 
ering moving to southwest Kansas. 

The right climate, the availabili- 
ty of feed grain and access to high- 
ways are some of the reasons that 
are attracting them. 

Melvin Brose, dairy commis- 



sioner for Kansas with the state 
Department of Agriculture, said as 
many .as 300 California farms have 
been rumored to be looking to 
move to Kansas. 

"There are a lot of dairies look- 
ing to expand," Brose said. 
"They're finding a sleeper in south- 
west Kansas." 

Liberal and southwest Kansas 



aren't considered a hotbed of dairy 
production, but Californians are 
working to change that. 

Pete Tuls and his brother. Todd, 
are expanding their family's dairy 
business into southwest Kansas 
from San Jacinto, Calif. Kansas' 
largest dairy, north of Liberal, will 
open June I with 2,400 head of cat- 
tfe. 




PHI BETA KAPPA 
KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 

INITIATES - SPRING 1994 
Initiation: April 22, 1994 



Linda Eileen Arthington 
Scott Robert Baker 
Jennifer Ann Barmann 
Ian Brent Bautista 
Aaron Dean Bohrer 
Christine Theresa Changho 
Victoria K. Choitz 
Brandon Scott Clark 
Shannon Patrick Curran 
Dina Marie Dettinger 
Lory Lynn Eggers 
Camilla Ruth Forahay 
Angela Marie Franson Bigler 
Trevor David Hartman 
Lori Ann Hellebusch 
Jill Marie Holt 
Angelia Jeanette Kallenbach 
Sara Kathaleen Keams 
Joan Elaine Leep 



Christine E. LeGrand 
RaeAnne Leiker 
Corey Lee Lewis 
Patric Shane Linden 
Robert Justin Losey 
William Zachary Mills 
Christopher Lynn Nelson 
Lisa Kaye Pierce 
John Karl Pruner 
Scott T. Rottinghaus 
Timothy Brian Schultz 
Julie Ann Sellers 
Lynn Warner Seyter 
Teresa Diane Shippy 
Andrianna Smith 
Rachel E. Smith 
Jocelyn Susanne Vitema 
Corey Matthew Werner 



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Q Monday, April 18, 1994 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



REVIEW i 



Woman's life not as pretty as a 'Doll house 



Cdtafln 

Touring group 

offers spin on play 
with young actors 

The strong, feminist messages in 
Henrik Ibsen's play, "A Doll 
House," were reason enough to 
come out of the splendid Sunday 
afternoon weather and into McCain 
Auditorium. 

The Acting Company,' a profes- 
sional touring group started in 
I972, brought "A Doll House" to 
Manhattan as part of their 1993-94 
national tour. 

The Company employs young 
actors in need of experience. 

"A Doll House" is the controver- 
sial 1 879 play about the painful life 
of a simple housewife. 

Nora Helmer has borrowed 
money falsely (she forged her 
father's signature on the promissory 
note) in order to pay for a trip to 
Italy for herself and her husband, 
Torvald. 

When the loaner comes knock- 
ing, Nora panics. 

She can't tell Torvald because 



that would crush him. 

However, when he finds out. 
Nora has decided that the best thing, 
for her to do is to leave him and her 
children. 

She thinks of him as a stranger. 
She realizes that she has had no per- 
sonal identity of her own. So, she 
leaves her home in search of self- 
realization. 

There were some very passionate 
performances in the show. Kate 
Forbes, as Nora Helmer, was very 
accomplished. 

She rambled about her home 
aimlessly, yet always had the sense 
that she was enraptured with deep 
thought. 

The character of Nora is a hope- 
lessly depressing one. Having lied 
to her husband and borrowed 
money behind his back, she feels 
uncomfortable around him. 

Forbes was practically the only 
member of the company that really 
understood her character. 

There is so much behind Nora's 
eyes. Forbes demonstrates the 
depression, the yearning, and the 
uneasiness of Nora's life. It was all 
churning inside Forbes. 

Nora's only confidante is her 



childhood friend, Kristine. Claudia 
Fielding, playing Kristine, overact- 
ed herself to no end. 

Her characterization was thor- 
oughly unappealing. There was 
simply nothing to her, save a 
monotonous, whiny voice. 

What was most surprising was 
her unnaturalness on the stage. 
Having graduated from the Yale 
School of Drama (a leading drama 
school), you would think she might 
be able to overcome the high* 
schoolcsque, inexperienced quality 
that a lot of actors fight with. 

Jonathan Wade, as Torvald 
Helmer, was satisfactory. His per- 
formance lacked surprises and a 
touch of warmth. 

Did he really think Nora as his 
"little songbird?" Wade simply did 
not delve into Torvald's life. Is 
Torvald as shallow and boring as 
Wade would have you think? 

Drew McVety, who plays Nils 
Krogstad, a subordinate of 
Torvald's at work and the loaner of 
Nora's money, accomplished the 
better of the three male perfor- 



mances. 

His torment as a man fallen from 
grace (because of a past crime of 
forging documents) was so real. 
When he threatened Nora with 
revealing himself to Torvald, he 
was truly hateful. *• 

Then, when he takes a full rum 
and unites with Kristine, he 
becomes a very approachable char- 
acter. 

He finds himself with Kristine, 
perhaps a hint of what lies ahead for 
poor Nora. 

After all is said and done, what 
does happen to Nora? Does she 
make it on her own? Does she 
return home and build a new life for 
herself? 

Maybe she goes back to Torvald 
after a desperate attempt at indepen- 
dence. Many people have pondered 
that question. 

Some have even written sequels. 
Ibsen was probably posing these 
questions for the purpose of stirring 
thought about social issues in 1 879. 
Have we really progressed that far? 



Ellison gave readers a hand 
on the pulse of America 



NEW YORK — Now that 
Ralph Ellison is gone, his second 
novel still only a manuscript, he 
is in danger of being remembered 
by one or two unfortunate labels. 

He was a "black" writer, a 
chronicler of the "black experi- 
ence." He was a one-shot novel- 
ist, another Margaret Mitchell or 
Harper Lee. 

Nonsense. 

Ellison's book may have been 
written and narrated by a black 
man, but it was influenced by 
everyone from Twain to 
Dos (oc v sky, and it was addressed 
to all races. 

As far as completing just one 
novel, you could write a hundred 
books in the time it takes to 
exhaust the possibilities of 
"Invisible Man." 

"What he really wanted was 
to get a sense of the pulse of 
things in America," recalled John 



Callahan, an old friend of 
Ellison's and the dean of arts and 
humanities at Lewis & Clark 
College in Portland,' Ore. 

"Whatever jelse he is, Ellison 
would say, the true American is 
black. At the same time, he felt 
all Americans were white.' 
Ellison just felt things were 
mixed." 

Ellison died Saturday at age 
80, and a number of factors held 
up his second work of fiction. 

A manuscript was destroyed 
in a fire. Friends spoke of his 
impossibly high standards. 

The author himself said the 
assassinations of the 1960s, 
which seemed to mirror the worst 
nightmares of his novel, really 
chilled him and in turn slowed 
down his writing. 

"Invisible Man," published in 
1952, follows a nameless narra- 
tor's journey from campus life in 
the South to political activism in 
the North. 




J$) Wbmen't Cisualwtar /in Aagitvillc tf). 



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POSITION AVAILABLE 
Chancel Choir Director 

Starting Date: August 1, 1994 

Job Description Available at 539-8691 

SEND RESUME AND 3 LETTERS OF REFERENCE TO: 

First Baptist Church 
a 2121 Blue Hills Road a 

First Ba36 Church Mahaattw, KS 66502 f^iBbX 
BY APRIL 22. 1994 



Kit Church 




SEXUAL 

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Just as women do a breast self 

exam, men should do monthly 

testicular self exams to detect 

testicular cancer early. 

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FOR APPOINTMENT 




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service, whichever is greater. 

You'll also have training in a 
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the rest of your life. 

Get all the details from 
your Army Recruiter. 

CALL 776-8551 



ARMY. BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 



Dedication 

The 

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Healing the Planet 

featuring 

Mark ChcrringtoH 

of forthwatch 

Tuesday, April 19 
7:$0pin 
Uwberger Hall 105 

Kansas State University 




What will happen to the balance of life If rainforests 
disappear? How will we feed ourselves if the world's 
population continues to grow exponentially? How 
many species can we afford to lose before the Earth's 
ecosystems collapse? How can we repair our damaged 
planet? 

Even as you read this, there are scientists, researchers, 
and ordinary people working on the front lines of the 
world's most pressing environmental problems. As the 
editor of the international magazine tarthwatch, 
Mark Cherrington has worked wtth and written about 
hundreds of these projects In every part of the world. 
His slide show features reports from those front lines, 
showing that we can solve many of these problems 
wtth understanding of how the Earth works. 

Among the topics he addresses art... 

Rainforests Endangered Species 

Modal Warming Food Production 



Sponsored by_ 

KSU Rainforest Action •roup, CoHagc of 
Woc«tW Confer tor Science Education, U\) 
Young Pewocrati, Students for Peace S> 
JMhe, Morthem fHnt WU Audubon SooWy, 
SAVE, PMsJon of Wdoflv, KS Environmental 
Seminar Series. Pent, of Landscape 
Architecture and Regional ft Community 
PLwmlna Ptpt of *<ographv, WMrfi Society, 
and Ptpt. of Sociology, Anthropology, ft Social 
Work. Partially funded bv K$U Student 
•owning. Anode, Hon. 

for more information, contact Robert VYIion 

atffi'trei. 



U 



Printed on Recycled Paper 




WEEK'S UPC MOVIES 



> Fmtt* fftft MM - 1 pjn. . *x*y few* TTu^R^HHwlSp^Md^HilTh**^ 

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24 Formation 

28 Disinte- 
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32 Auto style 

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34 Intention 

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41 Fervid 
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history 
44 Novice 
48 Hindu 

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knights 
53 Alphabet 

start 
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58 Pizzeria 
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80 Finish up, 
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61 Carrot- 
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21 W Hemi- 
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23 Bikini half 

25 Object of 
worship 

26 Designate 

27 Estival 
pest 

26 Goya 
subject 

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protection 

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slangily 

45 Theater 
award 

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54 Cornfield 

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Without Double-Barreled, 
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kwfcw: AMOCfeM P«i» STEPHANIE FUOUA/Cotegian 

CALVIN AND HOBBES 



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Puzzled student wonders about mirrors, chameleons, speeding, G-spots 



Dear Cassie, 

I have been puzzled by several 
questions and feel that maybe you 
could shine some light into the dim 
chamber that I call my head. 

First, what color is a minor? 

Second, if you put a chameleon 
on a minor — what, color would it 
become? 

Third, if you travel down 
Interstate 70 at 2 a.m. for five miles, 
and there are no law enforcement 
officers recording this action, would 



you be guilty of speeding (a corol- 
lary to; if a tree falls in the forest?) 

Finally, the G-spot — fact or fic- 
tion? 

If you could answer these per- 
plexing questions of mine, then I 
could sleep (or drive) better at night. 

Too much time on my hands 

Dear Too much, 

A mirror is a piece of glass with 
a little bit of work. The back of the 



glass is coated with a layer of silver 
paint. The silver paint dries and is 
coated with black paint. 

A mirror reflects the image of 
anything that is put in front of it. 
For example, if you put a Jayhawk 
in front of a mirror, you will see a 
bird with short yellow feathers. 

As for the chameleon, I'm not 
sure what color it would be. The 
animal would probably be the same 
color as the creature in the mirror. 

The answer to the speeding ques- 



tion — yes, you would be guilty. 
But the fine is optional. 

Finally, is there a G-spot? The G- 
spot is supposed to be the epicenter 
of the erogenous zone for women. 
And yes, I believe there is one. 
Mine is in my freezer. I call it Tin 
Roof Sundae. 



Write to Cassandra 

116 Kadzla Hall 
Manhattan, Kan. 66506. 



British 
feminists 
decline debate 
invitation 



LONDON — Something 
about prominent femi- 
nists grates on the ears 
of British women. 
Mainly, it's the American 
accents. 

When the Sunday Times sponsored a debate 
about date rape, it invited Katie Roiphe, Naomi 
Wolfe and Erica Jong. Not a single British femi- 
nist accepted an invitation to appear. 

"We're not saying that we don't think that 
feminists like Roiphe, Wolfe and Jong are not 
good or don't have interesting things to say — 
but there is a tendency in the British media to see 
feminism as an American phenomenon," journal- 
ist and author Linda Grant said. 

"The problem is that you have these btg, loud 
American voices blanking out British voices. 
You don't get to talk about what is going on in 
this country here and now," said Grant, whose 
book "Sexing the Millennium" will be released 
in the United States in May. 

The Americans were all bona fide stars: 

— Jong rose to fame after "Fear of Flying" 
was published in 1973. 

— Wolfe gained prominence for her attack on 
the fashion industry in "The Beauty Myth." 

— Roiphe grabbed the public eye with her 
controversial critique of date rape, "The Morning 
After: Sex, Fear and Feminism on Campus." 

In this company. "British feminists would 
come out looking bad, looking dull and boring," 
journalist Melissa Bcnn said, one of the Britons 
who turned down an invitation. 

Even criticism of feminism comes with an 
American twang. Camille Paglia, the controver- 
sial academic and writer, was last sighted on 
Britain's Channel 4 in a half-hour salute to the 
male anatomy. 

Suzanne Moore, a feminist and columnist for 
the Guardian newspaper, said American femi- 
nists have created globalizing theories about 
women. 

But she said what is important to women in 
New York is not necessarily what matters to 
women in London. 

For one thing, American and British feminism 
have very different roots. 

In the United States, the women's liberation 
movement was very broad-based, focusing on 
political rights and equal opportunity at work. 

"European feminism has always been more 
concerned with social backup," writer and broad- 
caster Sarah Dunant said. 

In Britain, feminism has its roots in the social- 
ist movement and has focused on issues such as 
equal pay for women and preschool education. 

Grant said British feminists in the late 1970s 
tended to join the Labor Party, Britain's socialist 
party. "With the 1979 Labor Party defeat, the 
women's movement was marginalized along 
with the Labor Party," she said. 

It was small comfort for feminists thai Labor 
was beaten by Margaret Thatcher, because she 
had little sympathy for rjieir causes. 

A Gallup survey of 1 , 104 British women con- 
ducted in November found that 23 percent identi- 
fied themselves as feminists, while 70 percent 
rejected the label. 




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otw. co aosco 

i-KOMfrOMO 



KANSAS STATE 

Ofche^tfifA 



David Littrell, conductor 

Tuesday, April 19 

8:00 p.m. 

McCain Auditorium 

Free Admission 
Puccini 

"Nessun Donna!" from Turandot 
Ed Raines, tenor 

Liszt 

Piano Concerto No. 1 in E-flat Major 
Ynu Chung Yang, piano 

Rachmaninov 
Symphony No. 2 in e Minor 



•J f> Monday. ApHI 18. 1094 



KANSAS STA TE COLLEGIAN 




Feast part of one small world 



Collcitaii 

The world seemed to grow a bit smaller 
Saturday at International Night in the Manhattan 
Middle School as people from many different 
countries and cultures assembled for food, enter- 
tainment and celebration at the end of 
International Week. 

The evening began with the Edward King 
dinner, named for a contributor to the 
International Student Center. Poods from several 
different countries were served. 

The menu included Japae, a Korean noodle 
dish with mixed vegetables and beef, and a salad 
roll from Japan that was made from rice, sea- 
weed, crab meat and lettuce. German marble 
cake, Polish Spice cake and German Apple Pie 
were choices for dessert. 

After dinner, music, dance and fashions from 
different nations wore featured in a 2-1/2 hour 



show. The national flags that were on display in 
the Union during International Week lined the 
back of the stage. 

The show began with a fashion show featur- 
ing native dresses from India, Nigeria, the 
Polynesian Islands and Sierra Leone. Models 
danced on-stage to lively music while showing 
the clothing. 

Dances were performed by students from 
Thailand, Pakistan, Philippines, Africa, India 
and Europe. 

One American student, Haley Hoss, fifth -year 
senior in dance, received the rare chance to par- 
ticipate in a traditional Gujrati dance, called 
Raas. 

A week before the show, a dancer was going 
to be unable to perform. 

Smruti Patel, the group's choreographer, 
asked Hoss if she would like to perform. 

"I was very honored to be asked to be in a 



Community competes in writing 



IUUH HUamWColleeian 

Haobo Jiang, graduate student in biochemistry, selects s flag 
prior to the parade of flag* Saturday morning In City Park. 



The winners of the KSDB - 
FM 91.9 second annual poet- 
ry contest were announced 
Saturday at Internationa? 
Night. 

The poetry contest's 
theme was "One World Hand 
in Hand." 

The contest participants 



were divided into five 
groups: college, community, 
high school, middle school 
and elementary school. 

The winners in the college 
division were: first place, 
Britt Wagner, senior in 
mechanical engineering; sec- 
ond place: Darren 
Geimausaddle, senior in 
anthropology; and third 



place: Craig McLean, junior 
in fisheries and wildlife biol- 
ogy. 

"We had about 150 entries , 
that came into the station this 
year," Slacey Taylor, senior 
in business administration, 
said. 

"We received entries from 
all over the state and even 
one from Tennessee." 



traditional folk dance for a culture other than 
mine," Hoss said. From dancing in the show, she 
said she learned more about the Indian culture. 

"So many of us are so ethnocentric that we 
get so wrapped up in our own lives," Hoss said. 
"International night really put that in perspective 
for me." 

During the show, the awards for the second 
annual D892 Poetry Contest were presented. 
The theme of the contest used the theme of 
International Week, "One World Hand in Hand." 

About ISO entries were received from as far 
away as Wichita and Tennessee. 

Three winners were chosen in each of the five 
age groups. First -pi ace winners were awarded 
$25, while second-place winners received $15 
and third-place winners won $10. 

One of the reasons to have International 
Night was for international students to give back 
to the community, Kouassi Kouakou, graduate 
student in grain science and organizer for the 
event, said. 

"We expect to take people around the world 
at no cost," Kouakou said. "It's a trip around the 
world in food and performance." 

By sharing their culture through the evening's 
festivities, the students could give back to the 
community what they had taken, he said. 

Culture, Kouakou said, was the most power- 
ful weapon to bring people closer together in 
peace. 



Junction City mayor says closure rumors lack credibility 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

downsize or closure is unfound- 
ed. 

The media has put more 
questions in people's minds than 
there should be, Chris Heavey, 
general manager and leasing 
agent of the Manhattan Town 
Center and former president of 
the Board of Governors, said. 

"The media's frenzied feed on 
itself has no more depth or merit 
than it did 18 months ago. There 
are so many pluses with Fort 



Riley. Fort Riley is a great post. 
It has good delivery and great 
training facilities." 

It's foolish to listen to rumors, 
Robert Ritter, Junction City 
mayor, said. 

"They have no credibility." 

The whole matter needs to be 
kept in perspective, Roger 
Maughmer, Manhattan mayor, 
said. 

"Nobody's said Fort Riley's 
closing. Nobody's said there is 
going to be a substantial down- 
size. That decision is a long way 



off. There's nothing to gain by 
causing panic, but we do need to 
be concerned and aware. 
Absolutely." 

Jobs and lifestyles change 
with base closings. 

Jon Murdock, dealer and 
owner of Murdock Auto Mall in 
Manhattan, knows what it's like 
to face a base closure from a 
civilian perspective. 

In the late 50s, he and his 
family moved from Norman, 
Okla., where a base shut down. 
"It rocks a place back," 



Murdock said." Communities 
after a period of shock tend to 
get more involved in economic 
developments that make the 
community bounce back." 

"Life has to go on no matter 
what happens," he said. 

Dollars and cents aren't the 
only positive aspect of the base, 
Murdock said. 

"It's not just business, I've 
met lots and lots of great people. 
I'd hale to see them go," 
Murdock said. "I like my busi- 
ness to be on more of a personal 



basis than a transit one. That's 
the way I grew up. That's the 
way I want to keep it." 

Fort Riley is the largest elec- 
trical and gas customer for KPL, 
Stacy Kohlmeier, division man- 
ager, said. 

The base generates I percent 
of revenue, but Kohlmeier said 
the trickle-down effect of that I 
percent is significant. 

A lot of people depend on the 
base for business and if the base 
weren't there, these same people 
might be forced to leave. 



THE ECONOMICS 
OF FORT RILEY 

Fort Riley is the biggest KP&t customer in the 
(ri-state area. The fort also purchases nearly 
$75 million of Kansas goods and services, 
including nearly $65 million In supplies 
services and contracts, 

HOUSING SHARES 



Junction City 

27 percent ol housing in 
Junction City is attributed to 
soldiers. 



Manhattan 

10 percent of housing in 
Junction City is attributed to 
soldiers. 




SARA SWrTHCollegian 




LASSIFIEDS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



OUR BASIC RATI 

Tg run 30 words or MM tor an da* 
ti IS. For Meh word oyer 20 add lot 
par wont CM Mi tor conttcutJv* 
day ratos. 



MM ids mutt bt pteeed by 
en tht day otter* ths wfi the ad 
comma diaptey ads must bt 



placid by 4 p.m. two wortdno, days 
bttort tht daw. tht td runt. 



HOW TO RAY 

Al ctoMtfitdt mutt bt paM to 
tdvtnet untoM you htvt an 

♦srawteftad account wNn Studtnt 

Pubt^ltoni.CMii,chtct.lU»UjfC*d 

ofVlMtrti 



Call 532-6555 
to place your classified. 




OF THE 



OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 8 a.m. -5 p.m. |eicept holidays) 



MWTTliCOUiGuWttttS*^ 



000 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 



0101 



Announcement* 



■HOWARD STERNS" need- 
ed for co-host* or pro- 
duction staff petitions 
for ths talk— tsdio show 
"A Purple Affair.' Appli- 
cation* svailable at tha 
SGA Office or OB92 stu- 
dios (McCain 3171 

ADVANCED FLIGHT Train- 
ing. Multiangint pri- 
vate, commercial, or 
ATP in Twin Comanche 
with HSI, RMI, GPS, 
Storm Scop*. Hugh Ir- 
trin, 539 3128. 

AUGHI VIDEO Q AMIS. 

Buy- Mil- trade. Ninten- 
do- Sega- all system i. 
Gam* Guy 537-0989 
709 N. 12th, Aggleviile. 

COME FLV with us. K-Staie 
Flying Club ha* four air- 
plant*. For beat price* 
call Sam Knlpp, 539- 
6 1 93 after 5:30pm 

SEND EROTIC ttorit* to 
Dear Chria. If your 

story Is used in our col- 
umn, you can win $100 
Instantly. Mail (a Chria 
Robert. t503 Fairchild. 



Pound ads can be 
placed free) for three 



We require ■ form of 
picture ID IKSU, driv- 
er** license or othor) 
when placing a per 



AMY C - The time 1* el- 
moat here for you ten- 
lor*. We wish you tht 
bett of luck I Love AX 



AMY, WE appreciate all 
you've done lor K Slate 
and Alpha Oil. Best of 



luckl We'll miss you. 
AX love. Your sitters. 

ANGELIQUE, "CHANCE 
made us sisters, hearts 
made ua friends.* Best 
of luckl You'll bt 
misted when you're 
gontl Lovt, your AX 



AX AMY S - Your Senior 

year- The and I* near! 
You've done greet- 
Lat'* celebrate! Satur- 
day la Senior Blow, 
then we'll be sad to aaa 
you gol Congrats! AX 
Love, Your Sisters 

AX DENISE: Good Luck 
next year Wt're proud 
of you and wt'll miss 
youl AX Lovt, Your 
Sitter*. 

AX JEL. Thanks for the 
memorial, thank* for 
all tha fun. this la to say 
thanks for all you'v* 
dont. AX Lovt, Your 
Sisters 

AX KELLIE- Good luck tt 
KU Mtd. We always 
knew you were smart 
in tht head. AX Love, 
Youri 



AX MAURI. Congratula 

tiona on graduation I 
Good Luck- wt hops 
you got the jobl AX 
Lovt- Your S titers. 

AX NICOLE, Senior week I* 
finally here. Hope your 
week I* filled with 
chear. Alpha Chi Lovt, 
Your Sisters. 

AXQ CARRIE. Congratula- 
tions on graduating. 
We're all proud of your 
accomplishments You 
ware a great pre* ids nt 
and ■ great campus 
leeder. We're glad 
you're slicking around 
for another year. Wa 
lovt youl AX Lovt, 
Your Sitters 

CONGRATULATIONSI 

YOU have made tha big 
timaa at laat. You are 

qoing from the Little 
Apple to the Big Apple. 
Good luck. We will miss 
you. AX Love, Your 
3 (stars. 

KINDRA B Thenks for all 
you've done for AX - 
we're going to mitt 
youl Good luck- we 
with you tht bettl AX 
Lovt your Sisters 

LORI- BEST of luck to you 

with graduation and 
your fob teaching. We 
will miss you. AX Love. 
Your Sisters 

LORI- WE tre going to 
mite hiving your smile 



■roundl Good luck In 
■II that you dot AX 
Love Your Sisters. 

SUZANNE- WERE tad to 

tat you gol The bett of 
luck in everything you 
do end you will be 
misssdl AX Love, our 
Sitter*. 






GOLDEN KEY chtptar 
meeting Tuesday, 19th, 
tt 6 30pm in Union 
211. Pretldentlal Run- 
off Dtbete sponsored 
by Golden Key follow* 
tt 7:30p.m. In the Rig 8 
Room. 



CREATE HOT wet memo- 
ries with your next per 
SI. Wet -N Wild Mobile 
ot Tub Rental t. Year 

round availability 537 
1825. 



wo 



HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 



For Ren t- 
Apf 



AUGUST LEASE- next to 
campus, across Marian 
and Goodnow Hall 
IIB32 Clallin) one/ 
two-bedroom. 
539-2702 evenings/ 
message. 

AVAILABLE NOW, sum- 
mer tnd fill. Very nlct 
two, three tnd 
four-bedroom apart 
mint complexes tnd 
houta*. Near campus 
with great prlcea. 
537-1666, 537-2910 

FOR AUG Next to KSU. D* 
luxt two-bedroom 
apartment. I486. Pay 
only tltclrlc. 539-2482. 
after 4p.m. 

LARGE TWO and 

three-bedroom apart- 
ment* dot* to campus, 
Aggiaviiit tnd City 



Park. Aval libit June 1. 
539-1713. 

TWO, THREE tnd 

fou r-btdroom. Very 
good condition. Wind. 
ow tir, ges heal tnd 
carpeted. Available in 
June 637-7334 

TWO STORY duplex with 
patio. One tnd ont-hilf 
block* east ol Ford Hall, 
two full bathrooms. 
four oil street parking 
stalls. 1401 McCain 
$600 per month. 
539-7693. 

TWO BEDROOM, LUXURI- 
OUS ipartmentt netr 
Cimput and oppositt 
city ptrk it 1200 Fre- 
mont for June or Au- 
gust- Carpeted, central 
air, dishwasher tnd dis 
pottl. No pets $485 
5374428. 

UTILITIES PAID on tomt 

apartment! one or 
two-bedroom*, fur- 
nished Or unfurnished. 
10 or 12 month lease* , 
June or Aug. Quiet for 
study. No pet*. 
537-8389. 




Unfurntehed 



814 THURSTON Studio wt- 
(tr/ trtah paid. No pttt/ 
smokers June 1 lease. 
(270 Call 539-5138. 

AVAILABLE IMME 

C4ATELY, nice two-bed 
room, 617 N. 12th, 
1575. water, trash paid 
Close to c em pus. 778- 
3804 



AVGVST LEASES 

"ImwHil Apti ".SiMbdoAr A|rti 



Larer 2 Bmlmam Unlu 
537-9064 

Wrrk'layi V i.m. ■ 4; Y> |i.m. 



AVAILABLE JUNE 1. 
One-bedroom $340, 
two-bedroom $510 
1866 College Height! 
Wtttr/ trash paid. Close 
10 campus 778-3804. 

AVAILABLE NOW, 

one-btdroom. 1022 
Suniet. $345 Water/ 
trtah ptld. Close to 
campus 778-3804. 

AVAILABLE NOW, sum- 
mer and fall. Very ntct 
two, three and 

four-bedroom apart 
ment complexes and 



houats. Near campus 
with greet pricts. 
537-1666, 537-2919 

AVAILABLE NOW, 

three bedroom, close 
to City Park 300 N. 
11th. $435. Upstairs 
unit. Water/ traih paid. 
778-3604. 

AVAILABLE NOW, 

two-bedroom by City 
Part. 1026 Osage $495 
Water/ traih paid. 
778-3804. 

AVAILABLE MOW Spa 

cious two-bedroom. 
Close to campus. 1829 
College Height! $680 
Wtttr/ trash piid. 
776-3B04 



ROYAL 
TOWERS 

Apartments 

1700 N. Manhattan 

Now Leasing 
for June & August 

1 bedroom and 

4 bedroom / 2 bath 

$395 and $860 



Refrtgertt 
w/icernaksT, i 



.range, 
microwave & 



Resident Center with 

hot tubs, deck and 

lau nd romat. 

MODEL SHOWINGS; 

No Appotntmtn U Taktn 



TtMtalty * 1 1 em. 

TwirtHajr eVt tVIVt 
1 10- 1 1a.m. 



Ce to Leak Ml 2 
on north aide of • 




Dont mis* outl Call to- 
day' 776-3663. 

FOUR-BEDROOM APART 
MENT in house on Man 
hattan Ave. acros* 
from Univtrsity. With 
waaher and dryer. Very 
nice and very reaaon 
able. 539-8804. 

JUNE AND Aug. availabili- 
ty. Ont, two tnd 
tour-bedroom 1017- 
1029 McCollum $385- 
$800. Close to campus. 
776-3804 



Brittnay 

Ridge 

TownHomjs^ 

Now Leasing 

For June & August 

* Compare* 

TM*j| liiefl ISOOsq. 

ft., 4 bedroom, 2'A 

bath townhomes. 

Refrigerator, rangt, 

microwave, 

dishwasher. 

BBO gazebos and 

sand volleyball court. 

*FuH-size* 
washer/dryer 
in each unit. 

For only 
S86Q m o. 



CHASE MANHATTAN 
APARTMENT* OFF- 
IDS YOU ALL TMi 
COMFORT. Of NEW: 

modem Interior*, dish 
waahtr*, microwave!, 
clubhouet with swim- 
ming pool, lun dack, 
laundry, lounge, tnd 
workout ftcilitltt In- 
cluding *talrmi*t*rs, 
exercise blkei, weights. 
tnd TVI Occupancy 
nttrlng 100 percent. 



MODEL 
SHOWINGS: 

No Appoiatmttui Taktn 



Tkim*my3-3p.m. 
Satanitjr ty aee*. only 

Colo 
Ml* CeaatJaCraat Oleic 




LARGE TWO- three-bed- 
room tpartmant 10 
minute walk from Set- 
ton Kali. With washer/ 



dryer 220 air condition. 
1550/ month. Call 
537- 7 142 I pets t 
maybe). 



K-Rental Mgmt. 



Studio $220 up 

1 Bedroom $290 up 

2 Bedrooms $330 up 

3 Bedrooms $480 



539-8401 



LUXURY NEXT to campus 
thraa-badroom, two 
baths, waaher, dryer, 
central air, garbage dis- 
posal, parking, no pets 
Aweilabla June $750. 
537-8543 

NEXT TO campus Nice 
two, three-bedroom 
apartment with washer . 
dryer, central air, no 
pet*. Available Aug. 
$460- $850 537-8543 

NOW LEASING for Aug 
1001 Bluamont $780 
Very large two-bed 
room, two bath. NIC* 
unltt. Clot* to Ag- 
gitvill*. 776-3804, 

ONE AND iwo-b*droom 

apartments convenient 
to campus available 
June 1 and Aug. 1. 
1390 $450 References 
requested, no smoking 
or pats please, Borst 
Restoration 776-1460. 



lldkl/nuhklMrVh 



•Quality 2 Bedrooms' 
)2l2BluemoRt$SOO 
1 106 Bluemont $500 
907 Vattier $490 



_*">-«H-40 I 



ONE-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE April 15. 1222 
Laramla $325. All utili- 
ties paid. Cloee to cam- 
pus. 776-3804. 

ONE-BEDROOM BASE- 
MENT apartment. 620 
Osage $210. Available 
April IS. Water/ traih 
paid. 776-3804 

OVERLOOK CAMPUS, two- 
bedroom , dishw**her, 
li replace, laundry lee ill 
ty. Available Aug. 1. 
$610. 537 2285 

PARK PLACE APART 
MatNTS. Now pre-leas 
Ing ont, two tnd 



three-bedrooms. 
539-2951. 

ROOMMATE: NEEOED for 
tour-bedroom/ two 
bath. Available Aug. 6 
Wood way Apartments, 
$194 a month. 
one-fourth utilities Ask 
for Sttvt, Tony, or 
Brian 537-7677 

THREE-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT in house on Man 
hittan Ave. across 
from University. With 
washer end dryer. Very 
nice and very reason- 
able. 539-8804 

TWO-BEOROOM AVAIL 
ABLE in June. 1126 Fre- 
mont $510. Trash paid 
Dishwasher, garbage 
disposal, laundry facili- 
ties on site. Close to 
City Ptrk and Ag- 
gieville. 776-3804. 

TWO THREE-BEDROOMS 
ont tnd one-half bath, 
central air, laundry, 
near campus, available 
June or Aug. 537-8800. 

TWO, TWO- bedroom 
apartments. $585 per 
month. One month de 
posit include* trash and 
lawn care. Waaher and 
dryer hook- upt, ap- 
pliances, central air and 
haat, two lull baths 
Leases begin May 1 or 
June 30. Call 539-8800 

VERY NICE four-bedroom 
houae available May 1. 
1817 College Heights. 
$1200 All utilities paid. 
Close to cimput. 
776-3804. 



For flent- 



FOUR AND/ or five-bed- 
room house for rent. 
921 Kearney, unfur- 
nished, central heat/ 
tir, waaher/ dryer, 
$825- B75. Call Darin 
537-0474. 

NON-DRINKING AND 
Smoking, for two and 
three-bedroom places. 
No pat*. Reference! 
539-1554 



QUIT PAVING: HINT! 

Nice older home cur- 
rently duplex. Three 
bedrooms plus and etu- 
dio with KW/ solar. 
Convert* to large home 



or stay a* is and I 
RENT Clota to park, 

downtown and KSU. 
Studants take this to 
your parents. 1-800- 
593 0519. After 7p.m. 
Priced in the 50'e. 

130| 

For R«r»t- 
Mobilt> HortiM 



14X70 THREE-BEDROOM 

Mobile Home, one -half 
acre fenced for hor*tt 
Furnished/ unfurnished 
available June 1. 
537-7901 

1381 



For! 

Mobile Homtt 



1982 COMMODORE 14X65 
two-bedroom, one 
bath, large living room, 
refrigerator, range, 
new washer and dryer. 
Must tee to appreciate. 
Colonial Garden* lot 
1 1 18. Available May 
16th $10,500, 567-0608 
Or 537-7759. 

COUNTRYSIDE BROKER- 
AGE will sell your mo 
bill home for you. W* 
have fantastic result!. 
We do our own financ- 
ing. Call 538-2325. 

TIRED OF peying rent? Buy 
my 70X12, two-bed 
room, 1987 Skyline Mo- 
bile Home for only 
$4000. cell 539-2228 

1481 



Roommate 
Wanted 



FEMALE ROOMMATE for 
summit needed lo 
(hire fully furnished 
two-bedroom apart- 
ment $250/ month. Wa- 
ter/ trash paid No peta. 
778-9859 Heather 

MALE ROOMMATES 

needed to blip shire a 
three- bed room houtt. 
538-3726 

NEED FEMALES to thara t 
summer sublets* on t 
thrtt- bed room a pert 
ment. Furnished, water/ 
trtah paid. Vary close 
to ctmput. Call 
776-2256. 

NEED NON-SMOKING 
milt roommate for 
one-btdroom In nlct 
flvt-btdroom house 
Everything furnished 
except bedroom. $200/ 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Aprtl 1», 1— 4 *| -fl 



Collegian Classifieds 



th phi* 
587-03 



shared utili 
-0380. 

NON-SMOKING FEMALE 
roommate wanted to 
• hare very nice (wo 
badroom apartment 
wtth Architecture m»|or 
student, stettlno in 

' June or Aug, own 
room, washer/ dryer. 
$220 a month plus one- 
hall utilities. Call 639 

* 1874 or leave message 

ROOMMATE NEEDED to 

share fivs-badroom 
house. fISO par month 
plua one-fifth utilities. 
Cloaa to campus. Call 
537-1*21 

ROOMMATE WANTED 
own badroom In 

two-bedroom E. High- 
way 24. May 1 $197.50 
rant. Pert OK. 537-2790. 

WANTED NON-SMOKING 
and non-drinking male 
tor bate merit furnished 
private bedroom. Wall: 
to KSU. S150. Share 
ut i I ilies 539-1554 

WANTED: ROOMMATE to 
there a two room apart- 
mini in Craatwood 
Apartment* $210 a 
month. Very new and 
vary nice. On top of 
Stagg Hill. Call 539- 
4937, ask for David. 



1004 MCCOLLUM St., sum 
mar sublease, two large 
bedrooms. One block 
from Ourland Hall. $550 
plua ut ill ties. Call 587 
4669, leave message 

1839 COLLEGE Heights 
Summer sublease 
two-fcedroom, fully fur- 
nished, dishwasher, 
central air. Up to four 
people. Rent negoti- 
able. Call 539-6895 

ACROSS FROM Ahaarn. 
Available lata 

May- July 31. Nieav 
one-bedroom, dish 
washer, water/ trash 
paid. $380 negotiable 
776-4095 

AVAILABLE MID-MAY- 
Aug. Sublease ona 
room In four-bad room 
apartment. Pay only 
June and July $700/ 
month plua one fourth 
utilities. Nice, cloaa to 
campus. Call 538-261 1 . 

AVAILABLE MID MAY 
through late August. 
Ona-half block from 
campus. Hunting Ave 
nue partially furnished, 
washer, dryer, ona-half 
utilities, rent negoti- 
able. 776-4021 

BEST BET yatl 

Mid-May- Aug. Mod- 
ern. Right by campus. 
Negotiable. 539-2136. 

CHEAP! FEMALE needed 
for summer. $120 per 
month, one- third utili 
lie*. Your own room, 
ona block from cam- 
pus. 537-3645. 

CHEAP RENT for summer 
sublease Vary nice 
apartment, Ona block 
from campus. Only 
$130 a month. Needed 
either May or June 
until Aug. 1. Female 
roommate preferred. 
Call 776-1496, Aak for 
Gina 

CLEAN TWO-BEDROOM 
apartment. Vary close 

to campus and Ag 
gieville. Price negoti- 
able call Jenny or Amy 
537-2835. 

DESPERATELY SEEKING 
summer sublease rt for 
two-bedroom apart- 
ment. Close to campus 
and Aggie villa. No rea- 
sonable offer refused! 
537-3531 

FOR SUMMER subleaae. 
two-badroom apart-' 
ment. Ona block from 
campus. Will negotiate 
price. U7-4739 

FOUR-BEDROOM/ TWO 
baths Apartment near 
Aggieville and campus. 
Very nice end modern. 
Rent negotiable. Call 
Lor. 539-4530 

FULLY FURNISHED 

two-bedroom apart- 
ment available mid- 
May- July 31 Close to 
campus and Aggieville; 
weter and trash paid. 
Rant negotiable 1 

637-9634. 

HOT DAMN! Wanting to 
live in luxury over the 
summer and not have 
to pay for it? Curious 
about Chase Manhat- 
tan Apartments? We've 
got the answer for you. 
Pool, sun deck, basket 
ball, lounge, weight 
room, huge rooms, 
laundry, private balco- 
ny for parties- excited 
yet? Three- four-bed- 
rooms. Call quick and 
or upl! 639-1261. 



HOT DAYS, need new 
pool. We need summer 
subleeser(s) for 

thrae-bedroom at 

Woodway. furniture/ 
rent negotiable Call 
632-2126 or 532-2375. 

JUNE- JULY sublease 
large two-bedroom 
apartment $375 weter/ 



trash paid, dishwasher, 
, low utilities 619 Osage 
776-2393. 

JUNE AND July sublease 
Nice, clean two-bed- 
room, one bath. Wash 
er,' dryer. Close to Cam- 
pus. Call 776-3144. 

MALE ROOMMATE need- 
ed- summer- own 

room, furnished or not- 
pool, spacious, air con- 
ditioned. Available May 
12. $180/ month. Call 
587-0631 

MALE/ FEMALE roommate 
needed for summer 
with option for longer. 
Free washer/ dryer. 
Cloaa to Aggieville 
Welk to campus. $200 
plus one fourth utili 
ties 776-4148 leave 
maaaage for Chris 

MALE/ FEMALE subleaser 
mid-May- Aug. Own 
bathroom, utilities 
paid, except one-half 
KPL and phone. May 
rent free $150/ month 
537-3069, Steve. 

NICE TWO-BEO- 

ROOM, summer sub- 
leaae. Pool, washer/ dry 
ar. Rant $450 but very 
negotiable. Mey rent 
paid. 776-7643, 

NICE TWO-BEDROOM, 
1326 N. Manhattan, 
May or June until July 
31. No pets $526 776- 
7998. 

ONE-BEDROOM BASE- 
MENT apartment avail- 
able mid- May through 
mid-August. Rent $200. 
Washer, dryer, air con- 
ditioner, partly fur- 
nished, Cloaa to cam 
pua acroas from Ford 
Hall. Call 817760635 

ONE-BEDROOM SUB- 
LEASE June and July at 
Park Place $330 a 
month. Two pools. Can 
renew lease. Cell Mike 
at 539-3556 

OWN ROOM In two-bed- 
room. Pets OK Mey 1- 
July 31. $197.50 rent ne- 
gotiable. 637-7290. 

OWN ROOM in two-bad- 
room apartment, two 
pools, washers and dry- 
ers. $141.67. plus one- 
third utilities 637-4030 
or 637-9087 ask for Jen- 
nifer. 

SIX-BEDROOM SUMMER 
aubleaae. Washer/ dry- 
er, central air, three 
blocks from campus. 
Very nice, $t60 negoti 
able 776-5942 or 
776-3773, 

SPACIOUS TWO-BED- 
ROOM apartment. 

Large master bedroom. 
Across from camput, 
naer Aggieville. $480 
per month. 537-6104 

SUBLEASE ONE-BED- 
ROOM of two bed 
room apartment in 
quiet building. Avail- 
able now- July 31 All 
' utilities paid, except 
electric, central air. cats 
allowed Cat! 539-8606 

SUBLEASE SPACIOUS 
two bedroom apart- 
ment, end of May 
through July. Fur- 
nished, three blocks 
from campus. Rent ne- 
gotiable. If interested 
call 537-3685 

SUBLEASE. FEMALE 

roommate wanted, 
own room, can be fur- 
nished, $175/ month 
plus half utilities, close 
to ville and campus. 
Non-smoker wanted. 
776-1301. leave mes- 
aage. 

SUBLEASE: SPACIOUS 
three-bedroom one 
and one-half bath. 
Great summer location. 
June end July. Nego- 
tieble. Cell 537-3981, . 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 
large, two-bedroom 
apartment; two blocks 
from campus, one and 
one-half blocks from 
Aggieville; rent negoti 
able; call 776-3483. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 
roommate needed, 
own room $700/ month 
plua utilities, washer/ 
dryer, close to camput 
and Vat Med. 537-1561. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- Stu- 
dio apartment right 
next to camput. Fur- 
nished, water and trash 
paid. Available May IS 
Aug. 1 $300 539 8203 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- to 
ahara three-bedroom 
apartment. $200/ 

month and one-third 
utilities. Cell Taleyna 
537 2538 

SUMMER SUBLEASE in 
Royal Towers to share 
furnished four-bed 
room apartment May- 
Aug. Price negotiable 
CaM539-«614. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 

one-bedroom Fur- 
nished or unfurnished. 
Utilities paid. $250/ 
month. Near camput, 
Call 776-0596. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE! 
Three- bed room, close 
to camput end Ay 
glevtllel Prloe negoti 
ablel Call todayl 
637-6129 



SUMMER SUBLEASE. 

nice, negotiable, 

two-badroom, two 
bath, vary cloaa to Ag- 
□ieville Mid-May- Jury 
31 Call 639-41 23 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, 
ona-bedroom in a 
three- bed room apart- 
ment Cloaa to Ag 
^leviNe. Quiet neighbor 
ood. $195/ month plus 
utilities. Call Susan al 
637-8379. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, 
roommate to ahere two- 
bedroom apartment 
close to campus. 539- 
8499. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, spa- 
cious, three-bedroom 
apartment. Two blocks 
from campus. Available 
mid-May. Price negoti 
able Call 537-8074 and 
leave message. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, two- 
bedroom partially fur- 
nished, cloae lo campus 
and Aggieville. June/ 
July $315/ month, utili- 
ties end deposit, 539 
9173 

SUMMER SUBLEASE. 

Non-smoker to share 
two-bedroom apart- 
ment. Furnished. Own 
room. Washer/ dryer. 
Call 778-1847 after 
5:30p.m. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE: Two 
-bedroom apartment 
available mid-May until 
July 31 Water and 
trash paid. Rant negoti 
able 539-6597 

SUMMER SUBLEASE: very 
nice three-bedroom 
apartment one block 
from campus end one 
block from Aggieville 
Available mid-May 
through August. Vary 
raaaonable rent. 537- 
3577 

THREE-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT for summer, 
close to cam pua, wash- 
er and dryer, jolt Of 
room, price negotiable 
call 639-7654. 

THREE-BEDROOM SUB- 
LEASE $175 per room. 
June 1 to Aug. 1. Call 
532-2891 

TOWNHOUSE SUMMER 
subleaae option to rent 
Five-bedroom j 2.6 
bathrooms, washer/ 
dryer. Available on or 
after Mey 1. $186/ 
month/ person. 

537-3027. 

TWO-BEOROOM APART 
MENT, one block from 
cempua. Available 
mid-May to July 31. 
$166 a month. May rent 
paid. Cell 537-1734. 

TWO-BEDROOM HOUSE. 
Available mid-May to 
July 31, Option for 
1994- 95 school year. 
No pets. 539-3497 

TWO BEDROOM, FUR- 
NISHED, one block 
from cempua. Air con- 
ditioner, dishwasher 
AM utilities psld. Hant 
negotiable. Call/leave 
message, 776-3035. 

WOODWAY- ONE BED 
ROOM AVAILABLE 
Mey 1- July 31. Call 
537-3952 



2<» 



SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



210| 

Resume/ 

JxB*aa 

DATA SHEETS, term pa 

Car*, dissertations 
aser printer. Fast, ac- 
curate service. 12 years 
experience. Mrs. Bur- 
dan, 539-1704 



RESUME RESUME RE 
SUME and all your 
other word processing 
needs. Leser printing. 
Call Brenda. 776-3290. 

WOROPROCESSING SUP 
PORT for your acade- 
mic and professional 
need*. Papers, 

resumes, letters, re- 
ports. Contact Peggie 
(eveningsl at 539-1 191 



M 



Not enough 

time on your 

hands to get 

everything 

done? 

Check the 

Classifieds 

service directory, 

Ck INH , mil 
OLLEGIAN 

Kedzie 103 S32-»5S5 



ADVERTISING PRODUCTION 



|,\\< Will 



Xlet training and gain experience while earning one hour or 
credit this fall. Monday and Wednesday morning classes 
are still open so sign up now. Attend class one day a week 
from 8:30 a.m.-i 1:30 a.m. The instructor's permission is 
required. 

The experience you earn in the fall would qualify you to 
.apply for a paid position in the spring. 



Pl'SsQUIlOjf 



I'ri'jjnaiio 
I ostiitji ( iiiiii" 

539-3338 

•I l.i ■ ;>|- ■ m. u \ 

■ 
■I> I.I ' lUtl 

0> in' 

•S,inx lie ii/miIk 









Mon.-Pri. 
9 a.m. -5 p.m. 



Automotive) 
Repelr 



NISSAN- DATSUN Repair 
Service. 22 years ex- 
perience. Matdea, Hon- 
das and Toyotas also. 
Auto Craft, 7S17 Dipper 
Lane, Manhattan, Kan- 
las. "537-5049. Ba.m.- 
5p.m. Mon.- Fri. 



Othor 
Service* 



INTERNATIONAL STUD- 
ENTS: DV-1 Green card 
Program. Sponaorad 
by U.S. Immigration. 
Greencards provide 
U.S. permanent resi- 
dent status. Citizens of 
almost all countries are 
allowed. For informa- 
tion and forms: New 
Ere Lege) Servicaa, 
20231 Stagg St., Cano- 
ga Part. CA 91306. Tel: 
T8 181772-7 168; 
1818)998-4425. Mon - 
Sun.: 10a.m.- 11p.m. 

PROMPT CONTRACEPTIVE 
and abortion services 
Dale L Clinton. M0, 



(9131841-6716 



Insurance 



HEALTH AND Auto cov- 
erage Call ua before 
purchasing The Uni- 
versity Health Plan. Tim 
L. Engls Agency 3628 
Kimball Ave. (Candle 
wood Shopping Can- 
ter I 837-4861. KSU 
1988 



300 



EMPLOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 



3101 



H«lp Wented 



The Collegian cannot 
verify the financial po- 
tential of advertiee- 

mente In the Employ 
ment/Career classifica- 
tion Readers are ad- 
vised to approach any 
such employment op- 
portunity with reason. 
sble caution. The Col- 
la glen urges our road' 
ore to contact the Bet- 
ter Business Bureau, 
SOI SE Jefferson, To- 

Retta. K* 66607 1190. 
I13U32 -0464 

•780/ WEEK. ALASKA 
Ftanersae thie summer, 
Meritime Servicaa 
1208)060-0216 

ALASKA SUMMER EM- 
PLOYMENT- Earn up 
to 98000 Plua in two 

months. Room and 
board! Trent portal! on I 
Male or female. No ex- 
perience necessary. Call 



1206)646-4168 ext. 
A6768. 

ARGANBRIGHT HAR- 
VESTING. Wanted, 
clean cut person (or 94 
harvest run Best equip- 
ment end pay mid-May 
through mld-Aug. 
Thad, 1-363-2737 

ATTENTION GREEKS: 126 
yeer- old firm hat 20 
spots available for sum 
. mer work. Make excel- 
lent career contacts for 
future job searches, 
over $1,600 per month, 
real world experience. 
For information cell 1- 
800 840 2840 

ATTENTION STUDENTS- 
I'm looking for 8- 10 
sharp hard- working 
students for summer 
work. If SS600, travel 
end e challenge appeal t 
lo you, call 

1800)640-7840. 

CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIR- 
ING- Earn up to $7,000 
plus*' month working on 
Cruise Ships or Land- 
Tour companies. World 
(ravel Summer end 
Full-time employment 
available No experi- 
ence necessary. For 
more information call 1- 
206-634 0468 ext C5768, 

OELIVERV DRIVERS want 
•d for the KC Metro 
Area. Put your vehicle 
to work for you. Full- 
time days, great sum- 
mer job. Call Quick De- 
livery 19131888 8627 

EARN OVER $100/ hour 
processing our mail at 
home. For information. 
Cell (2071310-5958. 

HARVEST HELP wanted. 
Need combine end 
truck drivers lor sum 
mer wheat hervssl. 
Board, room, and good 
pay. Home before 
school ttarta. 

1913)877-2094. 

HAVE FUN, make memo- 
ries and money I Chris- 
tian family harvesters 
need kitchen helper, 
laundry, cook and 
clean Half day for 
$600. full day $1000 
plus room and board. 
No couch potatoes po- 
sition filled. 
1316)328-4232 

HELP WANTED for custom 
harvest-- combine op- 
erators and truck drlv- 
era. Experience pre- 
ferred. Call 
I303M83-7490 evenings. 

INTERNATIONAL EM- 
PLOYMENT- Make up 
to $2000- $40000 plus/ 
month teaching basic 
conversational English 
In Japan, Taiwan, or S. 
Korea No teaching 
background or Asian 
languages required For 
information call: 

(206)632-1 146 
ext, J 5768 



LABORERS NEEDED for 
construction work. 
Start Immediately. Cell 
1913)84 1-6347. 

LABORERS NEEDED. Land 
tcapa end retaining 
well experience re- 
quired. Start imme- 
diately, call 
(913)641-6347. 

NANNIES WANTED-tPosi 
tiona nationwide, sum- 
mer or year round, ex- 
perience not required 
Great pay and benefits, 
free travel. 

1612)643-4399 

NANNY/ CHILOCARE giv- 
er. Mature, responsible, 
loving person. Wanted 
to care (or ona and 
three yeer old girls at 
our home Monday- Fri- 
day, 7.30a m.- 5:30p.m. 
beginning May 16, 1994 
or August 1994. Part- 
time also a possibility. 
Permanent position, 
good pay Call 776-8338 

NEWSPAPER ADVI.lt- 
TtSlNO SALES Mont 

S ornery Publications 
a a an opening lor an 
advertising sales repre- 
sentative to service ac- 
counts in our mufti-pub- 
lication area. Must be 
responsible, well- or- 
ganised self- starter 
who can produce re- 
sults with minimal su- 
pervision. Previous 
media sales experience 
preferred. Base salary 
plus commission and 
mileage allowance. 
Send resume IN CON- 
FIDENCE to Deily 
Union, P.O. Box 129, 
Junction City, Kenses 
66441 or fill out eppllce- 
tioa al 222 Wast 6th 
Street 

PART-TIME MAIN- 

TENANCE person need- 
ed May 15 for 60 apart- 
ments, basic plumbing, 
electrical, and carpen- 
try skills needed. Re- 
spond to P.O, Box 128S 
Manhattan. 

QUALIFIED PERSON to op- 
erate milling and feed 
delivery for large twine 
operation in NE Kansas. 
Five and one-helf days/ 
week, salary wilh tick 
leave, paid vacation, in- 
surance package. Send 
resume to Rt. 2 Box 97, 
Washington, KS 66968 

START NEXT WEEK1 R 

L. Polk & Co. it now hir- 
ing for morning, after 
noon, and evening 
shifts Conduct brief tel- 
ephone interviews, no 
selling involved NEW 
TRAINING PRO- 
GRAM! Pleesent work- 
ing environment. Peid 
breaks. No experience 
needed. A paycheck 
every week. Apply in 
parson at FT L Polk & 
Co. 10am- 4pm, Mon- 
Fri. at Suile 913. 3003 
Anderson Ave (Village 
Ptaial E.0.EJM/F/V7D. 



SUMMER EMPLOY 
MINT. Experienced 
Combine or Truest 
Drive re needed for 
custom wheal har- 
vettlng operation 
' Motel and Meals In- 
eluded. Wages bated 
on experience. Work 
from May 20 thru Au- 

fust IS, 1994. From 
• in to Montane 
Lancaster Harvesting, 
Dodge City, Kansas. 
Cell Now (316)727-8821. 

SUMMER WORK available 
at KSU Vegetable Re- 
search Farm, OaSoto 
(Kansas City area). $67 
hour/ 40 hours par 
week. Must have own 
transportation to the 
farm. Contact Dr., Cha- 
rles Merr, Horticulture, 
Waters Hell 632-6170 
or Christy Nagel (same) 
for mora Information. 

SUMMER WORK. $470 per 
week average Good 
track record needed. 
Call 1 -600-640-2840. 

THE CITY of Manhattan, 
Kansas has two posi- 
tions available for Crew 
Leaders to supervise 
youth work crawa in a 
variety of parks related 
activities. Salary: SS 50- 
$6. Call Terry DeWeeee 
at 687-7767. 

THE CITY of Westmore- 
lend is accepting appli- 
cations to fill the posi- 
tion of pool manager 
WSI certiflcetion re- 
quired for further in 
formation call 

1-457-3361 or request 
en application from 
City Hell 707 Main St. 
Westmoreland. 

TRAVEL FROM Taxes to 
Montana on a profes- 
sions! wheel hervestlng 
crew. Guaranteed 
monthly wage, bonus, 
room end board. Call 
1913)567-4649. 

WANTED HARVEST 

HELP Run three 1994 
Case international com 
binet. Three 1991 
Chevy Kodiak automat- 
ic twin screw trucks. 
Pey It $1000- $1200 a 
month room and board 
is provided. Need CDL 
drivers license. Wa will 
help obtain CDL over 
Spring Breek, Prefer 
non-smokers, 
non-drinkers and no 
drug users Gaines Har- 
vesting 1913)689-4660. 

WORKING COUPLE seeks 
In-home titter 

-someone responsible, 
enthusiastic, energetic 
end experienced. Work 
with three boys, ages 7, 
5, and 2. Needed Be m 
to 5:30p.m. weekdeyt, 
June through early 
Aug Call 537-4667 
after 6p.m. 



The Collegian cannot 
verity the financial po- 
tential of advertise 
mint! In the Employ 
ment/Career c la self lea 
tlon. Readers are ad- 
vised to approach arty 
euch business oppor- 
tunity with raaaonable 
caution. The Collegian 
urgaa our roadara to 
contact the) Setter Busi- 
ness Bureau, SOI SE 
Jaffa re an. Top eke KS 
64*607 1190. 



400 



tpnngt aat for $50, 
eofe- $60 or best offer, 
coffee tablea- $15 a 

place. 776-7883. leave 




CsrfiifMrtsyrs 



4860X33 $1500. 4 MS ram, 
SVGA, 100 MS HD. 
tape, modem, dot nu 
trlx printer. DOS $. Su- 
perstore, utllitlee. Jim 
537-3902 after 630p.m. 



Kfc.ee* 



FOR SALE two-foot Iguana 
Including tank, heet 

.rock, heet bulb/ light. 

'$70 for ell or best offer. 
Kevin 539-4776 



OPEN 
MARKET 



Itema for Sal* 



Thigh Cream 

•25 

1 ; Manhattan Weight 

Loss Clintc 

217 South wind 

' i 539-7700 i i 

♦♦ ♦ ♦ »»» #♦ »»»♦♦♦ i > 



1990 EX 500 Kawasaki, 
4600 mite, Blue end 
white Excellent condi- 
tion. Garaged $7700. 
Tan marble. Four-per- 
son hot tub, $1750, 
776-6649 

CAP AND gown Phd 
length 56; 16-foot 

Grumman aluminum 
canoe, old time pad 
dlaa; two Sansouci life 
jackets, vests end pil- 
lows, 536-4112. 

FOR SALE blender $10, CO 

Slayer $75, end tables 
S, stereo cabinet $10. 
awival rocking chair 
$16, 539-2228. 

FOR SALE: Tickets to Royal 
Winnspeg Ballet at Mc 
Cain -April 22nd. Greet 
idee for e date! Must 
sell- 537-5017. Diane. 



Furniture to 
■uy/SGll 

COUCH, TWO chairs, cof- 
fee table, matching aet, 
western style, $100 539 
2866, leave message. 

SIMMONS QUEEN size 

mattress- $60, queen 

' site mattress and box 



APARTMENTS 



August 



MODEL SHOWINGS 

\i I i*p|i-i. I ittti'v Ki*liivi - \<» \ppmnlnii nt> 1*1 krn 



I *ONE BEDROOM* 



$355-380 



l854-S8Claflin 
Clue* to campus 

Model: Wed k Fri. 3-5 ptn. 
1858Cbnm#8 
1022. 24, 26 Sunset $345-395 

Cloae to campus- 
Model: Tues. 4: Thurs. 4-5 p.m. 
1022 Sunset #2 
1950-1960 Hunting M35455 

Model' By Appt. Only 
411-13-15 N. 17th $360-380 

Model: By Appointment Only 



•TWO BEDROOMS* 

— 405 N. 10th $385-410 

Model: By Appointment Only 

— 1417-1419 Leavenworth $475-495 
West of City Park 

Model: By Appt. Only 



j *2 BEDROOM-EXTRA SPACIOUS*" 



| * MULTI-UN IT HOUSES* | 
300 N. 11th, 1 Bedroom 

Model: By Appt. Only 
1503 Fairchild, 1, 2 Bedrooms 

Model: By Appt Only 
924 Fremont, 1 Bedroom 

Model: By Appt. Only 



$300 — 



$250-300 



$300 



1825-29 College His. 
fHimlshed. • 

Model: Tues. * Wed. 6-8 p m 
1 825 College His. #4 
1001 Bluemont 
Furnished. 

Model; Mon. or Wed. 6-8 p.m. 
1005 Bluemont #10 
Aggieville Penthouse Apts. 
Newly remodeled 

Model By Appt. Only 
UOBertrand 
Next lo campus 

Model: By Appt. Only 



$720-840 



$780 



$550-700 



$575 




Managed by McCuItough Development 

776-3804 



5QBD 



TRANS- 
PORTATION 



1982 VW Sclrocco, 
five-speed, two-door. 
air, AM/FM cassatte. 

.good tires, runs great.. 
S1400 or beat offer Call 

I 687-0749, leeva mat- 



1986 CAMERO, V 8, needs 
tune- up, asking $2,400. 
Call 776-1172 You can 
call after 10p.m., leave 
ai 



1986 NOVA, white, air, 
auto, 88,000. Great, reli- 
able car. Asking $2860. 
776-6820 

1988 T-eiRO Turbo Coupe 
Excellent condition, au- 
tomatic sunroof, doors, 
seats, windows, 

five-speed, ground af- 
fects, loaded, 96,000 
miles. Must sell, S4O00, 
call Buss 776-3231. 



21-INCH SCHWINN World 
10-speed. Excellent con- 
dition. Low mileage 
Best offer 539-6211. 

TREK 820 Antelope with 
lock $200. 687-0861. 
leave message. 



( nine hi kid/if 

liir ti H it r ii ili i 



; |> in 



1 



1974 YAMAHA DT 250, 
street/ trail, runs good, 
good tires, new battery, 
under 3000 miles, $600. 
776-2365 

1981, 1100 Honde Gold- 
wing Interstate in very 
2 ood condition $2200, 
all 537-0482 leeve 
message or call Wayne 
532-6916. 

1982 SUZUKI GS750T, 
runs excellent, new 
rear tire, very good con- 
dition. $1200 or best off- 
er. 776 7860, «tk for 
Chris. 

60D 



TRAVEL/ 
TRIPS 



6201 



Alrptow Ttcitart* 

DOMESTIC AIRLINE ticket: 
from anywhere to any- 
where (roundtrip is ok). 
Valid until Nov., with a 
male's name on. Face 
value $298 or beat off- 
er. Call 639-7067. 



Classified Directory 



OT0 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 



010 Amounrarnerits 
040 Lotfartfcjund 
090 Pereoftais 
040 M6«aX)*VEv6Titt 
000 PsrttM-ri-More 

m 



HOUSING; 
REAL ESTATE 



100 ForRent — 
AptFumtstwd 

110 ForRsri- 

Apt UrAjftiihid 



111 RocmsAvulaoto 

120 r'wRonl-HouaOB 
18S R>f Sale -Houses 
1X0 FotRart- 



130 FotSale- 



140 For H6f«- Garage 
140 Roxmrnate Wanled 
110 Sublease 
100 Stable/Pasture 
100 Office Space 
Id LandfofSale 

2TO 



SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



TutOf 



210 r+esume/Typino 
110 OesMop Publishing, 
220 Sewing/AIteialiorai 
220 Pregnancy Testing 
200 LawnCare 
200 Child Care 
240 Mustctans/DJs 
240 P* Services 
200 Automotjve Repair 
200 Other Services 



M 



EMPLOYMENT 
CAREERS 



010 Help Warrted 
020 Volunteers Needed 

000 Susinesa 

Opportune!*! 



4J3& 



OPEN 
MARKET 



400 WanttdtoBuy 

410 Hems for Sale 

411 Fuirature to Buy/Sei 
400 GamgsVYarrj Sales 
420 Auction 

400 Antiques 

400 Corrputers 

440 FoouSpede* 

440 Music Instruments 

400 Pets and Supples 

400 Sporong Eftfm** 

400 Stereo Erjuepmant 

400 TUsSteloBuy/Ssi 



OTrf) 



TRANS- 
PORTATION 



010 AutomoWes 
BOO Bicycles 
000 Motorcycles 
040 CarPoot 




010 lour Padu>gss 

020 AirpuvwTWiete 

000 Tram TTcfarti 

040 Bus Tickets 



CATEGORIES 

To help you And what you arm 
looking tor. the classified ads 
have been arranged by category 
and sub-category. Alt categories 
are marked by one ol the large 
images, and sub-caiegonea are 
preceded by a number 
designation, 

TIPS FOR 
WRITING A 
CLASSIFIED AD 

Always put what item or 
service you are advertising first 
This helps potential buyers find 
what they are looking for. 

Don! use abbreviations Many 
buyers are confused by 
abbreviations. 

Consider including the pnee 
This tells buyers if they are 
looking al something in their price 
range. 

WE DO NOT UOE PHONE 
NUMBERS Oft LAST NAMES M 
PERSONALS. 



12 



Mondw. April IB. 1W4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Responses vary 
to new election 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

communications and one of the 
student candidates to appeal to 
the tribunal, said she was glad 
the election was overturned, but 
that the election regulations still 
need to be reformed. 

"1 hope this will be a lesson 
for years to come," Foster said. 

She said she thought students 
would be too discouraged with 
the elections to vote again. 

"I think only half the people 
who voted before will vote 
again," Foster said. "It will deter 
people from voting. They're sick 
of it" 

Foster said she would not 
campaign again for a seat on the 
Student Board of Publications 
but that she would serve if stu- 
dents remember her name and 
write her in. 

Michelle Smith, junior in 
political science, said she and her 
running-maie Patrick Robben, 
junior in political science, would 
not run again for student body 
president and vice president. 

She said she didn't agree with 
the tribunal's decision to hold a 
new election because she thought 
most candidates had been fairly 
treated. 

"We felt that, yes, the elec- 
tion's had its problems, but all in 
all, they were fair elections." 
Smith said. 

She also said the cost of 
spending the $300 for a new 
election outweighed the benefits. 
. Jeff Peterson, who received 
the most votes for student body 
president, said he was sure the 




tribunal had its reasons for call- 
ing for a new election. 

"If it was ruled that the elec- 
tion was invalid, then there's no 
choice but to hold a new elec- 
tion," Peterson said. 

He said he would work hard 
to make students realize the elec- 
tion isn't over yet. 

Stacy Dalion, who came in 
second place in the first election 
for student body president, said 
she was disappointed about 
stretching out the election for 
another week. 

"I think everyone was geared- 
up for the run-off," she said. 

Jared Adams, a candidate for 
student body president who was 
disqualified from the ballot and 
appealed to the tribunal, said he 
thought the tribunal's decision 
was a just one. 

Jane He Moore, freshman in 
microbiology and Adams' vice- 
presidential running-mate, 
announced Sunday night she 
would run as a write-in candidate 
for an Arts and Sciences Senate 
seat. 



BSU protests in newsroom 
against political cartoon 



Colle|iin 

About 30 students from the 
Black Student Union made good on 
the further action they promised in 
a letter to the editor published in the 
Thursday, April 14 edition of the 
Collegian. 

Friday ai about 1 1:30 a.m. BSU 
members entered the Collegian 
newsroom and ripped copies of the 
paper marked with red circles and 
slashes, then dropped them to the 
floor. Some members stomped on 
the papers. 

When asked for comment after 
the incident, two members of the 
group refused and said they did not 
wish to be misrepresented. 

While they were ripping the 
papers, group members said they 
were showing their dissatisfaction 
with a political cartoon that ran in 
last Wednesday's Collegian. 

The cartoon depicted a blind- 
folded Shanta Bailey, chairwoman 
of the Grievance and Elections 
committees and senior in psycholo- 
gy, choosing candidates for the bal- 
lot by throwing darts at a board 
covered with candidates' pictures. 



The BSU's letter demanded an 
apology to Bailey in the Collegian 
by Friday and said that action 
would be taken if their demands 
were not met. 

Members of the BSU and mem- 
bers of the Collegian editorial staff 
met Thursday to discuss the BSU's 
dissatisfaction with the cartoon. 

The Collegian refused to run an 
apology on the grounds that the 
political cartoon was fair criticism 
of a public figure. 

However, the editor of the 
Collegian said the BSU had every 
right to express how they felt 
towards the cartoon. 

"We're a very open newsroom. 
Whenever people have comments 
or criticism, they're welcome to 
come and share that, and they did," 
Wade Sisson, editor and senior in 
journalism and mass communica- 
tions, said. 

He also said BSU's expression 
of opinion was done in a positive 
manner. 

"It was handled very positively 
because it was framed around their 
right to free speech, which I 
respect," Sisson said. 



Serbian tanks hault air strike 



WILLIAMSBURG, Va. — 
Serbian tanks moving into the 
Bosnian city of Gorazde have 
made NATO air strikes virtually 
impossible. President Clinton said 
Sunday. 

Because of the proximity of 
Serbian forces to U.N. observers 
and Gorazde citizens, "It 
wouldn't necessarily be possible 
now for close air support to have 
the desired military effect ." 

He spoke to reporters at 
Newport News-Williamsburg 
International Airport amid reports 



that Serbian tanks were rolling 
into the Muslim enclave. 

The United States, through 
NATO, remains willing to 
respond to U.N. requests for mili- 
tary support, Clinton said. But he 
added, "We have a diplomatic 
role, and we are doing our best to 
fulfill it." 

Clinton said U.N. negotiations 
with the warring factions in 
Bosnia had registered some 
progress. He pointed to the 
release Sunday of 16 Canadian 
soldiers, who were among more 
than 1 SO U.N. peacekeepers being 
kept under virtual house arrest. 



« 



Attention Creative Mb | 

students! 

All sections of English 410, 

Intro to Creative Writing 

are OPEN. 






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Exp. Date 00/00 
Kansas Stats Historical Society 
Newspaper Section 
120 U 10th 

Topeka KS 46612 



C KANSAS STATE 
OLLEGIAN 




Radical environmentalist 

can* for shared power, new value* ' 

PAGE 3 



APRIL 19, 1994 



KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66506 




VOLUME 99A, NUMBER 139 



Student body 

presidential 
candidate Stacy 
Dal ton and her 
running mate, 
Dale Sllvius, 
discuss their 
platform Monday 
evening at the 
K-State Student 
Union, 

HARK LIFTOOWIU. 

Collegian 




Pair focuses election on issues 




Collegian 

The campus' attention on the 
shortcomings of the Elections 
Committee has overshadowed many 
important issues, a presidential tick- 
et said Monday night. 

Student body presidential candi- 
date Stacy Oalton and her running 
mate. Dale Silvius, said they want- 
ed to remind students of the issues 
in this campaign. 

"The limelight given to the 
Elections Committee has made this 
election a name game." Silvius said. 
"The students have been short 
changed." 

Dalton and Silvius said oppo- 
nents Jeff Peterson's and Brad 
Finkeldei's promises to veto fee 
increases was a non-issue. 

"Fee increases take a two-thirds 
majority to pass in the Senate, the 
same as a veto override," Silvius 
said. "The president really does not 
have a vote." 

Dalton said that if elected, she 
would work to cut fees wherever 
she could. 

"The $10 decrease in the Lafene 
fee this year marks the first time 
Senate has ever recommended a 
decrease to the Board of Regents," 
Dalton said. 



Dalton said she voted in favor of 
that legislation, which still has to be 
approved by the Kansas Board of 
Regents next monty before the fee 
will decrease. 

Dalton said K-State's fees have 



not increased as fast as tuition. She 
said students can effectively lobby 
against rising tuition. 

"The problem is that there has 
never been a packaged sale of K- 
State to the Legislature," she said, 



Former candidates endorse Peterson 



QoSatlM 

JfcUchclle Smith and Patrick 

tobben are endorsing Jeff 

tterson for student body presi- 

aod his running mate. Brad 

Smith and Robben dropped out 
of the presidential race Sunday 
after Student Tribunal announced 
there would be a new elecGon. 

Smith said their platform and 
Peterson* i platform were similar in 
several ways. 

She said they agreed on the 
srtnership for Excellence plan 
id both thought students should 
sve a better connection with the 




Robben said Peterson has an 
i vantage, because he is an out- 
is removed enough from 
cnate and student government 



that he can see the big picture," 
Robben said. "He'll bring in fresh 
ideas." 

Smith said considering 
Peterson's margin of victory, they 
felt xhe most responsible thing to 
do was withdraw from the. elec- 
tion, 

"No matter how you divide up 
the votes, the result will be the 
same." Smith said, "I felt it was a 
fair race." 

Smith and Robben said they 
both plan to continue work in poli- 
tics. 

Smith, who challenged Lena 
Oleen for the state Senate seal in 
1992, plana to work oa Jim 
Slattery's campaign for the democ- 
ratic nomination Tor governor. 

Robben said he would like to be 
considered for the Elections 
Commitee chair next year. 



"while we (K-State) get more of the 
top students in Kansas." 

Dalton said the majority of col- 
lege-bound students from all but 
three Kansas counties attend K 
State. 

Silvius said these are things that 
students can take to the Legislature 
when trying to lobby against the ris- 
ing cost of education. 

The candidates also said they 
would like to publish information 
from faculty evaluations. 

"Student government could fund 
the project by selling advertising in 
the book," Dalton said. 

If elected, Dalton said she would 
appoint someone to her cabinet to 
start looking into how to publish the 
evaluations. 

Silvius called Peterson's position 
to cut executive salaries a token 
gesture. 

"Dale and I plan to prove our 
actions to the student body," Dalton 
said. 

The pair also said it has a plan of 
action to avoid what Dalton called 
an election fiasco next year. 

"We will appoint someone to our 
cabinet to begin studying other 
schools' elections processes imme- 
diately," Dalton said. 

"There's no need for us to rein- 
vent the wheel," Silvius said. 



Presidential 
candidates 
debate again 



CMhtsJsi 

A- -^sVover, 

The debate between candidates 
for student body president and vice 
president continued at noon on 
Monday in the K-State Union 
Courtyard 

"Good afternoon and welcome to the sec- 
ond weekly presidential debate," Brent 
Coverdale, moderator of the debate, said. 
Laughter came from some of the 1 5 people 
attending. 

Only three of the original six presidential 
candidates attended the debate. 

"I'm still running for student body presi- 
dent," Steffany Carrel said. 

Carrel made numerous remarks regarding 
an incident where spilled paint resulted in her 
late expenditure report. Laughter could be 
heard throughout the gathering. 

"The first thing I would do is outlaw all 
black acrylic paint," Carrel said. 

"I spilled paint, and I turned in my expense 
report late," Carre II said. 

"Now, you have to write my name in. 1 
think that's crazy." 

Jeff Peterson, student body presidential 
candidate, said he didn't have much more to 
say about himself. 

"There's probably not a lot more I could 
say about myself that hasn't already been 
printed," he said. 

"What does K-State need right now? What 
kind of leader do we need?" Peterson said. 

He said they do not see any need at this 
point to raise student fees. 

Stacy Dalton, presidential candidate, said 
her strength is in teamwork. 

"The thing with Dale (Silvius) and I is 
teamwork," Dalton said. 

Eventually, there were about 20 people 
attending the debate. 

"If we get elected, we promise this fiasco 
will never happen again," Silvius, Dalton' s 
running mate, said in reference to the throwing 
out of last week's election results. 



SGA ELECTION LOCATIONS 

The second student general election will be from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 
p.m. on April 20 In the K-State Union first-floor alcove. 



sli 




CaMnHall KedaeHi 

T Anderson Hail 

I Vattier Street 



NORTH J) 



Elections tor College of Veterinary Medicine students will be from 
11 :30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. outside the cafeteria In Trotter Hall. 

Denison Avenue 



Greenhouse D - Conservatory 

III* 1 * 



Umberger Hall 



Pittman 

Building 



vet Sri. 

Building 




Trotter 
Hall 



Closing concerns spread 
into local school systems 




TEO KADAU JtL / CoSagtari 




The Collegian staff regrets that it will not be 
able to produce a Voters* Guide for the new 
general election on Wednesday. 

A lack of time prevails, though we encourage 
you to forward any questions about the election to 
the newsroom (532-6556) or SGA (532-6541). 



TAWHY A I WHT 

Collegian 

Area school districts aren't plan- 
ning for a closing or downsizing at 
Fort Riley, but there is no doubt 
they would be affected if those 
things happened. 

"The closing of Fort Riley 
would have an impact on our lives 
— there's no question about that," 
Jim Rezac, Manhattan High School 
principal, said. 

About 20 percent of the children 
in the Manhattan -Ogden Unified 
School District 383 are dependents 
of Fort Riley military or civilian 



personnel, according to January 
1994 school -district figures. 

"This is so uncertain. It's noth- 
ing we're planning for at this point 
and time, but it potentially means a 
loss of revenue," Jackie Walter, 
USD 383 personnel business direc- 
tor, said. "The state affords us 
$3,600 per student for a general 
operating fund." 

Junction City Unified School 
District 475 is more dependent on 
the military base for its student 
population. 

About 60 percent of the students 
■ See SCHOOLS' Page 10 



FORT ACCOU 
OF MANHA' 

► According to a Sept. 20, 199 
has this number of students 

Military 



► USD 383 had 6, 
about 20 percent of 




OR 20% 
DENTS 



ittan Unified School District 383 



CI Tun IWf CHMS) VnfHfWt 



> Fori Riley accou 
account tor over 70 
the base, USD 475'* 




1,079 
J.415 

Riley accounts for 



aid, Dependents 
ISD 475. Without 
fewer than 2,500. 



KATU WAlKER/CoAcgitf 



►NIXON ENTERS HOSPITAL; 
FEW DETAILS RELEASED 

NEW YORK — Former President 
Richard Nixon was hospitalized Monday. 

A Nixon spokeswoman, Cathy 
O'Connor, said the 81 -year-old was sick 
but did not immediately have further 
details. 

Carolyn Migliore, a spokeswoman for 
New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center, confirmed Nixon was there but 
said she could not give out further 
details 

Nixon lives in Park Ridge, N.J. He 
was the nation's 37th president. 

His wife, Pat, died last year. 



►SOPHOMORE DROWNS IN 

POTTAWATOMIE LAKE 

A K-State student apparently 
drowned Sunday night at Pottawatomie 
Lake No. 2. 

Paul J. Renner, 21 , sophomore in 
civil engineering, was out on the lake 
with another man when he went over the 
side and dkJn't resurface, Wendy Wolfe, 
■communications officer for the 
Pottawatomie Police, said 

The man tried to rescue Renner. but 
when his attempts failed, he called the 
police. 

Police are still investigating circum- 
stances surrounding the accident. 

Wolfe said the body had not yet been 
recovered Monday afternoon. 

1AWMYA 



Exp, Date 00/00 
Kansas SUt* Historical Society 
Newspaper Section 
120 U 10th 
Topeka KS 66612 



C KANSAS STATE 
OLLEGIAN 




Radical environmentalist 

cite for stared power, new values ' 

PAGE 3 




APRIL 19, 1994 



KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66506 



VOLUME 99A, NUMBER 139 




Pair focuses election on issues 




AMPMW TOIW 

Collegian 

The campus' attention on the 
shortcomings of the Elections 
Committee has overshadowed many 
important issues, a presidential tick- 
et said Monday night. 

Student body presidential candi- 
date Stacy Dalton and her running 
mate. Dale Silvius, said they want- 
ed to remind students of the issues 
in this campaign. 

"The limelight given to the 
Elections Committee has made this 
election a name game," Silvius said. 
"The students have been short 
changed." 

Dalton and Silvius said oppo- 
nents Jeff Peterson's and Brad 
Finkeldei's promises to veto fee 
increases was a non-issue. 

"Fee increases take a two- thirds 
majority to pass in the Senate, the 
same as a veto override," Silvius 
said. "The president really does not 
have a vote." 

Dalton said that if elected, she 
would work to cut fees wherever 
she could. 

"The $ 10 decrease in the Lafene 
fee this year marks the first time 
Senate has ever recommended a 
decrease to the Board of Regents,'' 
Dalton said. 



Dalton said she voted in favor of 
that legislation, which still has to be 
approved by the Kansas Board of 
Regents next montji before the fee 
will decrease. 

Dalton said K-State' s fees have 



not increased as fast as tuition. She 
said students can effectively lobby 
against rising tuition. 

"The problem is that there has 
never been a packaged sale of K- 
State to the Legislature," she said. 



Former candidates endorse Peterson 



. Michelle Smith and Patrick 
Robben are endorsing Jeff 
Pe tenon for student body presi- 
dent and his running mate, Brad 
FmkeWei. 

Smith and Robben dropped oat 
of the presidential race Sunday 
after Student Tribunal announced 
there would be a new election. 

Smith said their platform and 
Peterson's platform were similar in 
several ways. 

She said they agreed or the 

rtnership for Excellence plan 

both thought students should 

ive a better connection with the 

egjalatnre, 

Robben said Peterson has an 
i vantage, because he is an out- 

"He is removed enough from 
ate tnd student government 



that he can see the big picture," 
Robben said. "He'll bring ia fresh 
ideas." 

Smith said considering 
Peterson's margin of victory, they 
felt .the most responsible thing to 
do was withdraw from the. elec- 
tion. 

"No matter how you divide up 
the votes, the result will be the 
same," Smith said. "I felt it was a 
fair race." 

Smith and Robben said they 
both plan to continue work in poli- 
tics. 

Smith, who challenged Lana 
Oleen for the state Senate seat in 
1992. plans to work on Jim 
Slavery's campaign for the democ- 
ratic nomination for governor. 

Robben said he would like to be 
considered for the Eleclit 
Cotnmitee chair next year. 



r 



"while we (K -State) get more of the 
top students in Kansas." 

Dalton said the majority of col- 
lege-bound students from all but 
three Kansas counties attend K- 
State. 

Silvius said these are things that 
students can take to the Legislature 
when trying to lobby against the ris- 
ing cost of education. 

The candidates also said they 
would like to publish information 
from faculty evaluations. 

"Student government could fund 
the project by selling advertising in 
the book," Dalton said. 

If elected, Dalton said she would 
appoint someone to her cabinet to 
start looking into how to publish the 
evaluations. 

Silvius called Peterson's position 
to cut executive salaries a token 
gesture. 

"Dale and I plan to prove our 
actions to the student body." Dalton 
said. 

The pair also said it has a plan of 
action to avoid what Dalton called 
an election fiasco next year. 

"We will appoint someone to our 
cabinet to begin studying other 
schools' elections processes imme- 
diately," Dalton said. 

"There's no need for us to rein- 
vent the wheel," Silvius said. 



Presidential 
candidates 
debate again 



CoJkpin 

And you thought it was 
over 
The debate between candidates 
for student body president and vice 
president continued at noon on 
Monday in the K-State Union 
Courtyard 

"Good afternoon and welcome to the sec- 
ond weekly presidential debate," Brent 
Coverdale, moderator of the debate, said. 
Laughter came from some of the 15 people 
attending. 

Only three of the original six presidential 
candidates attended the debate. 

"I'm still running for student body presi- 
dent," Steffany Carrel said. 

Carrel made numerous remarks regarding 
an incident where spilled paint resulted in her 
late expenditure report. Laughter could be 
heard throughout the gathering. 

"The first thing I would do is outlaw all 
black acrylic paint," Carrel said. 

"I spilled paint, and I turned in my expense 
report late," Carrell said. 

"Now, you have to write my name in. I 
think that's crazy." 

Jeff Peterson, student body presidential 
candidate, said he didn't have much more to 
say about himself. 

"There's probably not a lot more I could 
say about myself that hasn't already been 
printed," he said. 

"What does K-State need right now? What 
kind of leader do we need?" Peterson said. 

He said they do not see any need at this 
point to raise student fees. 

Stacy Dalton. presidential candidate, said 
her strength is in teamwork. 

"The thing with Dale (Silvius) and I is 
teamwork," Dalton said. 

Eventually, there were about 20 people 
attending the debate. 

"If we get elected, we promise this fiasco 
will never happen again," Silvius, Dalton's 
running mate, said in reference to the throwing 
out of last week's election results. 



SGA ELECTION LOCATIONS 

The second student general election will be from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 
p.m. on April 20 In the K-State Union first-floor alcove. 




NORTH J> 



vattier Street 



Elections for College of Veterinary Medicine students will be from 
11 :30 a.m. to 1 : 30 p.m. outside the cafeteria In Trotter Hall. 

Denison Avenue 



Greenhouse D ■ Conservatory 





bergerHall 



Pittman 

Building 



vetSci. 
Building 



Trotler 

Hafl 



Closing concerns spread 
into local school systems 




TIO KADAU JR. / CaHagfen 




The Collegian staff regrets that it will not be 
able to produce a Voters' Guide for the new 
general election on Wednesday. 

A lack of time prevails, though we encourage 
you to forward any questions about the election to 
the newsroom (532-6556) or SGA (532-6541), 



TAWHYA Ml H f 

Col kg in! 

Area school districts aren't plan- 
ning for a closing or downsizing at 
Fort Riley, but there is no doubt 
they would be affected if those 
things happened. 

"The closing of Port Riley 
would have an impact on our lives 
— there's no question about that," 
Jim Rezac, Manhattan High School 
principal, said. 

About 20 percent of the children 
in the Manhattan-Ogden Unified 
School District 383 are dependents 
of Fort Riley military or civilian 



personnel, according to January 
1994 school-district figures. 

"This is so uncertain. It's noth- 
ing we're planning for at this point 
and time, but it potentially means a 
loss of revenue," Jackie Walter, 
USD 383 personnel business direc- 
tor, said. "The state affords us 
$3,600 per student for a general 
operating fund," 

Junction City Unified School 
District 475 is more dependent on 
the military base for its student 
population. 

About 60 percent of the students 
■ S«r SCHOOLS' Page 10 



FORT ACCOU 
OF MANHA' 

► According to a Sept. 20, 

has this number of students 

Military 



> USD 383 had 6; 

about 20 percent of 




OR 20% 
DENTS 



Unified School District 383 



> Fort Riley 
account for over 70 
the base, USD 475'! 




;« H is of J •: 13 •'•-' 
IpoptAftft 

tr*cr» annuity b 




Riley accounts for 



aid. Dependents 
ISO 475. Without 
■fewer than 2,500. 



KATIE WALKEfl/C<ril«gMn 



► NIXON ENTERS HOSPITAL; 
FEW DETAILS RELEASED 

NEW YORK — Former President 
Richard Nixon was hospitalized Monday. 

A Nixon spokeswoman, Cathy 
O'Connor, said the 81 -year-old was sick 
but did not immediately have further 
details. 

Carolyn Migllore, a spokeswoman for 
New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center, confirmed Nixon was there but 
said she could not give out further 
details. 

Nixon lives in Park Ridge, N.J. He 
was the nation's 37th president. 

His wife, Pat, died last year. 



►SOPHOMORE DROWNS IN 
POTTAWATOMIE LAKE 

A K-State student apparently 
drowned Sunday night at Pottawatomie 
Lake No. 2. 

Paul J. Renner, 21, sophomore in 
civil engineering, was out on the lake 
with another man when he went over the 
side and didn't resurface, Wendy Wolfe, 
•communications officer for the 
Pottawatomie Police, said. 

The man tried to rescue Renner, but 
when his attempts failed, he called the 
police. 

Police are still investigating circum- 
stances surrounding the accident. 

Wolfe said the body had not yet been 
recovered Monday afternoon 

TAWNY* 



g TUw dm*. April 19, 1—4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




National News 



by the Associated Press 



► SCHOOL (>mCWU OUTLINE DESEGREGATION PUN 



TOPEKA — School administra- 
tor! ourJo^ Itotr dea«iro«tJori pi*" 
Monday, hoping to oorMnc* * Mv- 
•I judge that It would bring the 
Topaka syttam Into compliance with 
the U.S. Supreme Court') historic 
Brown v. Board of Education deci- 
sion. 

However, attorneys for dissatis- 
fied black parenta and the American 
Civil Liberties Union attacked the 
proposal during their cross-examina- 
tion ot the administrators. 

They tried to show the plan la 
unrealistic and relies too heavily on 
whites volunteering to send their chil- 
dren to schools In minority neighbor- 
hoods. They also claimed the dis- 
tricts numbers are flawed. 

U.S. District Judge Richard 
Rogers began a week- long hearing 
in a case known as Brown II, after 



the landmark 1964 ruing that school 
segregation Is unconstitutional. 
Rogers Is supposed to review pro- 
posals designed to eliminate ves- 
Uges ot segregation In Toptka 
schools. 

A key moment came when Chris 
Hansen, an ACLU attorney, ques- 
tioned a demographics specialist for 
the district, Scott McCulty, and led 
McCully through a aeries of mathe- 
matical calculations. 

The calc u lations seemed to show 
that almost 300 of the white students 
expected to transfer to two schools 
In minority neighborhoods do not 
exist, because enrollments at other 
schools are not reduced by that 
number. 

The point la, they have to come 
from somewhere,* Hansen said. 

Generally , the black parents' plan 



► RESEARCHERS STUDY POSSIBILITY Of LIFE ON MARS 



EL PASO, Texas — Researchers 
trying to learn it there is We on Mars 
went into the Earth lor dues, study- 
ing how organisms can thrive isolat- 
ed from organic matter miles under- 
ground In the nation's deepest cave. 

Five scientists, including three 
from NASA, spent nearly a week in 
New Mexico's Lechuguilla Cave, col- 
lecting bacteria that live In an envi- 
ronment the scientists say mimics 
Martian characteristics 

"This Is the first time where we 
have had them (the organisms) in an 
accessible deep underground envi- 



ronment. On Mara, if lite haa sur- 
vived, It has to be deep under- 
ground,* Chris McKay, a NASA plan- 
etary scientist, said Monday in a tele- 
phone Interview from Carlsbad 
Caverns National Park in New 
Mexico. 

Researchers want to study how 
the organisms can exist In 
Lechuguilla, which Is located In a 
wilderness area of the sprawling 
park about 180 miles northeast of El 
Paso. The cave has been surveyed 
to a length ot more than 70 miles 
and a depth ol 1 ,593 feet. 



► SHARK-BITE VICTIM WON BATTLE AGAINST LEUKEMIA 



SAN DIEGO — A woman authori- 
ties believe was killed by a great 
white shark had recently won a battle 
against leukemia, friends say. 

The body found floating off a pop- 
ular surfing spot was identified as 
Michelle Von Emster, 25. of San 
Diego, the medical examiner's office 
sax) today. 

'What happened is really a 
shame because she had a lot of 
tough going in her life." Denisa Knox, 
owner of the office-supply store 
where Von Emster worked as a 
clerk, said. 



'What she told us was that she 
had been In remission the past two 
years from leukemia and that she 
had undergone really horrendous 
treatment* 

The body was found Friday about 
200 yards off a beach at Point Lama 
Marine biologists aald the woman 
had been attacked by a 12-foot-long 
great white shark 

Barring new evidence. Von 
Emster's death would be the first 
confirmed shark-bile fatality along 
the Pacific Coast ol the United 
States since 1989 



►SHUTTLE TO LAND 
AFTER A-PLUS TRIP 

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. 
— Endeavour got an A plus 
for its 10-day Earth-surveying 
mission as its six astronauts 
packed up Monday for the 
trip home. 

The space shuttle is set to 
land just before noon EDT 
Tuesday at the Kennedy 
Space Center 

Forecasts called for 
. acceptable weather In the 
seaside Kennedy runway, 
with light winds and only a 
slight chance of offshore rain. 

Endeavour, which blasted 
oft April 9. has enough sup- 
plies to stay aloft for three 
more days if Tuesday landing 
opportunities are missed. 

A $386 million set ot radar 
instruments, some of the 
most sophisticated ever put 
Into space, kept operating 
through Monday. 

The equipment was to be 
shut down about seven hours 
before landing. 

► R0SEANNE ARNOLD 
FILES FOR DIVORCE 

LOS ANGELES - 
Roseanne Arnold filed for 
divorce Monday Irom her 
husband, Tom. the man with 
whom she has shared fame, 
fortune, a TV show and a 
knack for headline-grabbing 
shenanigans tor four years. 

The filing came three 
days after an argument 
erupted between the Arnolds 
on the set ol ABC's 
"Roseanne." reportedly over 
a woman who had taken part 
with the couple in a mock 
three- way marriage. 

Roseanne Arnold. 41, 
tired Tom Arnold from his job 
as her show's executive pro- 
ducer, cut up his credit cards 
and dashed oft to Europe for 
a three- month trip without 
him, a source dose to the 
couple said. 




[GE REPORTS i 



K-STXTE POLICE 




These reports are taken directly from the deity logs of the 
K-State and Riley County Police departments. Beeauee o( 
apace constraints, not all crimes are listed. 
SUNDAY, APRIL 17 ■Ha^LaaaaaaaaaaaataHBB 
At 1024 p.m., Carolyn cninf to harm heraelf. Officer* 



McClukey of Font Criaia Center 
reported ■ female subject threat- 



checked three locations, but were 
unable to locate subject 



MONDAY, 

At 1:27 p.m 



181 



an injury. 
major- da mage accident waa 
reported ■( Plllibury Croat log. 
Joae Zapata. Fori Riley, struck a 



barbed-wire fence, Jerri and 
•Robin Brack, Wichita, were 
Injured. 



ELECTIONS 



■ A voters' ratty will be from noon to 1 p.m today in 
the Union Courtyard. 

si A student body presidential debate, sponsored by 
Golden Key National Honor Society, will be at 7:30 p.m. 
today in the Union Big 8 Room. The candidates will 
answer students' questions. 



POSTMASTER'S NOTICE 

The Kansas State Cotegian (USPS 291 020), a student newspa- 
per at Kansas State University, is published by Student Publications 
Inc., Kedzie Has 103, Manhattan, Kan. 66506 The Coiteoan is pub- 
lished weekdays ounng the school year and once a week through 
the summer Second class postage is paid at Manhattan. Kan. 
66502. 

POSTMASTER Send address changes to Kansas State 
Cotegian, circulation desk, Kedzie 103. 
Manhattan, Kan 66506-7167. 



TUUO AY, APRIL 10 

* 

■ Society for Creative Anachronism will meet at 6:30 p. m. at (he 
National Guard Armory. 

■ Hispanic American Leadership Organization will meet at 6:30 
p.m. at the Ecumenical Campus Ministry. 102 1 Deniion Ave. 

■ Leabian/Gay/Biaeiual tuppon group* will meet from 3:30 to 5 
p.m. The women will meet in Lafene 236, and the men will meet in 
Ufene 238. 

■ Allan American Students for Intercullural Awareness will 
meet at 6:30 p.m. in Union 202. 

■ Circle K will meet at 9 p.m. in Union 204. 

■ Christian Science Organization will meet at 3:30 p.m. in 
Danfonh Chapel. 

■ Mortar Board will meet at 6 p.m. in the Union Big 8 Room. 

■ KSU Amateur Radio Club will meet at 6:30 p.m. in Union 
204 

• Golden Key National Honor Society will meet at 6:30 p.m. in 
Union 212. 

■ Students for the Right to Life will have officer election! at 
7:30 p.m. in Union 209. 

■ KSU Pre Physical Therapy Club will have' officer elections at 
8 p.m. in Union 206. 

• KSU Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs will meet at 6 
p.m. in Calvin 101. 

■ SPURS will meet at 8:30 p.m. in Union 213. 

■ Career and Employment Services will conduct a job-search 
orientation at 4:30 p.m. in Waters 137 for seniors in agriculture. 

■ The Graduate School has scheduled the final oral defense for 
the doctoral dissertation of Pei-Kun Tsai at 3:43 p.m. in Nichols 
236. The dissertation is titled "A Conceptual Structure for 
Verification of Task Specifications." 

■ Mark Chenrington of Earthwatch will present "Healing the 
Planet" at 7 .10 p.m. in Umberger I OS. Cherrington is the Earth 
Week '94 keynote speaker. 

■ "Preparing for the Law School Admissions Test" will be from 
1:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Union 203. 

■ Richard Forsyth, director of the College of Architecture and 
Design, will present "Bath. England: The Development of its 
Historic Landscape" si 2:30 p.m. in the Union Little Theatre. 




WEATH 



YESTERDAY'S HIGHS AND LOWS 





Today, much cooler with highs in 
the 70s. Tonight, slight chance ol 
thunderstorms with lows in the 
mid-40s. 



Much cooler, partly 
cloudy and windy 
with a high ot 70 and 
a low ol 45. 



TOMORROW 

Wednesday, a 
chance for 
thunderstorms and a 
high around 65 or 70. 





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DICK 



East Highway 24 



!( I) < 



EDWARDS 

MANHATTAN 



776-4004 



t ■ K 1 S YOl i 



KANSAS STATE mi f vc.i an 



Tuesday, April 10, 1994Q 



■MNSBSf of ttw 



group California 
Graan, apaaka 
about radical 
an vl ronman ta I 1 am 
ami changing ttw 
way w* live to 



Monday avaning 
at tha K-Stala 
Union. 

Coliiglan 




Activist calls for 'radical environmentalism 



"My own 
philosophy of 
tho now 
paradigm Is 

one of shared 

■a 

Stage* Shuu 

Environmental 
actvwl 



Collegian 



Ti 



| he ecological 
crisis that we 
are facing 
demands more 
of us than mainstream 
environmentalists, 
Stacey Shull, a radical 
environmentalist, said 
Monday. 

"The ecological crisis calls for a 
radical ecology perspective that 
requires us to make personal sacri- 
fices and change our value system 



in order to have sustainable com- 
munities and live in balance with 
the earth." said Shull, the bio- 
diversity campaign coordinator Tor 
California-Hawaii Student 
Environmental Action Coalition. 

Shull gave her first speech out- 
side of California to students on 
Monday night in the K-State 
Union for Earth Week. 

"I am speaking on radical envi- 
ronmentalism, and it fits the topic 
of environmental organizing 
because most of the northwest 
coast has radical environmental- 
ism," she said. 

Redwood Summer initiated her 
into the environmental movement 
at the time regarding the ancient 



forest issue, Shull said. 

In the summer of 1990, the 
Redwood Summer battle ensued 
between lumber companies and 
environmental activists in the 
Pacific Northwest. 

"Redwood Summer was an 
inspiring time during the timber 
wars when we organized together 
to stop an injustice," Shull said. 

"We did civil disobedience and 
direct action with the main pur- 
pose to get media attention." she 
said. 

The timber wars are not about 
two groups fighting against each 
other. It is not one group fighting 
for an agenda and the other group 
fighting for a different agenda — it 



is a group fighting for a new para- 
digm against the group clinging to 
the old paradigm. Shull said. 

"The paradigm shift or world 
view shift goes beyond transition 
from Styrofoam™ cups to paper 
cups, or from fossil-fueled cars to 
energy-fueled cars. 

"It is much deeper than that. It 
is a complete shift in value sys- 
tems. 

"Conservatives are scared of 
radical environmentalists, and they 
should be scared of us because we 
want to completely change every- 
thing radically," she said. 

Radical environmentalists each 
have their own view of the new 
paradigm. Shull said. 



Law alters 
succession 
to governor 




Wsfald 



CaasM 

Imagine Kansas with K- 
State President Jon Wefald 
as the governor. 

Imagine that the gover-, 
nor, lieutenant governor, 
president of senate, speaker 
of the house, attorney gen- 
eral, and the chancellor of 
the University of Kansas 
are dead and Wefald, who 
is eighth in line for gover- 
nor, has to take over. 

Kansas statute makes the 
president of K-State the eighth in line for gover- 
nor, but legislators want to change that. 

This statute is being changed to remove the 
chancellor of KU and the president of K-State by 
a Kansas House of Representatives bill intro- 
duced by Sen. Lana Oleen. R-Manhattan 

Oleen said these two are being removed from 
the line of gubernatorial succession because the 
law is outdated. 

"I introduced the bill. The reason is, I am a 
member of the Flood Task Force," she said. 
"Because of the floods, we looked at lots of dif- 
ferent statutes regarding disasters. This one is 
outdated." 

Oleen said this new law will make only elect- 
ed officials in charge of Kansas, should the gov- 
ernor die. 

"In times of disasters, only elected officials by 
the people would be in charge of this state," she 
said. 

The chancellor of KU and the president of K- 
State were added to the line of succession in 
1961. They were added when there was a fear of 
nuclear war. 

Wefald agrees that university -appointed offi- 
cials should not be in charge of the state. 

"There is no practical reason why the chancel- 
lor of KU or the president of K-State should be 
in the gubernatorial line of succession," he said. 

The bill has been passed by the Senate and the 
House and is waiting for the governor's signa- 
ture. 



Take a study break 
with the K-State Collegian. 

C KANSAS STATE 
OLLEGIAN 

Coming the list week of classes. 







CLOSED CLASS LIST 






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C — Cancdlsd Clsi 


M 
























♦Closed class list alio 












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In Our Opinion 




fly the Collegian Editorial Board 



High school about learning, not goodness 




to ifivftwOti th# 
fact that ft 
school** 
definition of 
"good" might 
not be the one 
students ami 



irlry 
subscribe to. 



The high school curriculum just ain't what 
it used to be, Instead of trigonometry, history 
and government classes, high school students 
have to learn the basics of community service. 

This constitutes not only a breakdown in 
the emphasis of academics, but a forced injec- 
tion of morals that is beyond the reach of the 
power of the school district, 

Lynn Stetrer is a high school senior in 
Pennsylvania who won't he graduating this 
June because she refused to comply with the 
required 60 hours of community service that 
must be completed before graduation. 

"We try to educate the students to be good 
as well as smart," said one educator. 

It's unfortunate goodness can't be taught. 
Not to mention the fact that a school's defini- 
tion of "good" might not be the one students 
and parents necessarily subscribe to. 

For example, at some schools, Eagle scouts 
cannot count the hours they worked to earn 
their badges. Why? Because they personally 
benefited from it. 

Ptstricts are actually taking the stand that 
community service "doesn't count" unless it is 
totally selfless, useless to the student and 
mindlessly altruistic in general. 



If students were this selfless, they wouldn't 
need to be forced into volunteer work by a 
graduation requirement. 

Volunteer-service requirements are an 
imposition of personal values that the public 
school system should not interfere with. 

If students don't believe in this "involun- 
tary volunteering," should they have to sell 
out their principles for a diploma? How moral 
are they then? 

The primary purpose of high school is not 
to teach students to be moral, upstanding citi- 
zens. 

In America's deteriorating educational cli- 
mate, literacy and general academic compe- 
tency are more important. 

As for Lynn Steirer, she has actually com- 
pleted more than 60 hours of service, but she 
simply refused to fill out the papers to fulfill 
the graduation requirement. She will be 
attending Penn State University in the fall. 

Penn State evidently didn't care whether 
she met the "goodness" requirement. They 
judged her by the standards of ability, intelli- 
gence and talent. 

Imagine that. 



Readers Write 



► ELECTIONS 



Shanta Bailey is responsible 
despite cartoon depiction 

Dear Editor, 

I'm writing to show my personal support 
for a dear friend of mine, Shanta Bailey. I've 
known Shanta for 10 years and would like 
everyone to know that she is definitely not 
the irresponsible public official portrayed in 
the Collegian. 

She is a fair, even-handed and compas- 
sionate person and is, undoubtedly, to be 
commended for salvaging the student elec- 
tions, which, if you'll recall, always tend to 
be a circus. 

To Mr. Marlett. 1 hear there are plenty of 
opportunities available to get involved with 
the election process for next year. I chal- 
lenge you to take on some responsibility and 
show us exactly how well you could do in a 
similar situation. 

You are entitled to your opinion, but put 
your criticism into action and show us what 
you've got. 

Iatl Bautista 

senior/Spanish and political science 

► CARTOON 

Shanta and committee 
owe students an apology 

Dear Editor, 

It is a sad day when someone acquiring a 
college education would hide behind the 
charges of racism to excuse incompetence. 

Shanta Bailey and the entire Election 
Committee should apologize to the student 
body for their obvious lack of commitment. 

By the way, what will the Black Student 
Union do if there isn't an apology — slop 
buying the Collegian? 

I 
Randy Pattersom 

junior/criminal justice 

► REBPOMtE 

Suicidal don't need pep talks; 
they need compassion 

Dear Editor, 

I am writing in response to Lola 
Shrimptin's April 13 column. In this piece, 
Lola gave us a million and one reasons why 
suicide is stupid and, as she put it, reprehen- 
sible. 

Well, Lola, I agree with you 100 percent, 
but there's one thing you neglected to think 
about. 

People who are suicidal don't want to be 
told to just pull themselves up by the boot- 
straps and to get over it. Instead, they want 
someone compassionate enough to try to lis- 
ten and understand what they're going 
through. 

Often times, suicidal people can't juit 
snap out of it — they need the encourage- 
ment and help of those around them. 

I, too, have been in shoes similar to 



yours, Lola. I have been taking medication 
for severe clinical depression for many 
years. I've also been suicidaLmore times 
than I care to think about. I remember what 
it's like to want to chuck your whole life to 
stop the pain that's deep in your gut. I truly 
understand. 

Lola, if you really want to write an anti- 
suicide column, be a little more sensitive to 
those you are trying to reach out to. Think 
about what that kind of pain is like. Such 
sharp criticism only pushes people closer to 
the edge. 

Jenny Sterrett 

sophomore/human development and fami- 
ly studies 

► ATHLETIC* 

Women's teams neglected by 
athletic department 

Dear Editor, 

I have been amazed with K-State's athlet- 
ic department's ability to so quickly sign a 
new head coach for the men's basketball 
team. The selection committee apparently 
had several back-up plans in place just in 
case the top contenders chose not to come to 
K-State. 

I am equally amazed with the fact that the 
head women's volleyball position has been 
vacant for months. 

Filling it seems to be a low priority. I 
don't know whether this is because volley- 
ball is a "non-revenue" sport or because it is 
a "women's" sport. At any rate, the selection 
committee has gone back to square one with 
the search after their one choice said "no 
thanks." 

I am not privy to the inner working of our 
athletic department. I have no desire to be. 
But it strikes me as being a bit odd that the 
two women who were in head-coaching 
positions here have left, and men were 
named* as their successors. 

I am not arguing that men cannot coach 
women. I would not argue that a woman 
could not successfully coach our men, but 
we know that this is not likely to happen. 

There are many talented women who 
could come to K -State and be successful 
coaches. 

Since we're starting the search all over 
again, why not give them a chance? 

Carolyn Coon 

graduate student/education 

► PARKING 

Stop whining and walk an 
extra block once in awhile 

Dear Editor, 

As a student who commutes from 
Lawrence, I am well aware of the parking 
situation on campus. 

However, I feel that the people who are 
whining about guests to our campus being 
given good parking spots should be ashamed 
of themselves. 

Students, faculty and staff are all hosts to 



the visitors to our campus, and we should 
behave accordingly. 

This means displaying common courtesy 
that includes walking an extra block a couple 
of times over the course of a semester so a 
guest doesn't. 

As a side note, in less than 15 minutes a 
person can walk from Lot D-1W, where I 
have never failed to find a spot, to Justin, 
King or Shellenberger halls. 

If you're really in a hurry, this is what I 
would suggest. 

Don Aye 

graduate student/industrial engineering 

► FEES 

Bicycle fee would only add to 
bureaucracy at K-State 

Dear Editor, 

Students pay about $200 per semester in 
campus fees. Quite a part of this goes lo 
campus maintenance. That is, roads, lawns, . 
trees, trash cans ... but not bike racks. 

Apparently (as we do have some bike 
racks on campus), there was some money in 
the past to buy them. There should be some 
money now. Why not? 

Because this is an original way to raise 
fees. More than that, somebody has to go 
and control bike permits and issue tickets. 
Somebody has to lake care of the bike per- 
mit agenda. This adds more people to our 
flourishing bureaucracy. 

And where is my $5? In the new wonder- 
ful bike racks? Oh, no. These people have to 
get paid, you know. 

Magdalena Velebilova 
graduate student/mathematics 

► MULTICULTURAL!** ! 

Lecture by Maj. Robles didn't 
belong in International Week 

Dear Editor, 

I am writing to you concerning the lecture 
given by Maj. Gen. Josuc Robles on multi- 
culturalism. 

Gen. Robles' lecture had no place in this 
so-called "International Week." The 
General, more or less, fed us a 45-minute 
commercial for the armed forces. 

He told us of the cute celebrations they 
have each month to honor different national- 
ities, and he told us how the military was "its 
own culture." ■ 

This, however, was the closest he got to 
keeping with the theme of multiculturalism. 
The rest of the time was devoted to the 
importance of education and the benefits of 
the military. 

These, although important, have little to 
do with multiculturalism. 

I'm not criticizing what the General had 
to say; however, it docs have its place, and 
that place is not International Week. 

Mat Henley 

freshman/park resources management 



Cutting government fat 
won't happen until 
we let go of Fort Riley 




Gorton 



The looming specter of 
Fort RHey's closure is 
bringing out the lib- 
eral in Kansas Republicans. 

They won't admit it, of course. 
Indeed, the trend is to link the base's 
fate to the larg- 
er issue of "the 
gutting of the 
military." 

Sen. Bob 
Dole, R-Kan., 
who is calling 
in favors in 
behalf of the 
fort, even tried 
to link the issue 
to the recent 
case of mistak- 
en identity in 
which 26 per- 
sons lost their 
lives aboard 
two U.S. heli- 
copters that were downed by friendly 
fire. 

Even if we were to assume the 
worst complaints about defense cuts 
were true, the Senator knows as well as 
t do that the fate of Fort Riley has little 
to do with the fighting capacity of the 
U.S. military. 

The fort sits in the middle of the 
nation as a relic of the so-called 
"Indian Wars." Its size and location 
makes both the training and deploy- 
ment of its troops inefficient. Dole 
calls the base "one of the best-kept 
secrets in the Army." But from what 
I've heard, it's no secret within the 
Army that Fort Riley is not exactly 
considered a "dream post." 

Besides, the First Infantry Division 
would not be disbanded, but rather 
moved to a location more in tune with 
the demands of a modern military. It is 
useless to argue the Division's history 
as a reason for Fort Riley's existence. 
All of the "Big Red I's" accomplish- 
ments this century have been earned 
where it has been sent, not where it is 
from If history is the argument, I'm 
sure that the upkeep for a museum 
could be found among the savings 
earned in the base's closure. 

The only unreplaceable aspect of 
the base is the effect it has on the local 
economy. If the fort's $560-million 
payroll were to hit the road, estimates 
have the loss of revenue at $51.8 mil- 
lion in Riley County and at $27.3 mil- 
lion in Geary County. As a life-long 
resident of "Manhappiness," 1 find this 
a quite sufficient reason to try to save 
the base, but the whole issue does 
illustrate the problem involved in "cut- 
ting the fat" from the federal budget. 

It's easy to sit back in Kansas, a 
state that claims a history of "rugged 



individualism," and howl about gov- 
ernment spending. It's easy to forget 
Kansas was settled thanks to the avail- 
ability of low-priced government lands 
appropriated in the "Indian Wars" 
more than 100 years ago (whan Fort 
Riley still had military significance.) 

It's easy to forget Kansas' modem 
wealth has a lot to do with things like 
farm subsidies, the Federal Interstate 
Highway System and an excellent, 
state- subsidized public university sys- 
tem. 

It's easy to forget that spending cuts 
in any area of government often have a 
profound effect on individuals and 
communities who have come — right 
or wrong — to rely on the revenue. 

It's easy to complain that the loss of 
$80 million in revenue to a couple of 
small towns is no excuse to hamper 
military readiness by clinging to an 
outdated facility. It's easy to complain 
— unless it's your base that is in jeop- 
ardy, then things take on a different 
light. 

The loss of Fort Riley would all but 
destroy Junction City — unless the 
Saturn Corp. decides to drop a plant 
from the sky. The transition back to a 
viable economy would be long and dif- 
ficult, if possible at all. 

Manhattan would fare better. Fewer 
businesses would go under, but all 
would see a drop in profits. As the real 
estate market opened up, property val- 
ues would go down. Students might 
find lower rents, but would also find 
fewer jobs with which to earn their 
rents. 

Sure, those areas ringing the fort 
would be spared the annoyance of mid- 
night training noises. But in general, 
the tax base of the area would be 
severely eroded, the job market would 
go to not. and the social decay that 
goes hand in hand with economic 
decay would be soon to follow. 

Local voters would be fools to just 
let the base leave without having some 
way of replacing it in the economic 
scheme of the area. A few extra tax 
dollars don't seem loo high a price to 
pay for the health of our communities. 
Welcome lo the pork barrel. Let's at 
least have the courage to look our self 
interest in the face and quit blaming 
some real or (in my opinion) imagined 
"gutting of the military" for what is 
probably — from the standpoint of 
government and military efficiency — 
the right decision to abandon the fort. 

Bob Dole is altempting lo bring 
home the bacon — nothing more, 
nothing less. 1 hope he succeeds, but 
I'd also like to see him call it what it 



Robert Gorton is a junior In history. 




TELL US WHAT YOU THINK 



We want to hear what you 
think. Upon submission, a stu- 
dent ID and phone number will 
be required. We also would like 
to know your year and major at 
K-State, if applicable. Letters 
may be edited for grammar and 
length. 



Utters to the 

Editor — 

c/o Denlse Clarkin 

Kansas State 

Collegian 

Kedzle Hall 116 

Manhattan, Kan. 

66506 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




I 



I 



UPC sponsors vigil 
to promote unity 

COLLBQUM ftW ■ . .. 

Collegian \ 

High winds Hied to diminish the candle light, but 
they did not diminish the spirit of the Free Your 
Mind Vigil that took place Monday night outside of 
the Union, 

The Union Program Council Multicultural com- 
mittee sponsored a candle light vigil to promote 
unity. 

'The whole idea behind Free Your Mind week is 
to get people to realize that we are all human 
beings, and we shouldn't be judged by our race, 
gender, or sexual preference." Sandy Hickman, 
sophomore in elementary education and committee 
member, said. 

The UPC conducted the candlelight vigil because 
it was something different, and it was something the 
UPC had never tried before. 

"We wanted to do something uniquely UPC. We 
wanted to do something that hasn't been done 
before," Mary Taylor, junior in psychology and 
committee chairperson, said. 

The multicultural committee brought in Carol 
Jauquet, psychologist at Lafene Health Center, who 
spoke about homosexuality, and Karren Baird- 
Olson, professor in sociology, who spoke about 
Native Americans. 

Jauquet said labeling is not good for people, and 
Olson said we need to listen to each other. 

"We do a tot of talking, and we don't listen to 
each other," Olson said. 

The UPC chose Jauquet and Olson to speak 
because they were experts on the issues the commit- 
tee wanted to stress. 

"There were certain issues we wanted to hit and 
they fit those issues," Taylor said. 

The candle vigil sparked interest among some of 
the students because of the unique approach the 
UPC took toward the program. 



Tto— da* Apr* 19. 1 



CAMPUS POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS 



Candidate backs technology 



TOUYAFOrrW 

CoHegiMi 

Telecommunications is a part of 
the future of rural development and 
education. 

Macie Houston, Republican can- 
didate for Secretary of State, said 
rural development in Kansas relies 
on technology. ' 

Technology is vital in Kansas," 
Houston said, "in order to grow in 
Kansas and in order to have jobs in 
Kansas." 

Houston spoke to the College 
Republicans in the K-State Union 
Monday. 

Houston said there needs to be 
more done with telecommunica- 
tions. The federal government 
needs to work with Kansas to arrive 
at a plan that is good for the state, 
she said. 

"I'm very strong on implement- 
ing a program that's strong for 
Kansas," Houston said. "Washing- 
ton is too out of touch." 

There should be regulations on 
basic telecommunications services, 
she said. 



"The only way we're going to 
see growth in Kansas is to provide 
technology," Houston said. "It is 
very crucial we take a look at tech- 
nology advancement in Kansas." 

Another point Houston said she 
thinks is important is voter registra- 
tion and responsibilities. 

High school juniors and seniors 
should be provided with education 
about the electoral process, she 
said. 

"What I would like to see is gov- 
ernment and partnership with 
sejioots," Houston said. "Many 
seniors turn 18. They need to be 
explained what the electoral 
process is all about." 

Technology for education is 
vital in Kansas. Houston said in 
many rural school districts, courses 
such as foreign language are not 
provided by a teacher, but they can 
be provided by telecommunica- 
tions. 

"I believe the great satisfaction 
politically is if every person is 
made aware of their own strengths 
in the electoral process," Houston 



said. "I would like to take that mes- 
sage throughout Kansas." 

Houston has a bachelor's degree 
in business administration from 
Saint Mary's College. She has 
worked for Telecommunications 
and Public Utility Regulations for 
21 years as an analyst. 




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PORTS 



ANOTHER ONE SKIPS GRADUATION 

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP)^Juwan Howard, the first of the Fab Rve, became the 
second to leave Michigan before graduating. 

Howard announced Monday he will pass up his seniof season with theWorverinea and 
enfer the NBA draft. Jalen Rose, another member of perhaps the best freshman class 
ever in college basketball, is expected to announce his (tens at a news conference today. 




L LEG1AN? 



Mike Gardner, 

Wildcat third 
baseman makasa 
ptay during the 
Nebraska game 
Sunday afternoon 
at Buck Bat tzar 
Fluid in Lincoln, 
Nab, The Cats 
loatthe 
game, 23-14. 

CARYCOMOVn 

CoMeglan 




Wildcats try to snap losing streak 



The Cats will 
play the 
Tigers In a 
two-game 
series at 
Simmons 
Field In 
Columbia, Mo. 



swam AMPaaaoH 

camaai 

The K-State baseball team will 
begin a two-game series with the 
Missouri Tigers at 7 p.m. today at 
Simmons Field in Columbia, Mo. 

The Wildcats, 1 1-28 overall and 2- 
15 in the Big Eight Conference, hope to 
end a nine-game losing streak — their 
longest losing skid since last season. 

The Tigers (26-12, 6-7 in the league) 
are on a three-game winning streak 
after beating Southern Illinois- 
Edwardsville 17-4, Rockhurst 11-3 and 
Westminster 14-4 at home. 



Coach Mike Clark said it seems 
every team K-State plays is on a win- 
ning streak. 

"It seems like when we go against 
somebody, they are on a roll," Clark 
said after the 23-14 loss to Nebraska on 
Sunday. 

Missouri took three games from K- 
State from April 8-10 at Frank Myers 
Field. The Tigers won by scores of 5-2, 
8-2 and 8-2. 

Shane Hicks (0-1, 7.03 earned run 
average) is K-State's starter for 
tonight's game. 

During Sunday's game. Hicks 



pitched 3-1/3 innings, striking out four 
and giving up four hits. 

Hicks will face one of the better hit- 
ters in the Big Eight in David 
Sanderson. 

Sanderson is hitting .382 with three 
home runs and 27 RBI. In conference 
play, he leads the league in doubles 
with five. 

Missouri did not name a starting 
pitcher, but lefthander Greg Lindstrom 
is scheduled to pitch in the rotation. 
Lindstrom is 4-1 with a 3.88 ERA. 

He pitched six innings in the second 
8-2 game in Manhattan. 



INTRAMURAL SPORTS 



Softball teams try 
to get back on schedule 



WWSS HUDBLSO W 

Collefiin 

After rain, wind and snow, the 
intramural softball season continues 
at 4:30 p.m. today at the Chester E. 
Peters Recreation Complex. 

Regularly scheduled games, as 
well as make-up games, are sched- 
uled to be played every day through 
Saturday. 

Games will start at 5:30, 6:30 
and 7:15 p.m. in addition to the 
4:30 p.m. start times. 

"We're trying to get as many 
games in as possible while the 
weather is still nice," Bryan 
Skinner, assistant director of recre- 
ational services, said. 

Saturday, action begins at 1 1 
a.m. and runs as long as the weather 
and sunlight permit. Skinner said. 

"We've kind of hodgepodged the 
make-up games in wherever there 
was room," Skinner said. 

Skinner said the softball playoffs 
are tentatively planned for April 27. 

"Nothing has been decided per- 
manently. You never know what 
the weather will do," Skinner said. 

Sunday, 29 teams competed for 
the all-University free-throw cham- 
pionship at the Rec Complex. 



Each shooter on the four-mem- 
ber teams was given 50 shots from 
the free- throw line during the con- 
test. 

Jeff Kroening buried 49 of his 50 
attempts to take the individual 
championship. 

Jason Smith, Jake Powell, 
Kroening and Brian Stratum of Pi 
Kappa Alpha made 1 76 of their 200 
shots to capture the all-University 
title. 

"I never made that many in my 
life, and I probably won't ever 
again," Kroening said. 

The Pikes had a free-throw con- 
test of their own and took the top- 
four shooters in the all-University 
contest, Kroening said. 

Kappa Alpha Theta won the 
women's division. Kristen 
Falkenberg, Ashley Lehman, 
Sandra Beer and Christina Frick 
combined to hit 161. 

Falkenberg, who hit 45, won the 
women's division. 

Haymaker Four took home the 
residence-hall championship by 
making 102. 

The Tau Kappa Epsilon 
Independant team won the indepen- 
dent division with 1 13. 



INTRAMURAL SOFTBALL TOP 10 


Here are the present Top 10 teams for the K-State men's, women's and eo-rec 


intramural softbal teams. 




Man's 


Women's Co-Rec 


1. Playground SuSes (JO) 


l.Gaton(JO) 1. Gam (1-0) 


LMSMMasJJM) 


ZSeoorame(2-Q) 2AHJCanHsndte (1-0) 


IDataUpsaxHt-O) 


3. Kappa Kappa Gamma (1-0) aGeete(40) 


4.SmetyF«tz{+0} 


4. Short Mysters (2-0) 4, BmJAntfcn (44) 


S. Sigma Nu (1-0) 


5. Kappa Akta Theta (44) S.fH1aoos (30) 

6, Gamma PWBeta (1-0) aKYStttJerks (00) 


6. Lambda CN Alpha (1-0) 


7.0a Boys (44) 


7AlphaOetaPi(0-0) 7 Softefc (2-0) 


8. Sigma Ch (14) 


& Moon 8 (04) ftJemesGang r44) 


9. Spend (Wj 


S. The Qrts (24) 9.E-100) 


19.Uoaeap4) 


•epwi Qes*dere (2-1) laSpsed (44) 




ONarWT1(A^--ArJyol1lclaiMy8 
Marge Schott is gc4ng to have lo pay i' she 
Keeps puffing away, 

The Cincinnati Reds owner plana lo 
continue smoking In her seat at Riverfront 



Stadium In defence of the rj/i new anti- 
smoMng law. Violators can be fined f 104, 

City officials want lo avoid a confronta- 
tion, but mey/re not going to let her flout the 
law, council member Todd Portune said. 



AHEARN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



Memorabilia auction scheduled 
to raise money for fund 



The auction 
to benefit the 
Mike Ahearn 
Scholarship 
fund will 
offer 

autographed 
footballs, 
basketballs 
and Copper 



cwhsai 

You've seen K-State 
memorabilia in your favorite 
Aggieville establishments, 
but you too could be the next 
proud owner of a piece of 
Wildcat history. 

The Kansas State Auction, 
now in its 1 0th year, will be 
auctioning off a variety of 
Cat collectors' items begin- 
ning at 5:30 p.m. on April 29 
at the Manhattan Holiday 
Inn's main ballroom. 

All proceeds benefit the 
Mike Ahearn Scholarship 
Fund, which supports K-State 
student-athletes. During its 
existence, the auction has 
raised more than $423,000 
for the fund. 

Erick Harper, director of 
advertising for the 
Department of Intercollegiate 
Athletics, said there will be 
something for every Cat fan 
at the auction. 

"We'll have autographed 
K-State footballs, basketballs 
and photos, as well as jerseys 
signed by Ski Jones and 
Chiefs' tight end Keith 
Caih," Harper said. "There 
will also be a lot of Copper 
Bow! items and things donat- 
ed from local businesses and 
alums being auctioned off." 

Harper added that every- 
one attending wilt be able to 
purchase items in both the 
live and silent auctions, with 
the live auction taking place 
around 8:00 p.m. 



Those in attendance will 
also have the opportunity to 
meet many of the athletic 
department personnel and 
coaches who will be in atten- 
dance throughout the 
evening. 

Matt McMillen, K-State 
associate athletic direc- 
tor/external affairs, said he's 
excited about this year's 
event. 

"There were a record num- 
ber of items donated this 
year," McMillen said. 

"We're really expecting a 
great turnout, with everyone 
excited about our football 
season and new basketball 
coach. We're looking for- 
ward to it." 

After a year's absence, 
another Ahearn fundraising 
event is back. 

A golf tournament at the 
Rolling Meadows Golf 
Course in Junction City will 
begin with registration at 8 
a.m. on April 29. 

The tournament is limited 
to 120 golfers, and April 22 is 
the deadline for registration. 

Format for the tournament 
will be a five- person scram- 
ble, with one K-State celebri- 
ty per group of five. 

The three top teams will 
receive cash prizes, with the 
remaining cash going into the 
scholarship fund. 

Any questions regarding 
the tournament may be 
directed to Jack Key at (913) 
532-6913. 



TENNIS 



Netters lose season finale 



CRAIG PiHKERTON 



Colkgidn 

It was an all too-familiar tune that the 
women's tennis team heard on Monday. 

The netters dropped their final regular 
season contest to the Oklahoma Sooners, 
9-0, in Norman, Okla. 

The loss marked the seventh time this 
season that the netters have been blanked 
by their opponent. 

The loss against the No. 31 Sooners 
dropped the netters' record to 4-17 on the 
season, 1-6 in conference action. 

Despite the lopsided scores, the 
matches were closer than they might 
appear. 

"The scores don't tell the whole 
thing," Coach Steve Bietau said. "I think 






[he matches we did the best in, the scores 
don't show it." 

In No. 1 singles. Summer Ruckman 
dropped her match against Nicole 
Kenneally 6-1, 6-0. Marline Shrubsole 
fell to Jenny DclVallc in a hard-fought 
match 6-3. 6-2 in No. 2 singles. Nikki 
Lagerstrom and Brooke Brundige 
dropped their matches 6-1. 6-2 in No. 3 
and No. 4 singles, respectively. 

The Sooners also swept through the 
doubles portion of the match winning 6- 
1, 6-2 in No. I doubles and 6-3, 6-4 in 
No. 2 doubles. 

Once again, the Wildcats were forced 
to play without a full squad. The match 
marked the 10th time this season that the 
netters were unable to field a full team 



due to injury and illness. 

The personnel shortage has forced 
some players to play in higher positions 
than they normally would. 

"We had a good effort, but we had the 
same problem," Bietau said. "We are 
playing too few, too high. 

"They are making a good effort, 
though." . 

The Cats will return to Oklahoma on 
Friday for the Big Eight Championships 
in Oklahoma City. 

It may be a totally different team that 
makes the return trip, though. 

The Cats may take a full team for the 
first time since late March as Karen 
Nicholson and Alex Thome are hoping to 
return to the lineup. 

The netters, who will hold the No. 7 
seed, will face the second-seeded Kansas 
Jayhawks in the first round of the double- 
elimination tournament. 



Long injury list marks tennis team's season 



I 



I 



The big story this year for 
the women's tennis team it 
what has happened, off the 
court rattier than on the 
court. 

What was considered to 
be a bright season for the 
neltcgre was dimmed some- 
what: by (ha injury bug. 

Early In the season. NIWo 
Lageritrotn mined three 
matches because of illness 
bat was able to return. 

• *ce Feb. 25, Kartna 

Kuregian hasn't been able to 

play because of s back 

rcgisn who WW 

tanked as one of the top 

aaVHasal 



players in the country, will 
not be able to return to the 
lineup 

Kriregian's status remains 
up in the air. A trip to a neu- 
rosurgeon this week will 
help make any decisions 
about what needs so be done, 

'We arc just trying lo get 
the beat information wo can 
from the best people we 
can," Coach Steve Bielau 
said "All I know is mat I've 
learned a lot about backs in 
the last month," 

Bietau is hoping that 
Kuregian and her faintly are 
able to make a decision aa 
soon as possible. 

hope the is able to 



make a decision in the neat 
few weeks," Bietau said. 
"But the most important 
thing is to find the option 
that gives ber the chance to 
return.'* 

Ksrea Nicholson and 
Alex Theme have missed the 
last month because of ill- 
nesses. Both of team arc 
hoping to return to the line- 
up before the Big Eight 
Chsmptoiiitups 

Coming back after miss* 
ing s good portion of the 
season won't be easy. 

"H is going to be duTiculi 
coming back after sot play 
ing for so long." Nicholson 



Thome agrees thai tl 
long layoff isn't going tc 
make it easy to comeback, 

"If you're sick for 
month, the most difficul 
thing is Just coming back." 
Thome said. 

'You have lost so much 
conditioning ." 
• Having more people in 
the lineup for the tournament 
will not only be good for the 
team but also for Nicholson 
and Thome. 

"For the sake of the play- 
ers who have been able to 
play. I hope they get back 
because it gives them a bet- • 
ter chance to win." Bietau 
tajej 





IVERSIONS 







CROSSWORD 



Eugene Shotei 



ACROSS 
1 Clarinct- 
tot'a 
d«vk» 

5 Spotted 
• Water pip* 
12Desif. 
13 Promppt 
14'— tha 

Mood for 

Love" 
18 NYSE 
17 Fasti va 
IS Absolutely 
19Cors«t- 

shopbuy 

20 Prison 
guard, 
slang iry 

21 Tarzan't 
offspring 

22 Scfoogean 
shout 

23Fibar- 

ywkting 

shrub 
28 Billy of 

'Carousel" 

30 Couturier 
Cassini 

31 Brad- 
strMt's 
partner 

32 Green 
land 

33 'Sesame 



Street* 
denizen 
35 Skiers' 



36 Seine stuff 

37 "Ta-ttl" 

38 Disdain 

41 CoHm (si.) 
42-aiai 
45 August 

(Fr.) 
48VIPs 

48 Cilium 

49 Flightless 
bird 

50 Malefcent 

51 Song- 
stress 
James 

52 Patrol 

53 Apportion- 



DOWN 

1 July stone 

2 Huron's 
neighbor 

3 Quiche 
maker's 
needs 

4 She's on 
her way 
out 

5 Frkjhtan- 



11 Corrode 
10 Hautboy 

20 Lose 
firmness 

21 Cannon 
Of W.W.I 

22 Crib 

23 Fitch 

24 Clay, 
today 

15 Actress 
Ryan 



• Emanation 26 Rbaa, onoa 



7 Become 
ona 

8 Important 
parson 

»Gen. 

Bradley 
10Cleo's 
waterway 



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28 Raw rock 

29 Cyst 
31 Joanna 

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35 Favorable 
votes 

37 Phony 

38 Vendition 

39 Cover 
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40 Expel 

41 Iwo — 

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MOUSETRAP MIGHT BE SPRING. 

Today's Qyptoqup Clue: X equals G 



Marketers, bar start Bull Rodeo 



The first Bull Rodeo, 
sponsored. by Silverado 
Saloon and Pi Sigma 
Epiilon. will be at 7 
tonight at Silverado 
Saloon. 

"People should 
expect a fun, eventful 
night interacting with 
new friends and chal- 
lenging their ability to 
stay on the bull," Shane 
Scott junior in market- 
ing and PSE chapter 
president, said. 

The local western 
bar and PSE. a K- Stale 
marketing fraternity, 
presents Manhattan with 
its first mechanical bull 
rodeo. Contestants will 



receive two rides for 
$ 10, and if they pre- reg- 
ister at Silverado before 
Tuesday at 7 p.m., the 
fee will be $8 for two 
rides. 

"The rodeo will start 
at 7 p.m., and we will 
have different levels of 
competition ranging 
from beginner to 
expert," he said. "Prizes 
include trophy buckles, 
tanning sessions, gift 
certificates and more." 

It is also possible for 
members of a living 
group, such as a resi- 
dence hall floor or fra- 
ternity, to compete 
among themselves. 



SNIPPETS 

WOMEN HOLD PURSE 
STRINGS IN RELATIONS 

In a nationwide survey of 2,021 adults, 
Oppenheimer Management Corp. found that most 
women mamed or living with someone were solely 
responsible tor: 

60% balance the 56% pay the bills 

checkbook 



jourcs: Wichita Eagfe 



DOUBLE-BARREL1D 



D«yl Blah/Collecwn 



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pair 'of WiWtS. 



KATW WALKErVCotoglan 





CALVIN AND HOBBES 



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WAS K LOCAL HOUSEHOLD IK 
HER IRON GRIP OF TOSS*.' 

THE MM C* MLW-HlGHl 
ZOOHS TO THE RESCUE' 




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GIRL tS MOMEHTWIM 




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tEAM, l'W Q<£K AT WE UVUE 
MOHSTtRS HOWSE AGNM. 
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Girlfriend wants to hex beau's ex 



Write to Caasandra 
1f6 Kedzla Hall 
Manhattan, Kan. 



Dear Cassandra, 

Lately my boyfriend's ex-girl- 
friend has been coming around a 
lot. 

It's been causing a lot of prob- 
lems between us. 

It's not like we just started 
going out because we've been 
seeing each other for a year this 
month. I know he loves me and 
would never hurt me. 

My problem is that she is con- 
stantly calling, going to his apart- 
ment and has even called me. 
How can I make this stop? 

I'm not a violent person, and I 
hate to argue. Better yet, what 
can my boyfriend do or say tp get 
the point across to her that he no 



longer wants to go out with her 
— that he is past that and has 
moved on? 

I honestly think she's 
obsessed. I know she could get a 
date with almost anybody. So, 
that's not her problem. Please 
help! 

Signed, 
Desperate 

Dear Desperate, 

Here are a coupte of fun 
things to do to give her the mes- 
sage thai your boyfriend is done 
with her. 

/ When your boyfriend is 
over at your house, give her a 



call and say this: 

"Hey, is MY boyfriend over 
there '.' No, 1 guess that's because 
he's MY boyfriend and not 
youra!" 

• When she shows up to visit 
your boyfriend, do this: Wrap 
your arms around him and give 
him a big deep kiss and say: 

"Boy, MY boyfriend sure is a 
good kisser. When was the last 
nme you kissed him? Really, that 
long? It must be because he is 
not your boyfriend, and he is 
MINE!" 

• Or if she shows up to talk, 
grab his hand and shout: 

"MY boyfriend! MY 
boyfriend! MY boyfriend!" 



Summer Employment 
Johnson County 



Clerical Positions 

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Word Processors 

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Receptionists 

Bank Tellers (exp) 



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(913)364-6161 

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Applications accepted Mon-Fri 9-3 p.m. 



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Releases offer 
fresh fkes, 
incarnations 





Collegian 

Ouiruaw Kicteru 

"Pop Hcircu" 

** 1/2 - Lmenable 

The Chainsaw Kittens, 
out of Norman. Okla., 
refine punk energy into a 
more palatable arrange- 
ment. 

"Pop Heiress," the 
band's latest release, marks 
the Okie's entry info the national scene. 

The record is an expertly produced mirror of 
the Kitten's diverse styles. The band is just as 
comfortable playing hfavy punk songs as it is 
slowing down for an acoustic number. 

The music of Chainsaw Kittens is punk-tin 
ven guitar, with an occasional midweslern- fla- 
vored acoustic arrangement. Trent J. Bell fills 
"Pop Heiress" with plenty of distorted, loud gui- 
tar material, while all others just seem to follow 
his lead. The vocals of Tyson Todd Meade often 
rise above Ihe mix, making "Pop Heiress" a very 
listenable, hard rock album. 

Rolliru Band 
"Weight" 
'*#* = Pretty cool 

The Rollins Band returns 
with another offering of 
an gry. guitar-driven rock, 

Henry Rollins, once of 
Ihe '80s punk outfit Black 
Flag, has shortened his 
name to just Rollins. 

Rollins has not shortened anything from the 
Rollins Band's thick sound on "Weight," the 
band's sixth full-length album. The new album 
further separates Rollins from his hardcore past, 
as some songs sound almost mainstream, at least 
until Rollins starts screaming in his low. 
resounding voice. 

SftUUKC 

"Riddlei Are Abound Tonight" 
XII 1/2 itan » Pretty cool 

Sausage reunites the 
original members of San 
Francisco's now mega- 
stars. Primus. 

Sausage was the name of 
Primus' first demo tape, and 
it is now a project from 
Primus bassist Les Claypool and old Primus 
band mates Todd Huth (guitars, vocals) and Jay 
Lane (drums). "Riddles are Abound Tonight" 
marks the first lime the three have played togeth- 
er in five years. 

The record sounds a lot like a Primus record, 
with all songs built on the masterful buss lines of 
Claypool. 

Lyrically, Sausage tends to lean a little more 
on the serious side than Primus, often postponing 
lyrics to extended, funky jams. When Claypool 
or Huth do decide to take the microphone, the 
result is a very dark look at real life, a different 
outlook that fans of Primus may be looking for. 

The album's historical high point comes on 
'Toyz 1988," an older arrangement of "The Toys 
arc Winding Down" from Primus' early album 
"Fizzle Fry." 

"Riddles are Abound Tonight" is an excellent 
look at Primus' early years. Many of Primus' 
nuances can be picked up from this release, like 
its strong bass and fast, distorted guitar bursts 
with drums following behind. The album is not 
without its lighter moments, such as on "Girls for 
Single Men," a look at dating, love and sex. 

"Riddles" also includes some of the best non- 
jazz instrumental music to be released in recent 
years. The album's final song, "Caution Should 
Be Used When Operating Heavy Machinery" 
combines another extended Claypoot-Huth-Lane 
jam session with samples of power tools and 
heavy machinery, resulting in a wall of sound 
worth the price of the album alone. 





in each of us 



r the kid 



8 



Tto— day. April 19. 1894 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Private law school opens in Wichita 



"Wear* 
determined 
to get 

accredited 
before any 
student 
graduates." 

Thomas Laltrino 

Dean of the 

President's College 

School of Law 



CMsJM 

A new private law school 
will be begin classes June 6 in 
Wichita. 

Thomas Laurino, dean of 
President's College School of 
Law, said it is time Wichita 
had a law school. 

"Outside Las Vegas, 
Wichita is the largest city in 
the country without a law 
school," Laurino said, "The 
trustees decided now is the 
right lime because if they 
wanted a law school in 
Wichita, they knew they 
would have to do it them- 
selves." 

'Classes will be in the 
evening for the first two years 
that the school is open, 
Laurino said. 

"We are starting off as a 



night program because of our 
target students — , people who 
have wanted to go to law 
school for a long time, but 
have kids or work," he said. 

"Our plan calls for a switch 
to a day program within two 
years." 

Laurino said the school is 
not yet accredited by the 
American Bar Association, 
but he expects the school to 
be accredited within 3 1/2 
years after opening. 

"Unfortunately, that's the 
way the system is," he said. 
"The ABA will not allow a 
school to apply for the accred- 
itation process until it's been 
open for one complete year." 

He said that's another rea- 
son why the school is only 
going to be open part-time. 

"We are determined to get 



accredited before any student 
graduates," Laurino said. "I 
don't anticipate any problems 
with accreditation, but there is 
a risk involved for incoming 
students. We live and die by 
accreditation." 

Laurino said the law school 
will eventually be able to 
accommodate 450 students, 
but can only accept 1 SO at this 
point. 

"Our goal is to accept 150 
students per year," he said. 
"We don't actually anticipate 
150 this year because we are 
just getting off the ground. 
We would be delighted with 
1 50 this year." 

Jim Conconnon, dean of 
the law school at Washburn 
University in Topeka, said he 
does not expect to lose many, 
if any, students to the new 



school in Wichita. 

"It's the case in Kansas 
and almost every other state 
that to take the Bar exam you 
must be a graduate of an 
American Bar Association 
accredited law school," he 
said. 

"I don't think many people 
are willing to relocate to 
enroll in an unaccredited, 
part-time program." 

Conconnon said California 
will allow graduates of unac- 
credited law schools to take 
the Bar exam, but he also said 
California's exam scores are 
traditionally lower than other 
states' scores. 

The cost of attending 
President's College School of 
Law is $300 per credit hour. 
Washburn, which is a public 
university, charges $173 per 



Debate team earns honors 



Collegian 

The debate and individual- 
events forensic* teams earned 
'national recognition when they 
both finished within the top three 
teams in the nation in early April. 

Sue Stanfield, director of 
debate and the team coach, said 
approximately 250 teams com- 
peted in the national debate con- 
test. 

David Devereaux, senior in 
speech communication, compel-, 
ed against a student from 
Michigan State to claim K- 
State's overall second place fin- 
ish. 

"He had the highest points 
anyone's ever gotten at the 
national tournament," Stanfield 
said. 

Each member is judged indi- 
vidually, Taleyna Beadles, senior 



in radio and television, said. The 
judge then decides how well the 
person debated. 

Beadles said an average score 
is 26 or 27 out of 30 possible 
points, and a score of 28 or 29 it 
exceptional. 

Stanfield said that Devereaux 
scored a perfect 30 in three 
rounds. His total score was 233 
points out of 240. 

Beadles and her teammate 
Courtney Knapple, freshman in 
speech, placed within the top 64 
overall. 

"Everyone competes in eight 
rounds," Beadles said. "We won 
five and lost three," 

The individual-events foren- 
sics team also competed well at 
their national contest. They 
earned third place out of 106 
schools and over 500 competi- 
tors. 




r 



Attention Creative Writing 



i ii » i -s\ 



:« 






All sections of English 410, 

Intro to Creative Writing 

are OPEN. 






^ 



OB l&XQfltt Of WUMHI i 



Ahmad S. Abdulrahman of 
DIS IS IT 

Tuesday, April 19, 6 p.m. 
CALVIN HALL ROOM 102 

• Elections, May 3, 6 p.m. C102 




beginning Fall 1994 in the 
t last long. If you want to 
the Study Abroad Office, 
1698) immmdiatmly. 



A < 3JWMBIA, CZECH 

PUB! JC, ES ipSTIA FINLAND, 
E, GERMWY, ITALY, KOREA 
JPPI ISJWTHERLANDS, RUSSIA, 
iDEN, URUGUAY. 
Many if not most of these offer instruction in English. 



AUDITIONS 



i tiers lh.it .i 



*li (Thiol's 



K-STATE SINGERS 

Voices: Soprano, Alio, K*nor. Uriss 

MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

Musii tits | in-. ( ivJn 

WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 

Mini -MN- 1 hr ( ivdil 
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LASSIFIEDS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



OUR BASIC RATE 

To run 20 tfordt or left tor on day 
It 16. For tach wort over 20 odd 20c 
p« word. CaJI 532-6555 lor consecutive 
dtyraHt. 



DEADLINES 

Classified edt must be placed by 
noon the day before Ihe d*(t the ad 
runt. Ctattlted dltoity tdt mutt be 
placed by 4 p.m. two working dtyi 
before the data the ad rune. 



HOW TO MY 

AM ctattifledt mutt be paid III 
advance unlets you have an 
etUUtthed account with Student 
PubNcatktfta. Cash, chock, UaeterCarf 
or Vital 



Call 532-6555 
to place your classified. 



K -STATE UNION 




PARKING 

SOUTH OF THE 
UNION 



OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 8 a.m.-5 p.m. (except holiday?) 



WNen«ii«ottaj»ioW^t^0o»^p^iM^ 



ooo 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 



Announcements 



■HOWARD STERNS" need 

ed for co-ho»ti or pro- 
duction ttaff po*ition* 
for the talk- radio show 
-A Purple Affair.* Appli 
cation a available at the 
SGA Office or DB92 *tu 
diot I McCain 3171. 

ADVANCED fUGHT Train- 
ing. Multrengine pel- 
vate. commercial, or 
ATP In Twin Comanche 
with HSI. RMI, GPS, 
Storm Scope. Hugh Ir- 
vin. 539 31 28 

AUOHI VIDEO GAMES 

Bur- ■*" trede. Ninten- 
do- Sege- all systems. 
Game Guy 837-0989 
709 N 13th, Aggievllle. 

COME FLY with ut, K- State 
Flying Club haa five sir- 
planet. For beat price* 



call Troy Brockway, 
776-6735 after 5:30p.m. 

SEND EROTIC atoriet to 
Dear Chrla. If your 
ttory It uaed in our col- 
umn, you can win S'OO 
instantly Mail to Chrla 
Robert, 1603 Falrchlld. 

tool 



We require ■ form of 
picture ID (KSU, driv- 
•r'a license or other} 
when piecing ■ per- 



TO HEATHER- Our favor- 

tte certdy counter red- 
head Happy 2 let Birth- 
day I Where would we 
be without you? Prob 
ably home etudying. 
Truce- Meek. MoFo. 
Ethel. Welly, and Dot. 



MMttragt/ 



GOLDEN KEY chapter 

meeting Tueeday, 19th, 
at 6:30p.m In Union 
111. Presidential Run- 
Off Debate sponsored 
by Golden Kay follow* 



at 730pm. 
Room. 



in the Big's 



Parttes-n-More 



CREATE HOT wet memo- 
ries with your next par- 
ty. Wet H Wild Mobile 
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1 




HOUSING/ 
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AVAILABLE NOW, tum- 
mer end tall. Very nice 
two, throe and 
four-bedroom apart- 
ment complexes and 
houess Near cam put 
with great price* 
537-1666, 537-2919 



LARGE TWO and 

three- bed room apart 
ment* Furnished Or uo 
turnithed. Close to 
camput. Available June 
1 and Aug. 539-1713 
after 4p.m. 



LARGE TWO and 

throe- bedroom a part - 

ment* close to campus. 
Aggieville end City 
Park. Available June t. 
539-1713. 



TWO, THREE and 
four-bedroom. Vary 
good condition. Wind- 
ow air, ga* heat and 
carpeted. Available In 
June. 537-7334. 



TWO-BEDROOM, LUXURI- 
OUS apartment* near 
camput and opposite 
City park at 1100 Fre- 
mont for. June or Au- 
gutl. Carpeted, central 
air, dishwasher and dl* 
potal. No pett. 1485 
537^)428 



UTILITIES PAID on tome 
apartment* on* or 
two-bedrooma, fur- 
nlehed or un turnithed. 
10 or 12 month lease* . 
June or Aug. Quiet for 
ttudy. No patt. 
637-8389 



110| 

For Ren t - 
Apt. 

Unfurnished 



AVAILABLE IMME- 

DIATELY, nice two bed 
room, 617 N. 12th, 
$575, water, traah paid. 
Clote to camput. 776- 
3B04. 



AUCVST LEASES 


'InMi Apti. elaleBBaa' *i*> 


•l.*»-H«*i. 


1 Jirsf 2 hVdriHHn Unit* 


S3 7-9064 


VrrkiUy V • ra -4:30 p.m. 



AVAILABLE JUNE I. 
One-bedroom 1340. 
two-bedroom 1510 
1866 College Height*. 
Water/ trethpeid. Clote 
to camput. 776-3804 

AVAILABLE NOW, 

one-bedroom. 1022 
Suntet, $349. Water' 
traah paid. Clota to 
camput. 776-3804. 

AVAILABLE NOW, tum- 
mer and fall. Very nice 
two, three and 
four-bedroom apart- 
ment complexes and 
houaet. Near camput 



wilh 
537-16 



great price*. 
| 537-2919. 



AVAILABLE NOW. 

three-bedroom, clote 
to City Park. 300 N. 
11th, $436 Upstair, 
unit. Water/ treah paid. 
776-3904. 

AVAILABLE NOW, 

two-bedroom by City 
Park. 1026 Osage $495 
Water/ treth paid. 
776-3804. 

AVAILABLE NOW. Spa- 
clout two-bedroom. 

Clota to camput. 1829 
Collage Heights $680 
Water/ traah paid. 
776-3804. 

CHASE MANHATTAN 
APARTMENTS OFF 
IRS YOU ALL THE 
COMFORTS OF NEW: 

modem Interior*, dlth- 
waahara, microwave*, 
clubhouse with swim- 
ming pool, aun deck, 
laundry, lounge, and 
workout facllltie* in- 
cluding steirmasters, 
exercise bikaa, weight*, 
and TVI Occupancy 
neering 100 percent. 
Don't mlt* outl Celt to- 
day I 776-3663 

FOUR BEDROOM APART- 
MENT in houee on Men 
Kalian Ave. acrot* 
from Univeralty. With 
weeher end dryer. Very 



nice and very reason- 
able. 539-8804 

JUNE AND Aug. availabili- 
ty. One, two and 
four-bedroom 1017- 
1029 McCollum $365- 
$800. Close to camput 
776-3804. 

LUXURY NEXT to Cempue 

three-bedroom, two 
bathe, washer, dryer, 
central air. parbege dis- 
posal, parking, no pets 
Available June $750. 
537-8543. 

NEXT TO campua. Nice 
two, three-bedroom 
apartment with washer, 
dryer, central air, no 
pet* Available Aug. 
$450- $850 537-8543 

NOW LEASING lor Aug. 
1001 Bluemont $780. 
Vory large two-bed- 
room, two bath. Nice 
unite. Clota to Ag- 
gieville. 776-3804. 

ONE AND two-bedroom 

apartment* convenient 
to camput available 
June 1 end Aug. 1. 
$390- $450. Reference* 
requested, no smoking 
or pot* please Borat 
Restoration 776-1460 

ONE-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE April 16 1232 
Laramie $325. All utili- 



ties paid. Close to cam- 
pus. 776-3804 

ONE-BEDROOM BASE 
MENT apartment. 820 
Osage $210. Available 
April 15. Water/ trash 
paid. 776-3804. 

OVERLOOK CAMPUS, two- 
bedroom . dishwasher, 
fireplace, laundry lecilt 
ty. Available Aug. 1. 
$610. 537-2256. 

■•AUK PLACE APART 
MINTS. Now p re-leas 
ing one, two and 
three-bedrooms. 
539-2951 

ROOMMATE: NEEDED for 
four-bedroom/ two 
bath. Available Aug. 6 
Woodway Apartments, 
$194 a month, 
one-fourth utilities. Aak 
for Steve, Tony, or 
Brlen 537-7677. 

THREE-BEDROOM APART 

MENT in house on Man 
hattan Ave. ecrott 
from Univartlty. With 
waaher and dryer. Vary 
nice and vary reason 
able. 539-8804. 

TWO-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE in June. 11 28 Fre- 
mont S610. Trash paid 
Dishwasher, garbage 
ditpoeal. laundry fecill 
titt on-site Clote to 






City Park and 

gieville. 776-3804 



Ag 



TWO-BEDROOM, ONE 
block watt camput. 
nice, $500 month in- 
cludes all bills, lease, no 
pett. no smoking. June 
1,776-1714. 

TWO THREE-BEDROOMS 
one and one- half bath, 
central air, laundry, 
near campua, available 
June or Aug. 537-8800. 



TWO, TWO- bedroom 
apartments. $585 par 
month. One month da 
posit includes treah and 
lawn care. Waahar and 
dryer hook- upa, »p 
phancee. central air end 
neat, two full bath* 
Leaae* begin Mey 1 or 
June 30. Cell 539-8800. 



TWO BEOROOM. WATER, 
gat, traah paid. Off 
street parking Waahar/ 
dryer available. June 1. 
539-6678 



VERY NICE four-bedroom 
house avsllsble May I, 
1817 Collage Haighta. 
$1200. All utilities paid 
Clote to ctmpu* 
776-3804 



~M*~ 



» ■ a i hi ' i i ■ ■ ■ — ^a»f**«i 



f**p 



^seaspar— w_ ■ipiiia 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tu— day, April 1», 1—4 Q 



Collegian Classifieds 



■ 



FOUR AND/ or flve-bed- 
room ho us* for rant, 
921 Kearney, unfur 
niihad, central haat/ 
air, washer/ dryer, 
$825- 075. Call Olrin 
537-0*74 

NON-DRINKING AND 
smoktno,, for two and 
three-bedroom place*. 
No pat*. References. 
539-1564. 



QUIT PAYINd RENTI 
Nlca older horn* cur- 
rantty duplax. Three 
bedrooms plus and »tu 
dio with HW7 aolar. 
Converts to large noma 
Of Way a* is and EARN 
HINT. Closa to park, 
downtown and KSU 
Studants take this to 
your parents. 1-800- 
693 0519 After 7p.m. 
Pricad In tfw 60'*. 



1982 COMMODORE 14X65 
two-bedroom, on* 
bath, large living room, 
refrigerator, range, 
new washer and dryer. 
Must see to appreciate. 
Colonial Gardens lot 
#118. Available May 
16th 110,500, 587-0608 
or 537-7759. 

COUNTRYSIDE BROKER 

AGE will aall your mo- 
bile home for you. We 
have fantastic results 
Wa do our own financ- 
ing. Call 539-2325 



1481 



Roommate 



FEMALE ROOMMATE for 
summer needed to 
share fully furnished 
two-bedroom apart- 
ment. 5250/ month. Wa- 
ter/ trash paid. No pet* 
778-9858 Heather. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed to occupy one 
room of three-bed 
room , apartment in 
Woodttay Complex. 
One year lease begin- 
ning Aug. 1. Apartment 
faces brand new pool, 
5208 Please call 
538-2138 or 778-9587 

MALE ROOMMATES 

needed to help share a 
three bedroom house. 
539-3726 

MALE ROOMMATE need 
*d to share a four- bed- 
room house. Close to 
campus. 1150 a month 
plus utilities. Laundry 
facilities. Call 776-4546. 

NEED FEMALES to share a 
summer aubleaea on a 
three-bedroom apart- 
ment Furnished, water/ 
trash paid. Very closa 
to campua. Call 
778-2256. 

NEED NON-SMOKING 
male roommate for 
one-bedroom in nice 
five-bedroom house, 
thing 
. : bed r i 
month plus shared utili 
tie*. 587-0380. 

NON-SMOKING FEMALE 
roommate wanted for 
summer. 5225 month 
ona-hslf utilitiea. 
Two-bedroom house 
two and one- half blocks 
from campus No pets. 
776-7636 

NON-SMOKING FEMALE 
roommate wanted to 
share very nice two- 
bedroom apartment 
with Architecture major 
student, starting in 
June or Aug. own 
room, washer/ dryer. 
$220 a month plus one- 
half utilities. Call 539 
1874 or leave message 

NON-SMOKING FEMALE 
to share two-bedroom 
house. Two and one- 
half blocks from cam- 
pus. 5200 month one- 
half utilities. Fall seme* 
ter. No pets. 776-7638. 

ROOMMATE WANTED 
own bedroom in 

two- bedroom E. High 
way 24. May 1 $192 50 
—■ r Pet* OK, 537-2290 
ROOMMATES WANTED, 
own room, washer/ dry- 
er, next to campua, Ag- 
gievilla. $142/ month 
plua utilities. Call 
539-1289 



Everything furniahad 
except bedroom $200.' 



WANTED NON-SMOKING 
and jton-dr Inking male 
for basement furnished 
privet a bedroom. Walk 
to KSU. $160. Share 
utilitiea. 539-1584. 

WANTED; ROOMMATE to 
share a two room apart- 
ment In Creatwood 
Apartment*. $220 a 
month. Vary new and 
vary nice. On top of 
Stagg Hill Call 539- 
4937. ask for David 



14X70 THREE-BEDROOM 
Mobile Home, one-half 
acre fenced for horses. 
Furnished/ unfurnished 
available June 1. 
637-7901 



1004 MCCOLLUM St., sum- 
mer sublease, two large 
bedrooms. One block 
from Durland Hall. $660 
plus utilities Call 567- 
4689. leave m see a g e. 

ACROSS FROM Ahaarn. 
Available lata 

May- July 31, Nice, 
ona-bedroom, dish- 
washer, water/ trash 
paid. $380 negotiable. 
776-4096, 

AVAILABLE MID-MAV- 
Aug. Sublaaaa one 
room in four-bedroom 
apartment. Pay only 
June and July $200/ 
month plua one-fourth 
utili tie*. Nlca, close to 
campua. Call 639-2811. 

AVAILABLE MID MAY 
through July 31 Fa- 
malt needed to tub- 
lease one room In two 
bedroom apartment. 
$210/ month plua one- 
half utilities. May rant 
free. 939-4207. 

AVAILABLE MID-MAY 
through lata August. 
One-half block from 
campus. Hunting Ave- 
nue partially furnished. 
w airier, dryer, one- half 
utilities, rent negoti 
able. 776-4021. 

BEST SET yen 

Mid-May- Aug. Mod- 
ern. Right by campu*. 
Negotiable 539-2136. 

CHEAP! FEMALE needed 
for lummer. $120 per 
month, one-third utili- 
ties. Your own room, 
one block from cam- 
put. 537-3845. 

CHEAP RENT for summer ' 
sublease Vary nica 
apartment. One block 
from campu*. Only 
$130 a month. Needed 
either May or June 
until Aug. 1. Female 
roommate preferred. 
Call 776-1495. Ask for 
Gin*. 

CLEAN TWO-BEDROOM 
apartment. Very close 
to campus and Ag 
gieville Price negoti- 
able call Jenny or Amy 
537-2835 

DESPERATELY SEEKING 

summer sublsasers for 
two-bedroom apart 
mem. Close to campu* 
and Aggieville No rea- 
sonable offer refusedl 
537 3S31 

FOR SUMMER sublease, 
two-bedroom apart- 
ment. One block from 
campus. Will negotiate 
, pries. 637-4739. 

FOUR-BEDROOM/ TWO 

bath*. Apartment near 
Aggieville and campus 
Very nice and modern. 
Rant negotiable. Call 

Lori 539-4530, 

FULLY FURNISHED 

two-bedroom epert- 
ment available mid- 
May- Jury 31. Close to 
campus and Aggieville. 
water and trash paid. 
Rant negotiablel 

537-9634 

HOT DAMN! Wanting to 
live in luxury over the 
summer and not have 
to pay tor it? Curious 
about Chase Manhat- 
tan Apartments? We've 
got the answer for you. 
Pool, aundeck, basket 
ball, lounge, weight- 
room, huge rooms, 
laundry, private balco- 
ny for parties- excited 
yet? Three- four-bad- 
rooma. Call quick and 
snap 'er upll 539-1261. 

JUNE- JULY sublaaaa 
large two-bedroom 
apartment $375 water/ 
trash paid, dlshwssher, 
low utilities 519 Ossg* 
776-2393. 

JUNE AND July sublease. 
Nice, clean two-bed- 
room, on* bath. Weth- 
er/ dryer. Close to cam- 
pus. Call 776-3144. 

MALE/ FEMALE aublaaasr 
mid-May- Aug. Own 
bathroom, utilities 
paid, except one-half 

1 ph 
rent free $150/ month 



kPL and phone. May 
rent free $150/ 
537-3069, Steve 

NICE TWO-BED- 

ROOM, aummar tub 

lease. Pool, washer/dry- 
er. Rant $450 but very 
negotiable. May rem 
paid. 776-7643. 

NON-SMOKING FEMALE 
to ahare four-bedroom. 
Apartment and bed- 
room furnished. Closa 
to campua and Ag- 
gieville. Available 
mid-May through July 
31. $200/ month, utili- 
tiea paid. Contact An- 
gle, 537-4269 



I 



ONE-BEDROOM BASE- 
MENT apartment avail- 
able mid-May through 
mid-August. Rant $200. 
Washer, dryer, air con- 
ditioner, partly fur 
nished Close to cem- 

Sus across from Ford 
all. Call at 7784636. 

ONE-BEDROOM STUDIO 
furnished In complex, 
1219 Claflln. Next to 
campu*. Sublaaaa 
May- July 31 $300 plus 
electric, plua deposit. 
No pets 537-1180 

OWN ROOM in two-bad 
room. Pet* OK May 1- 
Jury 31. $t92.50 rant ne- 
gotiable. 537-2290. 

OWN ROOM In two-bed- 
room apartment, two 
poola, washers and dry- 
era. SI 41.67, plu* one 
third utilitiea. 537-4030 
or 537-9067 ask for Jen 



SIX-BEDROOM SUMMER 
% sublease Washer/ dry- 
' er, central air. three 

blocks from campus. 

Vary nice, SI 60 negoti- 

sbls. 776-5942 or 

776-3773. 

SPACIOUS TWO-BED- 
ROOM apartment. 
Large master bedroom. 
Across from campu*. 
near Aggieville. $480 
par month. 537-8104. 

SUBLEASE FOR summer- 
female preferred. One 
block from campua end 
Aggieville. Call 

639-2371 s*C for Kim. 

SUBLEASE ONE-BED- 
ROOM of two-bed- 
room apartment In 
quiet building. Avail- 
able now- July 31. All 
utilitiea paid, except 
electric, central air, cats 
allowed. Cell 539-8506. 

SUBLEASE ROOM m three 
bedroom apartment, 1 
and one-half blocks 
from campus. $175 a 
month, negotiable. Call 
Tom. 537-9825. 

SUBLEASE, FEMALE 

roommate wanted, 
own room, can be fur- 
niahad, $175/ month 
plus half utilitiea, cloae 
to 'ville and campua. 
Non smoker wanted. 
778-1301, leave me* 



SUBLEASE: SPACIOUS 
t h r ee- bed r o om on* 
and ona-helf bath. 

Great summer location. 
June and July- Nego- 
tiable. Cell 537-3981. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 
large, two-bedroom 
apartment; two blocks 
from campua. one and 
one-half blocks from 
Aggieville, rent negoti- 
able; call 776-3483. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 
roommata needed, 
own room $200/ month 
plua utilitiea, washer/ 
dryer, do** to campu* 
and Vet Med. 637-1561. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- Stu- 
dio apartment right 

next to campus. Fur- 
nished, water and trash 
paid. Available May 15- 
Aug. 1 $300,539-8203. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- to 
ahare three-bedroom 

apartment, $200/ 

month and one-third 
utilitiea. Call Taleyna 
637-2538 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 

one-bedroom. Fur- 
nished or unfurnished. 
Utilitiea paid. $250/ 
month. Near campua. 
Cell 776-0596 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 

two-bedroom fully fur- 
nished apartment. 
Cloae to campu* avail- 
able May 15. pay only 
Jun* and July $350./ 
month Call 537-2610 



SUMMER SUBLEASE) 
Three-bedroom, cloae 
to campus and Ag 
gievillel Price negoti- 
able! Call today! 
637-6129 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, 
nice, negotiable, 

two-bedroom, two 
bath, vary cloae to Ag- 
gieville Mid-May- July 
31 CaH 538-4123, 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, 
one-bedroom in a 
three-bedroom apart- 
ment. Cloae to Ag 

Rieville. Quiet neighbor- 
ood. $195/ month plu* 
utilitiea. Call Susan at 
537-9376. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, 

roommate to share two- 
bedroom apartment 
close to campus 539- 
8499. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE, spe- 
cious, three-bedroom 
apartment. Two blocks 
from camp J*. Avai labia 
mid-May. Price negoti 
able. Cell 537-8074 and 



SUMMER SUBLEASE. 
Non-amoker to share 

two-bedroom apart- 
ment. Furnished. Own 
room. Washer/ dryer. 
Call 776-1847 after 

5:30p.m. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE: Two 

-bedroom apartment 
available mid-May until 



Make music 

Want to team to play the 
guitar? Check the Collegian 
classifieds to find someone to 
give you lessons. Only $5 for 
up to 20 words. You'll make 
music in no time. 



c 



KANSAS STATE 

OLLEGIAN 



Kedzie 103 (east of the Union) 




July 31. Water and 

trash paid. Rent negoti 
able. 539-6697. 

THREE-BEDROOM SUB- 
LEASE $175 par room 
Jun* 1 to Aug. 1. Call 
532-2891. 

TOWNHOUSE SUMMER 

sublease option to rent. 
Five-bedrooms. 2.6 
bathroom*, washer/ 
dryer. Available on or 
after May 1. $166/ 
month/ person 

637-3027. 

TWO-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT $300, close to 
campus and Aggieville, 
sublease beginning 
mid-May or June 
through July 31. 
637-6122. 

TWO-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT, one block from 
campu*. Available 
mid-May to July 31. 
$165 a month. May rent 
paid. Call 537-1734. 

TWO-BEDROOM HOUSE 

Availsbls mid-May to 
July 31. Option for 
1994- 95 school year. 
No pets. 539-3497. 

TWO-BEDROOM, FUR- 
NISHED, one block 
from camput. Air con- 
ditioner, dishwasher. 
All utilities paid. Rent 
negotiable. Call/leave 
message, 776-3035. 

WOOOWAY- ONE BED- 
ROOM AVAILABLE 
May 1- July 31. Call 
537-3962. 



200 



SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



T Y? in 9 



DATA SHEETS, term pa- 

Eeri, dissertations. 
tser printer. Fest. ac- 
curate service. 12 years 
experience. Mrs. Bur- 
den. 639-1204. 

RESUME RESUME RE 
SUM! and all your 
Other word processing 

needs. Later printing. 
Call Bisnde, 776-3290. 

WORDPROCESSING SUP- 
PORT for your acade- 
mic and professional 
needa Papers. 

resumes, letters, re- 
port*. Contact Peggie 
(evenings! at 539-1 191. 



PisyHSiny 



Testing ( Vmiit 

539-3338 

•I ILV] 



•Sun*,' tit) ilniIk 

« .illti- T. tjT|» until i-iil 
I tuak'J JiTiivi limn 

\nifciMio\illjtti 



Automotive 
Rspailr 



NISSAN- DATSUN Repair 
Service. 22 year* ex 
perience. Maidaa. Hon- 
das and Toyotas alao. 
Auto Craft, 2812 Dipper 
Lane, Manhattan, Kan 
aaa 537-6049. 8a.m.- 
5p.m. Mori- Frl. 



Other 



INTERNATIONAL STUD- 
ENTS: DV-1 Greencsrd 
Program. Sponsored 
by U.S. .Immigration. 
Greancarda provide 
U.S. permanent resi- 
dent status. Citizens of 
almost all countries are 
allowed. For Informa- 
tion and form*: New 
Era Legal Services, 
20231 Stagg St., Cano- 
ga Park, CA 91306. Tel: 
18181772-7169; 
(816)998-4426. Mon - 
Sun.: 10a.m.- 11p.m. 

PROMPT CONTRACEPTIVE 

and abortion services. 
Dale L. Clinton. M.O., 



(913)641-67 16. 



HEALTH AMD Auto cov- 
erage. Call us before 
purchasing The Uni- 
versity Hearth Plan. Tim 
L. Engle Agency 352B 
Kimball Ave. (Candle- 
wood Shopping Cen- 
ter) 637-4661. KSU 
grad 1988 



300 



EMPLOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 



Hstp Want**) 



The Collegian cannot 
verify the financial po- 
tential of advertise 
mente In the Employ 
ment/Caraer c lata! flea 
fion. Reader* are ad 
vised to approach any 
such employment op- 
portunity with reason- 
able caution. The Col- 
leglan urge* our read- 
era te contact the Set- 
ter Buainaa* Bureau, 
601 SE Jefferson, To 

5 eke, KS 86607 1190. 
11] \2 32 -04 64 

SI NANNIES Needed $S 
Great salaries, screened 
families, air far* paid, 
cart available, and 
much morel New Eng- 
land, New York, New 
Jersey, DC, Florida, 
Kansas City agency, 
and meet us face to 
fece. TLC/ Templeton 
Caregiver*. 
(8001535-1888. 

$760/ WEEK. ALASKA 

FISHERIES thia sum- 
mer. Maritime Service* 
I20SMSO-0219. 

ALASKA SUMMER EM- 
PLOYMENT- Earn up 
to 68000 plua in two 

months. Room and 
board! Transportation t 
Male or female. No ex- 
periene necessary Call 
(206)545-4155 e»t 
A67B9. 

ARGANBRIGHT MAR 
VESTING. Wanted, 
clean cut person for 94 
harvett run Bast equip- 
ment and pay mid-May 
through mid-Aug. 
Thad, 1-363-2737. 

ATTENTION STUOENTS- 
I'm looking for B- 10 
sharp hard- working 
students for summer 
work. If $5600, t/avsl 
and a challenge appeals 
to you, csll 

(800)840-2640. 

CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIR- 
ING Earn up to $2,000 
plus/ month working on 
Cruise Ship* or Land- 
Tour companies World 
travel. Summer and 
Full-time employment 
available No experi- 
ence necessary. For 
more information call 1- 
206 634-0468 ext C576S 

DELIVERY DRIVERS want- 
ad for (he KC Metro 
Area. Put your vehicle 
to work for you. Full- 
time days, great sum- 
mer job. Call Quick D* 
livery (913)688-8627. 



EARN OVER $100/ hour 
processing our mall at 
horn*. For information 
Call (202)310-6868. 

ENERGETIC, WELL organ 
it ad individual needed 
to provide leadership to 
meet housing needs of 
older Kensant In 
18-county region. Re- 
sponsibilities include 
budget and program 
administration, com- 
munity development 
pfenning, resource de- 
velopment and person 
nel management. Posi- 
tion it based In Manhet 
tan and requires day- 
time travel. Required: 
Good communication 
skills and a 'can do' at- 
titude Alao re quire eh 
B.S. in planning, public 
administration, busi- 
ness adminiatration or 
equivalent experience. 
Demonstrated experi- 
ence in management of 
houaing programs and 
housing issues affect- 
ing older Kant am Ex- 
perience with HUD pro- 
grams and computer 
skills preferred. Start- 
ing salary $17,800 plus 
benefit*. Submit cower 
letter, resume and 
three reference* to 
Screening Committee, 
NC-FH Area Agency on 
Aging, 437 Houston St.. 
Manhattan. KS 66502 
Application* must be 
received by April 26, 
1994. EOE/AA. 

HARVEST HELP wanted. 
Need combine and 
truck drivers for turn 
mar wheat harvest. 
Board, room. and. good 
pay. Home before 
school start*. 

1913)877-2094. 

HAVE FUN, make memo- 
ries and money t Chris- 
tian family harvester* 
need kitchen helper, 
laundry, cook and 
clean. Half day for 
$500, full day SI 000 
plu* room and board. 
No couch potatoes- po- 
sition filled. 
(316)328-4232. 

HELP WANTEO for custom 
harvest combine op- 
erator* and truck driv- 
er* Experience pre- 
ferred. Call 
1303)483-7480 evenings. 

HIRING CREW for custom 
harvest run. Must be 
willing to learn and 
work hard 1-392-3436. 

INTERNATIONAL EM- 
PLOYMENT- Make up 

to $2000- $40000 plus/ 
month teaching basic 
conversational English 
in Japan. Taiwan, or S. 
Korea. No teaching 
background or Asian 
language* required. For 
information call: 

(206)632-1 146 
axtJ5768 

LABORERS NEEDED. Land 
scepe and retaining 
wall experience re- 

Sufred Start imme- 
ietely, call 

1913)841-6347. 

NANNIES WANTED- Posi- 
tions nationwide, sum- 
mer or year round, ex- 
perience not required. 
Great pay and benefits, 
free (ravel. 

(612)643-4399 

NANNY/ CHILDCARE giv- 
er. Mature, responsible, 
loving person Wanted 
to care for one end 
three year old girls at 
our home Monday- Fri- 
day, 7:30a.m.- 5:30pm 
beginning May 16, 1994 
or August 1994 Part 



time alao a possibility 
Permanent position, 
good pay. Call 776-6338 

NEW6PAPER AOVER- 



R ornery Publication* 
as an opening for en 
advertising ssles repre- 
sentative to service ac- 
counts in our multi-pub- 
lication area. Must b* 
responsible. Wall- or- 
ganized self- starter 
who can produce re- 
sults with minimal su- 
pervision. Previous 
media sale* experience 
preferred. 8*** salary 
plu* commission and 
mileage allowance. 
Send resume M CON- 
FIDENCE to Dally 
Union, P.O. Box 129. 
Junction City. Kansa* 
66441 or fill out applies 
tio